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Music Review: Future of Forestry – Travel

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Future of Forestry is an alternative rock band from Southern California. The band’s name is taken from a poem of the same name written by acclaimed English author C. S. Lewis.

Travel is the band’s fourth album and the first six-song EP in their three-part Travel series. I typically like my rock harder, but I was intrigued by the seemingly progressive feel to some of the samples that I heard. Luckily, I wasn’t disappointed. While the album is lighter than I typically like, the band’s expansive sound and warm layers of instrumentation are quite memorable.

There’s a definite inspirational or spiritual tone to Travel, but it can be enjoyed by anyone. The journey begins with “Traveler’s Song”. It’s light harmonies reminded me a bit of Snow Patrol. “This Hour” picks the pace and urgency up a notch. It’s marked with an excellent mixture of strings, a piano, and a guitar. It’s one of the more distinctive tracks on first listen as it’s the most upbeat and rocks more than the others.

“Colors in Array” is a minimalist track compared to the dynamism of “This Hour”. It has a prominent ethereal and other-worldly quality that seems to be a constant in Future of Forestry’s sound.

“Halleluiah” is arguably Travel‘s best track. It starts off simple enough, but builds to a near masterpiece. It’s thematic quality and progressive electronic tone is haunting and beautiful. After additional listens the song stood out as my favorite track. The scale and expansiveness of the track is awesome and it boasts great instrumentation and background vocals.

At first listen, Future of Forestry may sound like some of their light or pop rock peers, but there’s a lot more going on than meets the ear. Fans of this type of rock may notice a bit quicker, but it took me a few listens to appreciate what they have produced. The ethereal quality to their tracks took me by surprise and I was glad that I gave them their due and listened to the album several times. I’m interested to see where Future of Forestry will take us on the other EPs in the Travel series.

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