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Music Review: Fuck Buttons – Tarot Sport

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Fuck Buttons are the result of an atypical hybrid of electronic music and post-rock. Their second album, Tarot Sport, is not your typical instrumental electronic fare. It distinctly settles in the post-rock world with piles of sustained guitar distortion. By successfully blending the two styles, Fuck Buttons are deserving of their place as one of the best acts of 2009.

In large doses Tarot Sport can be a trying journey. Due to its hypnotic quality it leans towards fits of unrest, and seems undecided on whether to trance its listeners or inflict voodoo-doll stimuli on them. Almost exclusively written in major keys, the album has a very uplifting mood that is appropriately represented in its cover art. Pumping adrenaline through each pounding beat Tarot Sport conjures feelings of flying above the clouds.

“Olympians” is over and above the best track on the record, particularly because it feels like it’s the culmination of what has been the first half of the voyage. Preceded by an outstanding lead-in (“The Lisbon Maru”), “Olympians” is majestic and elated. It’s akin to the moment of epiphany you believe is waiting for you on the other side of the clouds as you break into the blue sky above. Also notable for its haunting guitar melody contrasted against a major mode, as well as its galloping tribal beat, is “Flight Of The Feathered Serpent”.

Overall, Tarot Sport is capable of escalating your pulse and laboring your breathing through breathtaking landscapes of tone and fuzz. Digesting the entire hour of sound in one sitting is a stirring feat in itself. Yet, if you are able to brave the mesmerizing intensity on these seven tracks it will likely result in more than just ringing in your ears. Your heart will be ringing too.

4 / 5 stars

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