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Music Review: Deep Purple – Rapture Of The Deep

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Deep Purple released Rapture Of The Deep November 1, 2005, and it remains their last studio album to date. The Mark VIII line-up of vocalist Ian Gillan, guitarist Steve Morse, bassist Roger Glover, drummer Ian Paice, and keyboardist Don Airey returned for this, their second album together, and they continue to play together as of 2012.

It was a solid modern day Deep Purple album. If you want classic Deep Purple, however, then track down Machine Head, Fireball, In Rock and the like because they are different from what the band was producing in the studio during the 1990s and 2000s. The group, on this release, produced more of a straight-forward hard rock sound that has remained the same from recent album to album. It took fewer chances than during the 1970s and 1980s, which meant not as many low points but also fewer high points as well. What remained were songs that ran together not only on individual albums but from album to album. The band also had the experience to produce songs that translated well to the live stage.

Steve Morse emerged as a guitarist of the highest order when he joined the band, and now the instrumental sound revolves around his expertise. Airey had several tours and an album under his belt and has emerged as more of a presence since his first release with DP. Paice and Glover have remained one of the more powerful rhythm sections in rock.

With all that said, it was Ian Gillan who was at the heart of the album. His lyrics were some of the best of his career and while his voice may not have been as strong as in the past and some of the high notes were not reachable anymore, he had adjusted and his voice remained one of the superior instruments on the hard rock music scene.

There are a number of solid songs that add up to 55 minutes of listening enjoyment. “Money Talks” was a heavy blues/rock fusion piece with a thumping bass foundation. “Clearly Quite Absurd” was a gentle ballad and a nice counterpoint to much of their modern day material. “Junkyard Blues” can be best described as a southern hard rocker that had its roots in Morse’s former, and once in a while current, band the Dixie Dregs. “Don’t Let Go” was another southern rock-type song with some honky tonk piano by Airey. “Back To Back” found Airey establishing himself with an excellent synthesizer solo.

Rapture Of The Deep was an intelligent album from a veteran band. It may not have broken any new ground, but it covered the old very well. And at close to 40 years into their career at the time of its release, that was more than enough.

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About David Bowling

  • http://classicrockmusicblog.com Todd

    Rapture is a solid album, and as noted Ian Gillan spins some fabulous lyrics. My favorite release of the Steve Morse-era Purple remains Purpendicular. It’s among the band’s very best works.

  • Robert Gates

    Enjoyable. On a different note, the band NO has just released their new single Meet Me After Dark. I’m confident you would like this music if you’re a fan of The Beatles and U2. Tim Jarzabek is the drummer, Mike Jarzabek piano, Justin Corman bass, Nick Jarzabek guitar vocals. Let me know what you think and keep up the great writing.

  • cromercrox

    I’ve had Rapture Of The Deep in the car more or less constantly for years. My kids were raised on it! It’s a terrific album, full of DP’s trademark sinewy, serpentine riffs and Gillan’s mysterious, allusive lyrics. The title track, with it’s middle-east-inflected riff, is my favourite track. My kids’, too.

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