Today on Blogcritics
Home » Mobile Review: Godzilla Monster Mayhem 3-D

Mobile Review: Godzilla Monster Mayhem 3-D

Please Share...Tweet about this on Twitter0Share on Facebook0Share on Google+0Share on LinkedIn0Pin on Pinterest0Share on TumblrShare on StumbleUpon0Share on Reddit0Email this to someone

Too many cell phone developers try to push the limits of hardware. What happens when you go outside the restraints is usually an unplayable disaster worse than what Godzilla typically does to Okinawa. Ironic, considering that Godzilla Monster Mayhem is one of those games.

In stills, Monster Mayhem looks great. The 3-D representations of Toho’s creature roster is excellent. Godzilla (duh), Rodan, Ghidrah, Mechagozilla, Angilas, and more are rendered well amidst a fully polygonal city. Unfortunately at some point, they have to move on screen.

The frame rate, if you can call it that, hovers around 3fps. The animation doesn’t even appear to represent movement. It’s impossible to tell when hits connect, and collision detection is spotty when it works. Movement is sluggish and unresponsive.

Even if the graphics could be handled by the phone, this would still be an awful fighter. Pummeling an opponent is matter of getting in close and executing one of a small roster of moves. As a meter charges, a special move related to the monster can be performed (Godzilla’s trademark flame breath), sapping significant life from your foe.

Two game modes, one which offers the fighting game and the other which lets you rampage through a major metropolis, fill out the menu. The rampaging isn’t any better. Your monster becomes lost behind buildings, it’s impossible to tell if you’re smacking a structure, and the military forces are hard to spot as they bring you down. Playing with the music on doesn’t help either as there are no sound cues, and none of the familiar Toho themes are present anyway. At least the monster roars are intact.

For Godzilla fans who might have enjoyed the rumbling in Atari’s fighting game series, this is NOT a portable alternative. This is actually an utter disgrace, an unplayable mess that represents the worst aspects of mobile gaming. This is inexcusable.


Powered by

About Matt Paprocki

Matt Paprocki has critiqued home media and video games for 13 years and is the reviews editor for Pulp365.com. His current passion project is the technically minded DoBlu.com. You can read Matt's body of work via his personal WordPress blog, and follow him on Twitter @Matt_Paprocki.
  • Tyler

    I actually enjoy the game.