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Mixed Reports From Libya

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The British media have noted that one of several defectors from the Libyan Gadhafi administration, Abdel Fattah Younes al Abidi, is recognized at least by some as the “Head of the Rebel Forces.”  Al Abidi defected from his post as interior minister in Gadhafi’s organization . The news from Britain is that rebel forces in Brega cheered and fired their guns in the air as al Abidi arrived. Following the raucous welcome, the deemed head of the rebels “mounted his convoy, and headed toward the front line.”

Meanwhile, at a televised press conference, Mustafa Abdel Jalil, (pictured) head of the rebel Interim National Council, outlined hope for agreements and a ceasefire. Jalil, awarene that rebels were becoming increasingly discouraged and that  President Obama had again declared that there would be no American troops on the ground, was there to lay plans before the Libyan administration for a unilateral cease fire, with an agreement that Gadhafi fighters would retreat from western cities and built up areas.

Mustafa Abdel Jalil, himself a former justice minister under Gadhafi, was likely influenced by a number of factors: in truth, the outlook seems bleak for the already overwhelmed rebels. Admiral Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said that American jets would not fly with NATO air forces. This comes at a time when, in fact, most of the air support coming primarily from the United States has been grounded for the past few days, the result of adverse weather conditions and sandstorms. Jalil indicated that if Gadhafi fighters would retreat from western cities and built up areas, the rebels would withdraw and cease the opposition campaign.

The government of Libya would not hear of the plan. Mussa Ibrahim, a spokesman for Gadhafi, made this stern reply, “They are asking us to withdraw from our own cities. …. If this is not mad then I don’t know what this is. We will not leave our cities…”

British reports say that in Brega, in which Abdel Fattah Younes al Abidi, head of the rebel forces has now  arrived,  morale is high. The report from Brega says unarmed civilians are coming forward to join the rebel cause.

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About John Lake

John Lake had a long and successful career in legitimate and musical theater. He moved up into work behind the camera at top motion pictures. He has done a smattering of radio, and television John joined the Blogcritics field of writers owing to a passion for the liberal press, himself speaking out about the political front, and liberal issues. Now the retired Mr. Lake has entered the field of motion picture, television, and video game (now a daily gamer!) critique. His writing is always innovative and immensely readable!
  • pablo

    Do you really believe that shit you write about Lake? Or do you just like parroting the MSM/CIA propaganda machine for kicks?

  • Cannonshop

    #1 Do you have counter-information from reliable sources contradicting or contra-indicating Mr. Lake’s article, Pablo?

  • pablo not

    Cannon,

    Reliable sources? What do you consider to be a reliable source on what is going on over there? I have already indicated that I do not find the MSM/CIA propaganda machines reliable. So obviously I would have to offer another source.

    When I hear words coming from the MSM sources such as “protect civilians” and/or seeking democracy regarding the rebel/insurgents in Libya I laugh out loud.

    For the record I can’t stand Khadaffi, but the same can be true of most of the jihadists/terrorists that are operating for the agency over in Eastern Libya.

    Here is in my opinion a highly credible, succinct, and detailed report of what the MSM/CIA is not telling you about Libya

    2007 West Point Study Shows Benghazi-Darnah-Tobruk Area was a World Leader in Al Qaeda Suicide Bomber Recruitment

    Try and read that with an open mind Cannon, and I DARE say Mr. Lake, of whom I am sure will not read this. Enjoy!

  • John Lake

    Pablo: I find it unlikely that the Libyan opposition is in fact hard core suicide bombing extremists. I did however in my article which is supported by reliable links mention that Mustafa Abdel Jalil, head of the rebel Interim National Council, was at one time a justice minister under Gadhafi. To further fuel our suspicions, we find that Abdel Fattah Younes al Abidi, the “Head of the rebel forces” was at one point Gadhafi’s Interior Minister. The information about al Abidi was clearly written in several source articles, in the public press. The Information about Mustafa Abdel Jalil, who went on Libyan television to suggest what amounted to rebel surrender, with certain provisions, was not in any article that came to my attention. It was by sheer chance that I discovered that he was in fact linked to Gadhafi. There is more to this than meets the eye. If Obama seems to have cooled his support, beyond the previously arranged plan to turn the air strikes over to NATO, it is perhaps with good reason.
    I find some skepticism that we should ever have considered that these “young, student” rebel forces, buoyed up by the victory in Egypt, could ever have hoped to bring their cars and trucks and take on Gadhafi Loyalists and mercenaries.

  • pablo

    Then I can safely assume that you did not read the article John? Since all you quoted was the headline.

  • Doug Hunter

    “When I hear words coming from the MSM sources such as “protect civilians” and/or seeking democracy regarding the rebel/insurgents in Libya I laugh out loud.”

    Yes! Someone else has noticed. I smell an undercurrent of government psyops and propaganda. Uniformly, rebels with weapons are referred to as ‘civilians’. In fact, much of the supposed atrocities carried out by Qaddaffi before were very sketchy, the media was taking ‘eyewitness’ reports and word of mouth from rebel sources as gospel whereas all Libyan government reports were given vast disclaimers and played off as ‘government propaganda’. It’s as if it never occured to them that the ‘rebel sources’ under close eye of CIA operatives could be playing the same game, that the civilian casualties could have been rebel fighters, etc. There’s enough lying going on that I really don’t know what to think about what’s going on over there… I do know one thing after the last 10 years… I don’t trust the US government. The system lies about the goals (since when were AC-130 gunships and A-10 warthogs used for ‘no fly zones), they’ve picked military alliances while using cover of ‘protecting civilians’. Everything is lies, spin, and propaganda and I don’t want any part of it.

  • Doug Hunter

    #4

    Certainly not all of them, but their ranks do include the jihadists, some of who are veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan fighting us. Are we now going to arm them in one country and fight them in another?

    Here’s another article regarding a rebel leader with Afghanistan experience.

    Libyan rebel commander admits his fighters have al-Qaeda links

  • pablo

    No comment John Lake?

  • John Lake

    Pablo: I’m reading what I’m reading, and holding silent.

  • pablo

    Now that really makes a whole lot of sense John.

  • Clavos

    It would be refreshing if the Americans would just once be frank and admit that their ONLY compelling reason for involvement anywhere in the Middle East is a three letter word.

  • pablo

    That would be refreshing Clavos.

  • STM

    If they wanted the three-letter word, they’d just buy it and keep old Muammar, the friendly Pan Am despot, in power.

    I’d still like to think this is something else, and the fact I’ve seen British, French, Danish, Spanish and Italian aircraft (and in equal numbers to those of the US) taking part in this sad venture (also sanctioned by the Arab League itself) convinces me this is so.

    For once, I hope it’s about removing a despot and promoting human decency; and this time, doing it properly so that Libyans can decide for themselves without any interference from the rest of us beyond enabling that.

  • iball

    “If they wanted the three-letter word, they’d just buy it and keep old Muammar, the friendly Pan Am despot, in power.”

    Buying it isn’t good enough for the unfriendly EuroCanAm pisspots. Muammar was keen to totally nationalize Libyan oil and that didn’t go over too well at all.
    The coalition prefers Western control of
    African and Middle East oil so poor old Muammar and gord knows how many other Libyans have to be….how to put this delicately?….murdered.

    “ooooooh, aren’t they worried they’ll be dragged in front of the ICC?”, asked Thud the flying pig.

  • STM

    iball: “Muammar was keen to totally nationalize Libyan oil and that didn’t go over too well at all.”

    Gaddafi had recently improved his relationship with the West to the point where he’d almost become a puppet.

    There wasn’t any risk that Libya’s oil wouldn’t be flowing our awy. The opposite, in fact. Gaddafi needed western money and infrastructure to keep the profits coming.

    For once, someone has stepped in to do the right thing. I’ll claim as evidence that half the country is now run by rebels who want to see an end to his despotic and cruel 40-year reign, one of the delightful highlights of which was the Pan Am bombing over Scotland.

    They – the rebels wanting a new future – were the ones being murdered en masse. The ledger on that score will be firmly in Gaddafi’s favour at about 1000:1 when the tally is finally counted.

    Do Americans actually read legitimate and professional news reports from these places or just get their info from the internet (where it must all be true)?

    Whether the rebels will end up being much better than Gaddafi is another issue entirely, but surely, said Clunk, the pink elephant, if it’s something the people want then it must be better than what they’ve got now.

    Oh, that’s right, didn’t those perfumed nancy boys from across the English channel help America in its fight against the British 200 years back? Wasn’t that because the will of the people (or a pack of self-interested old farts) wanyed to determine their own futures?

  • iball

    “There wasn’t any risk that Libya’s oil wouldn’t be flowing our awy.”

    That wasn’t implied.

    “Muammar Gaddafi said on Wednesday his country and other oil exporters were looking into nationalizing foreign firms due to low oil prices and suggested Tripoli might not stick to OPEC production quotas.” reuters Jan 1/09

    “I’ll claim as evidence that half the country is now run by rebels.”

    Sure you will; with no evidence.

    “They – the rebels wanting a new future – were the ones being murdered en masse.”

    Again; no evidence.

    “Do Americans actually read legitimate and professional news reports…”

    Yes. They have Tripoli Gleaner and the Benghazi Herald delivered daily.

    “…if it’s something the people want then it must be better than what they’ve got now.”

    Better than one of the highest standards of living in Africa and akin to Britain.

    Okay, enough with the “people of Libya” refrain when refering to CIA/MI6/ Al Qaeda dupes.

    Michael Scheuer on CNN.

  • Glenn Contrarian

    STM –

    Do Americans actually read legitimate and professional news reports from these places or just get their info from the internet (where it must all be true)?

    We on the Left have no problem with reputable news sources like the New York Times, the BBC, al-Jazeera, and so forth…but nearly half our country is absolutely convinced that if it doesn’t come from Fox News (or is otherwise approved by the Right’s pundits and politicians) it must therefore be slanted terribly to the left and is therefore not to be trusted.

  • John Lake

    Some of us are concerned about the right-slanted reports. We’re lucky we can trust any news source, anywhere. It would be great if we had a few more trustworthy politicians.
    Seriously, we are lucky. Many in the media do try hard.

  • http://blogcritics.org/writers/dr-dreadful/ Dr Dreadful

    @ iball…

    “Person”? Is that you?

    :-)

  • iball

    Not person

    personable maybe.

  • Cannonshop

    #11 “Idiocy” requires more than three letters, Clavos. I suspect the Arab League’s support to Quaddafi’s ouster may have more to do with his betraying the Jihad and cooperating with the Western powers in their conflict with/against certain factions of radical Islam, than his record as a (typical) Psychopathic Third World Dictator. I”m sorry, it may be cynical of me, but I don’t see any overwhelming (or underwhelming) national interest or benefit in getting involved in this-including moral benefits.

    Stan: When France intervened on behalf of the American Colonies, they were at war with, and in competition with, the British Empire and it was a cheap means of getting one over on their enemy-think, in modern terms, of both U.S. and Soviet efforts at funding insurgencies during the cold war targeted at screwing up the other side’s foreign policy goals-it was raw, calculated national interest (and the French witheld both money and support until the Rebels in the U.S. proved they could win a major, european-style land battle against British Regulars-hardly an unqualified expression of support.)

    The fundamental problem with funding and/or supporting revolutions for Revolutions’ sake (as the Soviets found out), is that you’re not guaranteed that what you’re installing (or assisting to be installed) isn’t going to be much worse than what you removed. The pattern typically goes the other way (as the U.S. discovered in Cambodia with the Khmer Rouge.)

    I’d say we don’t know who all the players are, and further that we don’t know what the long-term consequences of our involvement are even LIKELY to be. it could well turn out that it provides a lesson to the next psychotic dictator to toe the Radical Islamic/Socialist line against the West, or risk being back-stabbed by them.

    not exactly the lesson you want if you’re serious about reforming these situations.

  • John Lake

    March 5:
    Reports this AM say the rebels are shipping oil. Certainly goes a long way to establish credibility! The article mentions Jalal el-Galal, a member of the rebel media committee in Benghazi…
    Did I note? There’s more to this than meets the eye!
    from Reuters, no less!

  • Clavos

    I”m sorry, it may be cynical of me, but I don’t see any overwhelming (or underwhelming) national interest or benefit in getting involved in this-including moral benefits.

    I agree.

  • John Lake

    Here is a comment I just posted regarding the issue of the value of the intervention in Libya. If the comment seems simplistic, it is because the blog site is in the Southern Hemisphere, and they may have less interest in the thinking of the American president than we do.
    “We (America and the free world) have to keep alert in the Arab regions. We have to be in a position to defend Israel. We couldn’t let Gadhafi be a tyrant without responding; it would send a “bad message” to the Arab world. As it is, things appear to be improving. Quite dramatically. If we can convince Ahmadinejad and his ilk that we are not the enemy, that puts an end to much of the threat facing the world in the near future.
    Besides, what’s done is done, and there’s no going back.”

  • Bashawat2

    I went through this trail but clearly most comments come from people detached from the region. I am sitting in the Middle of it and tend to agree that a very dirty game is being played by the powerful countries involved. But let me assure you that there is a true and genuine rebellion (or revolution) driven by a genuine desire by many Libyans to instate change following 42 years of despotic, tyrannical and brutal rule! Please do not take our suffering in the Middle East lightly. We have endured hell from our regimes throughout the past century.

  • John Lake

    It seems to me that it would be more controversial, and less in keeping with the ongoing role of America for us not to have some participation. clandestine leadership, but with full global support. Russia remains an exception. China, whom Republican candidates demonize, is gradually moving toward a close alliance with the U.S. Gates is pure and unrelenting corporate; of course he thinks Obama is the worst; Obama wants to tax the rich. Corporations don’t have a conscience. Halliburton was hidden; Gates will become a supreme dictator who will stand by his destructive decisions, and challenge us to stop him. I seem a little OT. (Off topic).
    In any case, the Libyan people are sincere, who they appear to be, and deserve help. They have held up their end, but we can’t afford to take their cause. That’s been discussed at length.
    In any case, Bashawat2, we appreciate your comment, very much. If we loose Obama, we are looking at a bleak and dismal future.

  • John Lake

    Trump. Not Gates.