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iTunes 4.6: Items In Playlist Cannot Be Burned

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You can’t burn an MP3 CD from AAC files. You have to first convert the AACs to MP3. You can of course burn the AAC files to audio CD.

Excuse me, but this is bull pucky! iTunes does so much, why can it not rip an AAC to memory and then burn it to CD as an MP3 disc?

Stupid “feature.”

So I have to transcode my AAC files to MP3 (its a good thing iTunes does that) and then I can burn a MP3 CD. I now have a large portion of my collection in AAC. Had I known this I would have only used AAC for those files bought from the iTMS.

iTunes should be able to convert AAC on the fly to MP3 and then burn the MP3 disc. Toast rips MP3 files to AIFF before it makes an Audio CD.

I am not really miffed, it is just that I expect more from an Apple product such as iTunes.

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About Ken Edwards

  • olorin took

    you can burn a data disc, which amounts to the same thing as an mp3 disc, except that it can contain mp3s, aacs and whatever else you may have…

  • http://andrewquinn.org Andrew Quinn

    Except that you can’t play it in any stereos or Discmen…

    And, to the author- that’s so you can’t share them. The AAC files have special liscensing protection written in, so if iTunes were to convert to MP3 it would be literally catering to pilots.

  • http://breakingwindows.com/ Ken Edwards

    You are correct. I need a MP3 CD to play on a stereo and a Data CD will not.

    But, this has nothing to do with iTMS AAC files that have DRM on them. iTunes handles the protected AAC files differently then normal, non protected AAC files. I am refering to CDs that I bought in the store, and chose to rip to AAC because it makes a smaller file. I now want to burn those store bought, non protected files to a MP3 CD to play on a stereo.

    Apple is pretty liberal about their DRM licensing. And I have nothing bad to say about that.

    Since iTunes handles the protected AAC files differently, I see no reason why iTunes could not rip the AAC to MP3 and burn a MP3 CD.

    Thanks all I want. I am not looking to “stick it to the man.”

  • http://www.makeyougohmm.com/ TDavid

    Man, they are making this just wayyy too complicated for Joe Consumer :(

    It’s going to run people off and to P2P and other methods to get their music. These folks will never learn it seems.

    The equation really doesn’t seem that difficult to comprehend: Make it easier, more convenient for customers = they will spend more.

    Why is it no comprende’?

  • http://breakingwindows.com/ Ken Edwards

    Exactly. I have always subscribed to that equation. If I were not a geek and was Joe Consumer, I think I would have given up on the software.

  • Kima

    how do u do u convert mp3 to aac??

  • http://www.breakingwindows.com Ken Edwards

    Go to the Importing Preferences. This is under Advanced in later versions of iTunes preferences. Choose AAC.

    Select the tracks. Go to the Advanced Menu, and select Convert Selection to AAC.