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Interview: Patricia Eimer, Author of Luck of the Devil

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Patricia Eimer is a small town girl who was blessed with a large tree in the backyard that was a perfect spot for reading on summer days. Mixed with too much imagination it made her a bratty child but fated her  to become a storyteller. After a stint of “thinking practically” in her  twenties she earned degrees in Business and Economics and worked for a software firm in southwestern Germany but her  passion has always been a good book.

Patricia was gracious enough to take some time out of her busy schedule and answer some questions. Enjoy!

Are there any stories that have made you cry, laugh, stunned you or rendered you speechless when you heard it, that you had to incorporate them in your fiction?

I’ve always had this one I wanted to use and I haven’t yet. I was working at a very nice hotel as a maid, and we had this woman of an independent persuasion who used to do business in our hotel suites. Everyone knew what she did so they always put her in the very back suite away from the other guests. Well, I’d been there about three months, and I go to clean this suite and it’s pristine. Absolutely immaculate. The place doesn’t look touched. Then I open the bathroom door and find that the place is covered in blueberries and whipped cream. I mean it’s everywhere. The bathtub, the sink, the vanity, the Jacuzzi tub, the walk in shower, there are even blueberry handprints on the ceiling. But the towels — perfectly white. I always wondered how they managed to coat one room in blueberries and not get a speck of dirt anywhere else. 

How would you say you have evolved as a writer over time?

Oh, I started out in fanfiction, and some of the stuff I wrote is just unreadable. That’s the great thing about fanfiction, though — they’ll tell you instantly where you’re failing. Some of them nicely. Some of them not so much. But you learn quick, and you figure out how to build a plot and a world, and then you start throwing in your own characters, and before you know it you’ve picked up some craft books, and you’re on your way to an Internet MFA through self study. 

When you’re not writing, what are your favorite ways to relax and have some fun?

Baking. Oh, I love to bake. Which has required me to take up running and yoga. I’m not as big of a fan of those two activities, but they’re not bad. When I’m not writing or baking or trying to fight off the pounds from all the baking I spend a lot of time with my hubby, my kids and my dogs. Not in that particular order. 

Of all the books you have written, do you have a favorite? If so, which one and why?

I have a YA series that I’m working on and I’ve fallen in love with it. I can’t say too much about it right now, but this book wrote itself. I went into it with a very clear idea of what was going to happen, and the world took over. I would come out of my office and look at my husband and then say, “my story was just hijacked by mermaids” or “I have an infestation of pixies”. I’m at the point where I wake up every day excited to write this story just because I can’t wait to see what happens next. 

Do you have plans to write other genres in the future?

I love writing paranormal, but I’m also hoping to branch out into lots of other realms. YA, I’ve got some ideas for a romantic suspense with spies and explosions and all sorts of fun, and I’ve even considered doing some historical. Who knows though all that time in the library may cause flashbacks to college. 

Has your life changed since you’ve become a published author? If so, how?

I gave up my day job, which is something a lot of people warned me not to do, but it’s been the best thing ever for me. Instead of being trapped in a position I hate I spend my days doing something I love, and it’s bled over into every aspect of my life. By far the greatest part, though — I haven’t put on a pair of high heels in three months, and if I have my way I’ll never wear them again. 

I have found that some authors listen to music while they write. Do you listen to music or is it something that is distracting to you?

I’ve got to have music; otherwise, the chaos in the rest of the house interferes too much. 

Do you ever fear writer’s block or that you’ll let your audience down?

I’m terrified of both. I had a bout of writer’s block that lasted three months once, and I thought my poor husband was going to lose it trying to talk me down each night. I was an absolute mess until the words just came back one day. 

As far as disappointing readers this really came up for me when I was writing the sequel to Luck of the Devil. I can remember sitting at my computer going, “must be funny, must be funny, oh crap, what if I’m not funny?” At one point I called my editor almost in tears, sure I’d never manage to get the book done. 

Do you belong to any writers groups and what do you feel you have gained from the social sites?

I’m a member of RWA and SavvyAuthors as well as being a contributor on The Naked Hero Blog. Social sites were something I avoided until I became a published author, and now they are my new addiction. I’ve met so many fabulous, friendly people who make me laugh and give me support every single day. 

How do you keep your characters fresh and the plot exciting?

I try to think about what makes me laugh, people I’d want to hang out with, and then I write about them. They tend to lead the plot somewhere interesting most of the time. 

Can you tell us one thing about yourself that most of your fans don’t already know?

I have freakishly long toes that I can and have used as a set of fingers when absolutely necessary. I once picked up a cube of ice between my big toe and my second toe and managed to drop it into a glass (empty) on a table just to win a bet. Easiest $50 I ever made. 

What do you feel are the benefits of the new electronic readers to the environment?

I think they promote reading and anything that promotes reading is a good thing. Now instead of saying, well, it’s too much hassle to take a book along, I’ll just sit here people can grab an ereader loaded down with books and read no matter where they are. And anything that gets people to read, and read more, is a good thing in my opinion.

What impact do electronic readers create on the bottom line for authors in the end? Do you feel they have a negative impact or positive, or no impact at all that you can see?

I work with Entangled Publishing, which has really generous ebook royalty rates, so I think the ebook revolution is going to have a positive effect for me. Plus ebooks are giving more people more chances to get their stories out for people to read, and I can’t help but think that as time goes on we’re all going to see the benefits of all those choices.

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  • Pj Schott

    Loved the long toes story!!