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Interview: Mike DiCerto, Author of The Adventures of Rupert Starbright: The Door to Far-Myst

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Mike DiCerto has been a film maker as well as a writer since he was a child. Putting his talents to work, Mr. DiCerto has directed several music videos, documentaries, shorts, promotional videos and two feature films, No Exit and Triptosane.  

On the writing front, Mike DiCerto’s first novel, Milky Way Marmalade was the winner of the 2003 Dream Realm Award and has been met with rave reviews. Mr. DiCerto’s latest work is The Adventures of Rupert Starbright: The Door to Far-Myst, a middle grade fantasy novel that is sure to catch the interest of even the most reluctant of readers.  

When not working or writing, MIke DiCerto keeps himself busy with many interests, including Yoga, gardening, cats, playing guitar, and indulging in ’70s era TV.  Mr. DiCerto resides in New York City with his soul-mate/wife, Suzy and their rescued cat, Cosmo.

Readers can learn more about Mr. DiCerto, his world, and his works by visiting his website, blog, and Facebook page.

Please tell us a bit about your book,The Adventures of Rupert Starbright: The Door to Far-Myst, and what you hope readers take away from reading it.

The story deals with Rupert Dullz, a boy tired of doing boring things in his boring town and his boring teachers and parents who make everything even more boring. When a strange and colorful man descends into Graysland in his colorful balloon (which he calls a “bagoon”) and sings of a thing called “imagination,” all the adults forbid the children from speaking of such things. Only Rupert’s grandmother — sick with the “cuffus” — understands his longings for something more exciting. Rupert embarks on his adventure to the colorful world of Far-Myst for only one reason — a very selfless reason — to find a cure for his grandma’s sickness. But he learns that all that glitters is not gold and the world of Far-Myst has a darkness approaching it. All the children are gone and they desperately need a child’s imagination to save their world. Rupert finds himself facing life and death situations. I hope the readers, in addition to being very entertained, come away with a renewed sense of the value of wonder, compassion and love.

Do you have a favorite line or excerpt from your book?

I love this line — for some reason. My favorite:

“It was ten minutes past nine, and the moon was climbing the sky slowly but surely, the way moons like to do.”

If your current release were to be turned into a movie, who would you love to see play what characters and why?

I would want a unknown to play Rupert. Viggo Mortensen would be a great Dream Weaver. Billy Connolly as Pie O’Sky. Marion Cotillard as Queen Chroma (my wife will kill me), and some big badass for Murkus.

What are your favorite aspects of writing?

The bliss of being alone with your characters and in their world and watching it all unfold before your eyes. Magically.

Your least favorite aspects of writing?

I do not have as much time to write as I would like.

Who are some of your favorite authors/books?

I read mostly non-fiction because I find the wonders of the Universe are more inspiring than fiction. These include Supernatural by Graham Hancock. The Holographic Universe by Michael Talbot. In fiction I love Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. Tolkien. Dr Seuss! I really enjoy Arthur C. Clarke especially Childhood’s End.

What are you reading right now?

Actually fiction: Do Robots Dream of Electric Sheep?

If you could have a dinner party and invite five authors – dead or alive – who would they be and what would you serve them?

Kurt Vonnegut, Douglas Adams, Theodor Seuss Geisel, J.R.R.Tolkien, and Joseph Campbell. I would serve green eggs and ham and pan galactic gargleblasters.

What is a book that you wish you could say that you had written and why?

Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy. My first novel, Milky Way Marmalade was generously compared to it. I love off-the-wall humor.

What is the greatest piece of advice (for writing and/or just living) that you have heard?

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