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Interview: Band of the Week – 2nd Day Crush

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Alt-pop/indie rock band 2nd Day Crush (2DC) are formed around singer-songwriter and guitarist Chris Drizen and producer, bassist, and musical fly-boy Rick Barrio Dill. Two musicians seemingly diametrically opposed in backgrounds both musically and socially, Drizen is a middle class Bostonian and Cuban; Barrio Dill is from the Latin quarter of Miami.

Together with Rami Jrade, Jeremy Weinberg, and George Lind they have created an alt-pop, garage rock band with a conscience. 2DC have an environmental conscience, a political conscience, and a social conscience and this is reflected in their music. Several of the tracks on their debut album, The Nights You Lost Your Voice have a political message. These boys aren’t happy with the current state of things and are putting their money where their mouths are. They have decided to donate a portion of every album sold to two charities close to their hearts Invisible Children and Conversation International. An impressive gesture from such a young and unsigned band.

2DC at the Carnival2DC’s effervescent brand of pop is radio friendly without being insipid. Strong melodies, catchy riffs and energetic harmonies are blended with intelligent, meaningful lyrics. This fresh sound is due in no small part to the mixture of those differing backgrounds which has helped Drizen and Barrio Dill to create something glistening, interesting, and fun.

I recently got to chat with both Rick Barrio Dill and Chris Drizen and had the time of my life. Witty, down-to-earth, and passionate these two men really have a chemistry together and they were kind enough to share some with me.

How did you two meet and form 2nd Day Crush?

Chris: I had started doing the singer-songwriter thing, performing under my name. I was recording with a band and we were doing a show with his band and I had come to the enlightenment that my band needed a new player. We struck-up a conversation. I knew immediately, just by how we interacted, our ideas on how a band should be run, our ideas on how you make a live show pop and connect, that we would gel.

It’s important to gel isn’t it.  I mean it’s like being married, being in a band.

Rick: Yeah, four times over.

Only without the good parts.

Rick: Yeah, it’s really just the hate part. (laughs) You get the love on stage.

From a vibe thing, Chris and I were definitely happening. What was interesting to me from the very beginning was the fact that I do come from such a different musical place that it’s really is good for me. Your instincts are to go searching for like people, people that are like you. What that tends to get you is people who validate your idea structure but it doesn’t really stretch you in anyway. It doesn’t challenge you. So the fact that Chris and I were so different, it was a huge challenge and that’s the part of it I liked. I figured that would translate into the music and I think it has because the convergence of the styles. Hopefully people will hear that.

Tell me about your debut album The Nights You Lost Your Voice. That’s a long title.CD Cover

Chris: I love the title. I like what it means. There are so many different reasons why you lose your voice. You could be extremely emotionally betrayed so you just can’t even talk, or you could be so excited and happy, like from being at a show where you’re singing along, where you so ecstatic to the point where you’re beyond words. Or it could be more figurative, like politically we have lost our voice as Americans because we have a fucking schmuck making decisions for us.

Each of the songs on the record has ties to that whether it’s in a relationship, or you're ecstatic or it’s in a situation that you encounter, or politically. Rick and I are extremely emotional. We both tend to wear our hearts on our sleeve. This record is that; I think it’s all about that.

Chris are you the primary songwriter?

Chris: That’s always an interesting question. For most of the songs I start with an acoustic guitar in a room by myself. But they were shells. I come in and Rick will be like, “I’m not feeling it, but I love that idea.” So we come together and we start to shape it and that’s not only true of the music but that’s true of the lyrics. We try to make it better so it gets torn apart. That’s why we both get credit for songwriting.

About A.L. Harper