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Hypnosis Helps: Self-Hypnosis

As a way to heal the body through the mind’s power, hypnotherapy gives you the opportunity to go into a deeply relaxing, meditative state or trance. The true benefit of hypnotherapy? It allows your conscious mind and subconscious mind to work together as a team – instead of working on auto-pilot and contradicting one another’s intentions. Perhaps your friend has tried it or your uncle and vouch for its ability to heal their smoking habit but you’re still not sure. Going into a trance, you think? However farfetched hypnotherapy may sound, it has been used as a quantum healing technique for centuries and in many countries and continents all over the world as a way to protect, heal, and nurture the sick. Explore hypnotherapy and discover how it can truly shift the health of your own body and mind to work in harmony.

Not Just for Magicians Anymore

Hypnotherapy has been around for centuries, but in the 1700s, it really had its day: in the late 1700s, the entire country of France was mesmerized by the theory that we are the effect of magnetism, SO MUCH SO that magicians started using Mesmer’s “demonstrations” for their own gain. Sure, today you may see David Copperfield hypnotize an audience member, but we’ve come a long way from the “entertainment” days of hypnosis. It’s very real and because of the shift in consciousness, we can create a new life, new body for ourselves simply by having new thoughts. 

Hypnosis to Happiness

So what is hypnosis good for, specifically? And, what isn’t it? Hypnosis has been an alternative quantum healing practice for people in the Western world lately, although it took quite a while for their scientifically charged reality to get a good look at the wonders of this practice. It can and does on a regular basis heal chronic  back pain, insomnia, smoking habits, weight loss, sexual difficulties, heart disease, drug or alcohol use, shingles, low self-confidence, arthritis, migraines, and more, as well as getting you back on your spiritual track. 

It has been very successful (for the open-minded and accepting patient) in helping uncover past life memories and painful childhood memories; helping with the management of some addictive behaviors and “remembering” where they came from or have been triggered from; irritable bowel syndrome; the improvement of memory; and stress management. Although the media hasn’t always shed the best light on hypnotherapy practices (which is often the case with alternative forms of medicine) hypnotherapy can and does work, given a trusted professional and patience. Often, this type of healing may take several sessions for the patient, while others find immediate results. Tired of your addiction to food or cigarettes? Give hypnosis a try. Want to be the first to go to college in your family but need a confidence boost? Hypnosis can help. 

How to Perform Self-Hypnosis 

Self-hypnosis can be done easily, quickly, and pain-free in the privacy of your home. If you are shy about seeing someone to perform a hypnosis session for you or just want to try it yourself for the first time, give it a go. Remember, you’re safe while in this relaxed state. When you use self-hypnosis, you are guiding yourself with your own intuition and knowing, rather than from a logical and intellectual standpoint.  It’s completely natural and has been done since practically the beginning of time. Expect to improve your level of concentration and be in a quiet and uninterrupted place. Sit or lie down; however, if you lie down be careful you don’t fall asleep! 

  1. Just as you would during a meditation session, try your best to rid yourself of all distractions. That is, make sure you will be undisturbed for 30 minutes to an hour. Begin to deep-breathe and as thoughts come into your mind, accept them and refocus your attention on the pace of your breath. Concentrate on your body and how you feel. Are you tense? Do you feel stress anymore? Begin with your toes and imagine the stress melting away, then your knees, your thighs, stomach, arms, nose, etc. With each body part, imagine the stress disappearing as you begin to feel lighter and lighter. It can help to think of your “happy place” – a soothing memory or a made up place that leaves you feeling serene, calm. Go there. 
  2. As you feel more relaxed than you remember feeling in a while, use your visualization skills. Think of a flight of stairs, which ultimately lead underwater. As you take each step, notice how relaxed and at peace you feel with yourself and with the world. With each step, you feel more relaxed than ever before. As you touch the water, you feel its cool sensation calm you even more and any worries you have drift away with the gentle tide. At this point, you may feel like you’re floating on water (this is a good sign of major relaxation taking place!). All of a sudden, you see three wrapped gifts under the water. This is when you should repeat positive affirmations as you open the gifts. Some suggestions? “I no longer need cigarettes to feel better,” or “I feel thin and confidently radiant.” Repeat these statements as many times as possible, but at least three times each.
  3. Now it’s time to go back up the stairs you came down. Feel yourself climbing out of the water and begin making your way up.  Soon, you see a large, beautiful door that is your gateway back to consciousness. As you come closer to it, begin repeating to yourself, “Wake up now, wake up.” As you open your eyes, do it slowly and carefully. Taking your time becoming conscious is the most important step. 

Through an altered state of consciousness, hypnosis allows your subconscious mind to work alongside your conscious mind to produce results. It doesn’t matter if you have reoccurring chronic shoulder pain from an accident you were involved with years ago or if you haven’t been able to sleep for the past four nights due to nightmares. You can overcome these ailments and more in a healthy and constructive way. Give this quantum healing practice a try – hypnosis really does help. 

About Jill Magso