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High Gas Prices: Is Bush to blame? or “Houston We Have a Problem!”

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George W. Bush was elected twice with the key help of the major oil
companies’ contributions to his campaign. In other words he owed them big time.

Early on in the planning concerning the war on Iraq, the original concept was simply to topple Saddam and put someone else in charge who would be friendlier towards the U.S. in the region. That would mean someone strong enough to keep the opposing factions in line, but more importantly someone who’d allow a few little (hardly even noticed, or worth mentioning) U.S. strategic military bases on Iraqi soil. These bases would be close enough to major targets in the area without endangering Israel becoming an object of retaliation, because the attacks were launched from Iraq.
The U.S. would become a major influence in the Middle East, we’d become a major factor in the control of Iraq’s huge oil reserves and of setting their oil prices, and maybe finally forcing a peace that GW could take credit for. A good enough plan, even an admirable plan from the Bush White House.

But remember a big favor hangs over Bush’s head for financing him into the Oval Office!

Many outraged editorials were written after the beginning of the U.S. led invasion of Iraq about Bush just wanting the oil reserves for his buddies in Texas, but we’ve all been misled. The major powers that be in Houston not only didn’t want possession of the oil reserves in Iraq, they didn’t want anyone else to have them either.

Yes you read that right!

Originally the plan was to invade Iraq and release its huge oil reserves to the world market, plummeting oil prices, and then breaking the back and sabotaging the stranglehold that OPEC has on the world market. Bush would be a hero after gasoline prices dipped back to or even below a dollar a gallon, the economy would explode when Americans suddenly had more buying power, and GW would probably have a giant “Saddamesque” statue erected of himself in national mall that would rival the Washington Monument.

Why was the plan sidelined in 2003?
Bush needed/wanted/craved/coveted reelection in 2004, and, without big oil’s financial backing, that was simply not going to happen. Can you imagine the outrage in Houston when they caught wind of the White Houses’ plan? They weren’t about to let “good ole’ boy” Bush interfere with their own plans to completely suppress Iraq’s oil reserves, because if they were released, those record-breaking, obscene, and unimaginable oil company profits that everyone’s so outraged about lately (except rich Republican stock holders that is) would evaporate in mid air; that’s why!

Forget the Space Center-High oil prices are what Houston’s all about!

Can you imagine an oil company executive sitting on the stand in a courtroom, sworn under oath, and trying to convince a judge or jury that he thought that low oil prices were good for America? Our beloved George W. Bush had a perfect opportunity to make himself a hero in the eyes of all Americans (even me) by getting oil flowing and into production fast) bringing down the price of oil, but he didn’t, obviously because his “owners” had other ideas.

Now there’s the argument (read convenient excuse) that gas prices are so high, because we don’t have the refinery capacity to convert the abundance of crude that’s available.
I agree, they’re right, we don’t.

But it’s not because…
A} The “leftist tree-hugging environmentalists” are screaming their heads off about local land and water pollution that would result from a major refinery being built anywhere.

B} Because we can’t drill in the eastern Gulf of Mexico or set up additional refineries there because the Governor of Florida (some guy named Bush) doesn’t want to risk messing up the gulf coast’s beaches for tourists.

C} We can’t drill in the Alaska pristine wilderness even if the real reason they want to is because it’d all be sold to China and India anyway and NOT the U.S.

D} It’s not even the fault of rich Republican billionaires sitting in their mansions yelling “Not in my back yard you don’t! You’ll lower my property values!”

It is because it’s in the oil companies’ best interest to their huge bottom lines and rich stockholders not to increase refinery capacity. Every time an existing refinery goes down, it becomes another excuse to raise already obscene gas prices and, by coincidence, their profits.

Now the argument has also been put forward that gas pump prices are much higher in other countries, and that the United States is unfairly paying less, thus we should pay more.
In actual fact, worldwide, we pay about the same as everyone else before taxes per gallon.
For instance the tax on a gallon of gas in the United Kingdom is currently $3.40, bringing it to $5.89 a gallon!

In the U.S. in cents we pay total per gallon at the pump by state…
Alabama 39.4
Alaska 26.4
Arizona 37.4
Arkansas 40.1
California 50.4
Colorado 40.4
Connecticut 48.1
Delaware 41.4
Dist. of Columbia 38.4
Florida 48
Georgia 30.6
Hawaii 53.5
Idaho 43.4
Illinois 48.4
Indiana 36.5
Iowa 39.5
Kansas 42.4
Kentucky 39.8
Louisiana 38.4
Maine 41.9
Maryland 41.9
Massachusetts 39.9
Michigan 44.6
Minnesota 38.4
Mississippi 37.2
Missouri 35.4
Montana 46.2
Nebraska .8
Nevada 51.7
New Hampshire 39
New Jersey 32.9
New Mexico 36.4
New York 48.7
North Carolina 40.8
North Dakota 39.4
Ohio 40.4
Oklahoma 35.4
Oregon 42.4
Pennsylvania 45.1
Rhode Island 49.4
South Carolina 35.2
South Dakota 42.4
Tennessee 39.8
Texas 38.4
Utah 42.9
Vermont 38.4
Virginia 37.3
Washington 41.4
West Virginia 43.8
Wisconsin 49.5
Wyoming 32.4
U.S. Average 42
As you can see, it’s not our fault that in other countries, they pay waaaaaay more than us!

The oil companies have one idol that they worship above all others-the botom line. They figure we’ll get used to paying $4 a gallon, and they’ll look like heroes when they lower prices back down to $2.99.9 a gallon, and we’ll be dumb enough to praise them!

Meanwhile we’ve gotten used to planning our family budgets around the price of gas. The best way to describe the pain at the pump would be if you went to the grocery store one day, and suddenly the price of milk, eggs, beef, and beer suddenly doubled from what it was just two years ago, and what if a week later it doubled again?

The American people plan their lives around travel, and we’ve become comfortable with the fact that we can come and go at will, to see relatives, go to and from work and church, and have the freedom of independent movement.
Now, suddenly we’re having 30-60 dollars a month taken out of an already tight budget. This is going to affect our spending power, and this is going to impact our economy. To compensate, shipping companies are going to have to violate contracts and raise shipping charges. Everything in the American economy is delivered in big trucks that use lots of fuel. Stores will have to raise prices to offset the fuel charges.

So you see we’re not only being hit in the gas tank, but again in the wallet for daily purchases as well. We can’t afford other things, so we buy less, they can afford to ship less, wage demands go up, and profits go down.

Meanwhile the fat cats in Houston just sit back, puff on their cigars, straighten their Stetsons and smile in the comfort that they’ve got a president in their pocket and the world by the balls.

Know why? I’ll tell you, it’s because everyone’s blaming the A-rabs for gas going up, and not including Texas oil men in that blame. Every time the cartel raises prices Houston smiles, and so do their banks.

Think of it, an entity in the United States of America, dominant enough to slap down a driven, self-serving, self righteous President like George W. Bush, and powerful enough to keep him from much sought after love and regard from the American People, such as no leader has, or maybe never will see.

Now that’s something!

Is Bush to blame, you’re damn right he is for bowing to the oil industry’s bottom line.

Of course that’s only my opinion!

About Jet Gardner

I like collecting books, music, movies, chess sets and friends
  • http://bloggingontheedgeofsuicide.blogspot.com/ Jet

    Now if you want to see a really great car, check out my current one-the red Chrysler Sebring Convertible that you scrolled past to find the Spitfires.

    Thanks for the company

    I’ve got an appointment at noon and it’s 3:42AM here and I think I’m sufficiently exhausted to possibly fall asleep now.

    thanks for helping me rack up all those comments!
    (which I could really care less about)
    G’nite mate

    g’night Suss… (:^p~~~~~~~~~~~~

  • bliffle

    Even if the Federal moratorium on OCS drilling is lifted, there are still State moratoriums that prevent drilling. For example, the California moratorium has bipartisan support and won’t be repealed, and that’s about 1/3 of the OCS oil, IIRC.

    But The Fools Of America have jumped to attention to do the oil company bidding and start screaming for OCS/ANWR contracts which are favorable to the oil cos and grossly unfavorable to the USA.

    Are any of you that foolish?

  • http://bloggingontheedgeofsuicide.blogspot.com/ Jet

    I’d agree with you Bliff, but Suss might think I was running up my comment count again…

  • http://bloggingontheedgeofsuicide.blogspot.com/ Jet

    You know, it’s suddenly dawned on me why everyone’s having a hissy fit about me constantly reviving this article. It’s because someone might realize that I was right and actually read the damned thing.

    Two years ago, I was right about…

    A:

    Many outraged editorials were written after the beginning of the U.S. led invasion of Iraq about Bush just wanting the oil reserves for his buddies in Texas, but we’ve all been misled. The major powers that be in Houston not only didn’t want possession of the oil reserves in Iraq, they didn’t want anyone else to have them either

    B. Houston wasn’t

    …about to let “good ole’ boy” Bush interfere with their own plans to completely suppress Iraq’s oil reserves, because if they were released, those record-breaking, obscene, and unimaginable oil company profits that everyone’s so outraged about lately (except rich Republican stock holders that is) would evaporate in mid air; that’s why!

    C. I was branded an idiot in 2006 when I predicted gas at the pump would hit $4…

    They figure we’ll get used to paying $4 a gallon, and they’ll look like heroes when they lower prices back down to $2.99.9 a gallon, and we’ll be dumb enough to praise them!

    D. I even predicted this…

    Meanwhile we’ve gotten used to planning our family budgets around the price of gas. The best way to describe the pain at the pump would be if you went to the grocery store one day, and suddenly the price of milk, eggs, beef, and beer suddenly doubled from what it was just two years ago, and what if a week later it doubled again?

    E. Two years ago I said:

    Now, suddenly we’re having 30-60 dollars a month taken out of an already tight budget. This is going to affect our spending power, and this is going to impact our economy. To compensate, shipping companies are going to have to violate contracts and raise shipping charges. Everything in the American economy is delivered in big trucks that use lots of fuel. Stores will have to raise prices to offset the fuel charges.

    Now I understand why Sussman and others are so upset that this article is as relevant as it was two years ago as it is today.

  • bliffle

    Jet,

    Congrats. I reread the article a couple weeks ago and was surprised at the pertinence of some of your predictions.

  • Clavos

    I…was surprised at the pertinence of some of your predictions.

    …Except of course, for his central premise that the oil companies, not the producers and market supply/demand, control the price of oil.

  • http://bloggingontheedgeofsuicide.blogspot.com/ Jet

    Oh, because you say so Clavos?

  • http://bloggingontheedgeofsuicide.blogspot.com/ Jet

    You’ll notice Clavos hoped we wouldn’t notice his sidestep and distraction by refusing to respond to #504.

    Sad really…

  • Clavos

    Oh, because you say so Clavos?

    That playground response doesn’t really merit a reply, but I don’t know any better, so here goes:

    Yes, I and:

    The Weekly Standard.

    And:

    The Wall Street Journal.

    And:

    The American Spectator.

    Over the past several weeks, I have bookmarked a lot more articles in the same vein, but BC only permits 3 citations per comment, so these will have to do for starters.

  • http://bloggingontheedgeofsuicide.blogspot.com/ Jet

    What part of the comment was wrong Clavos? Wait,I’ll go see if I can find a few websites that agree with me…

    pretty obvious distraction.

    You’re right gas never hit 4 bucks a gallon, it was higher than that.

    poor man, afraid your oil stocks will go down if you don’t dispute an obvious truth?

  • http://jetspolitics.blogspot.com/ Jet

    As I said on the other string Clavos, calling me childish first doesn’t make you the adult in the conversation.

    I can find 20 people to say you’re making an ass of yourself, and you can do the same.

    that doesn’t make either of us right, just more clever at a comeback.

  • bliffle

    Jet,

    Congrats. I reread the article a couple weeks ago and was surprised at the pertinence of some of your predictions.

  • http://jetspolitics.blogspot.com/ Jet

    Thanks again Bliffle?

  • http://jetspolitics.blogspot.com/ Jet

    Thank God congress is out of session; can you imagine where gas price would be if someone had talked them into coming back?

  • http://jetsnewsviews.blogspot.com/ Jet

    BAGHDAD (AFP) — Iraq on Tuesday cleared a plan to develop an oil field by China Petroleum National Corp. at a service fee of six dollars a barrel, giving Beijing a foothold into the world’s third largest oil reserves.

    Iraqi Oil Minister Hussein al-Shahristani said the cabinet had approved the three-billion-dollar deal that will see China’s state-owned company developing the Al-Ahdab oil field in the central Shiite province of Wasit.

    “The Chinese company will charge six dollars per barrel of production as service fees which would decrease gradually to three dollars,” Shahristani told reporters inside Baghdad’s heavily fortified Green Zone.

    He said the plan is to be produce 25,000 barrels of oil per day in the first three years.

    Amazing, I must be clairvoyant.

  • http://jetsnewsviews.blogspot.com/ Jet

    Forgive me if I’m wrong, but didn’t we deserve “first dibbs” on Iraqi oil?

  • bliffle

    That was then, this is now.

    This is about business, not patriotism.

  • http://jetsnewsviews.blogspot.com/ Jet

    I’ve been saying all along Bliffle that the Chinese will get first dibbs on everything. I hate being proven right though.

  • troll

    not to worry jet – there’s plenty there to make all the fat cats a bit fatter

  • http://jetsnewsviews.blogspot.com/ Jet

    Oh c’mon now Troll, let’s not get into Science Fiction… Fatter? … oh you mean their wallets.

  • http://jetsnewsviews.blogspot.com/ Jet

    Though not unexpected, isn’t that deal like Iraq is spitting in our faces. Especially with the billions they have sitting in U.S. banks from their oil revenue… while we lay out tens of billions to Haliburten to rebuild the infrastructure?

  • bliffle

    They have about $80billion in oil revenues in the bank.

    We should pull out.

  • http://jetsnewsviews.blogspot.com/ Jet

    Iraq could finish the year with as much as a $79 billion cumulative budget surplus as oil revenues add to leftover income the Iraqis still haven’t spent on national rebuilding, according to a report by the Government Accountability Office made public Tuesday.

    Many Iraqis — who lack adequate electricity, clean water and jobs — find it unfathomable their country is awash in oil dollars. Last year, it spent less than a third of the $12 billion budgeted for major projects such as electricity, housing and water.

    In Washington, senators renewed calls for Baghdad to pay more for its own reconstruction, which has been heavily supported by hard-pressed American taxpayers.

    “I think it’s absurd that we’re paying for the reconstruction in a country when right at the beginning of the war the Bush administration assured the American people that Iraq’s reconstruction would be paid for by Iraq and through its oil revenues,” Democratic Sen. Carl Levin said Wednesday on MSNBC

  • http://jetsnewsviews.blogspot.com/ Jet

    In the Houston area, a city of 2.2 million inhabitants about 50 miles inland, authorities were braced for a potential catastrophe. The city’s compact downtown is a clutch of vulnerable, glass-encased skyscrapers that house headquarters for some of the world’s largest energy companies.

    Local journalists were reporting glass blown out from office towers and debris in the streets. The east side of the 75-story J.P.Morgan Chase tower — Houston’s tallest building at 1,000-feet — had many windows blown out, with office materials and other debris dangling.

    At Hobby Airport near downtown Houston, wind gusts of 100 mph were recorded around 7 a.m. Creeks and bayous in the downtown area were cresting and people were warned to stay inside. The famous Buffalo Bayou, which meanders through downtown Houston, was beginning to overtop its banks with some water washing onto the road.

    Some streets in the south reportedly were covered with a foot or more of water.

    Much of the city appeared to be without power and Mayor Bill White in a news conference Saturday warned residents to boil their water until water quality could be assured. He said city crews had no evidence that the water system was contaminated but it had lost pressure and needed to be tested.

    Several fires burned unattended in Houston Saturday morning and 911 operators received about 1,250 calls in 24 hours, Frank Michel, spokesman for White, told the AP.

    A well-known restaurant, Brennan’s of Houston, was destroyed in a blaze after firefighters were thwarted by high winds. A worker there and his daughter were badly burned and taken to a local hospital.