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Game Review: Eye Know

Many trivia games are very abstract, as they depend on reading questions aloud, potentially mixing up a guesser. Since the human brain is a cobweb of connecting points, without a primary point to begin, a player may have no hope of remembering the right answer even if he or she in fact knew it somewhere in the back of memory. Mensa Select-winner Eye Know from Wiggles 3D games takes trivia to a new level with visual clues and gameplay like none other. Eye Know is set up with a board of 12 cards, each facing up with a famous image.…

Review Overview

"Trivia for Your Eyes"

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Many trivia games are very abstract, as they depend on reading questions aloud, potentially mixing up a guesser. Since the human brain is a cobweb of connecting points, without a primary point to begin, a player may have no hope of remembering the right answer even if he or she in fact knew it somewhere in the back of memory. Mensa Select-winner Eye Know from Wiggles 3D games takes trivia to a new level with visual clues and gameplay like none other.

EyeKnowGameEye Know is set up with a board of 12 cards, each facing up with a famous image. They are organized by color with orange leaning more toward businesses and geography, purple more pop culture historical and present, green for life and earth sciences, and blue for engineering and food. With the grid-pattern, players have up to twelve choices for which topic they would like to pick, decreasing the frustration sometimes seen in trivia games of being stuck with an obscure question.

In basic play, players take turn rolling the two dice, coming up with a color category to choose from and a numbered die to determine the type of question: true/false, multiple choice, or open-ended. The player picks a card by naming what is on it and gets to play only if his or her guess is correct, a trivia question even before the real question that prompts players to work within their zone of knowledge. At the end of five rounds, the player who has successfully answered the most questions wins.

For more adventurous players, Eye Know has alternative “Classic” rules with betting chips. The game progresses the same with rolling dice, choosing cards, but chips raise the stakes. Players must bet at least one chip that they are correct and can go up to as many as five if they are certain of answers. The fifty-fifty odds on True/False questions only return the same payout, but the more difficult Multiple choice and the Open-Ended give impressive payouts. Players may even cash in sets of cards for bonus chips, and the player with the most chips at the end of the five rounds is the winner.

Eye Know is a trivia game for two or more players aged twelve and up, which is appropriate for the difficulty of the questions. Alternate rules make the game simpler for younger players by eliminating the dice and allowing players to pick the images and types of questions they want. Games are typically short, about twenty to thirty minutes depending on the number of players, which is a refreshing change from intensive trivia matches that can last for hours.

The set comes with four hundred cards, each with a unique image and three questions, making for a long time of playing before a question is repeated. Trivia-lovers may take the game beyond the basic set with the iPad app. The app gives 150 new cards as well as a new dimension to the game with distorted images that gradually clear, making for rapid-fire guessing to determine what it is before the timer runs out.

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About Jeff Provine

Jeff Provine is a Composition professor, novelist, cartoonist, and traveler of three continents. His latest book is a collection of local ghost legends, Campus Ghosts of Norman, Oklahoma.