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Frédérique Doyon on Dali and Bonet

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It has been a long weekend. A very long weekend. Apologies for not writing more. One of the things I missed was this 717 word article in Le Devoir about the current show at the Musée d’art de Mont-Saint-Hilaire. It seems that they have got their hands on eight percent of the prints that Dali made in his lifetime. They have then added some sculptures by Jordi Bonet to make it a show.

Might be worth a trip to the country, might not.

Posted by Zeke from Zeke’s Gallery to Zeke’s Gallery at 7/18/2004 10:56:10 PM

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  • Shark

    Warning to visitors:

    “Eight percent of the prints that Dali made in his lifetime” probably consists of about 99% fakes.

    Just visited a Dali “gallery show” here in Fort Worth — probably half the items for sale were fakes, imo. (Dali would have loved that — and actually encouraged it, btw!)

    It’s everywhere.

    Caveat emptor

    (BTW: It’s Dali’s “Centennial” (b. 1904) so go pay homage to this god of 20th century art somewhere safe like the museum in St. Pete, Florida.)

  • Eric Olsen

    My friend inherited a large number of expensive paintings and decided to auction off most of them (to fund a house remodel) and about 10% turned out to be fake.

  • Shark

    A good friend and ex-coworker — one of the great art historians in the world today — estimates about 30% of the works in major art museums are fakes.

    BTW: Christies and Sothebys aren’t above a little provenance tweaking; the thing is, it behooves everyone involved in art commerce, ie sellers, galleries, art museum curators, auction houses to fake famous provenances — behooves everyone BUT the buyer or collector; they’re the ones who get screwed.

    Tis some risky business to be an art buyer.

    Fascinating stuff, and I suggest anyone interested read up on Elmyr de Hory and Bernard Berenson for some more mind-boggling info.