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Field Negroes Strike Again!

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This article is part of a series in celebration of a new, dynamic voice in Black America: the NUBIANO Exchange. Brace yourself for the NUBIANO experience. 

  by Seke Ballard

In the Presidential race the Democratic front-runner is a charismatic, bright and well-achieved man who has garnered the tacit support of arguably the most intelligent publication in all of Europe, The Economist, and a substantial number of American voters. Oddly enough, black Americans don’t fall into the mass of supporters itching to cast their ballots for Barack Obama. The most obvious question is why? And, however unfortunate, the most obvious answer is because of the oft-referenced ‘crab mentality’ of blacks. 

A credible theory that explains crab mentality among blacks points to the division of work during slavery. Generally stated, there was a strong positive correlation between how light a slave was and the likelihood that they would work in the house as maids, butlers and/or cooks – instead of being in the field with darker slaves. Typically, those who worked closer to the owners in the home were privy to better food, clothing, shelter and overall treatment. For this reason, domesticated slaves were often more accommodating to whites and accepting of their subordinate status as blacks in society. The result was a mixture of jealousy and hatred of the so-called "house Negroes" by the so-called "field Negroes." 

Not surprisingly, this phenomenon exists to this day. In a recent Washington Post-ABC News poll, 20% of black Democrats surveyed supported Obama while an impressive 60% supported Hillary Clinton. The justification for favoring Clinton over Obama: 

“When black Americans refer to Obama as ‘one of us,’ I do not know what they are talking about.” — Stanley Couch

“Obama isn’t black…I’ve got nothing but love for the brother, but we don’t have anything in common…His father was African. His mother was a white woman. He grew up with white grandparents.” — Debra J. Dickerson, Salon

The issue that I have with these statements and this general sentiment is not so much that they don’t support the “black” candidate, but more so with the claims’ dubious nature. Apart from holding Obama hostage for being a mixed child, to state that his racial makeup made him any less subject to racial discrimination and the ‘black experience’ outside the home is absurd. The doorway of Obama’s childhood home, just as any other black child’s, marked the threshold separating unconditional familial support from discrimination in the world at large. Red Neck Joe from Boondocks, State X didn’t take the time to survey Obama’s history and family makeup before casting a wondering eye in the local market. So why think that his experience was any different? 

Simple. Because the field Negroes, once again, have been sippin’ on their Haterade®. They've established this unreasonable idea of blackness that punishes balanced and long-term political perspective that is rightfully not militantly pro-black and opportunistic. However, paradoxically, this same critical group of people rewards reverends with perms, over-sized egos and rhetoric that could put Mother Goose to shame. Just as during slavery, a person’s blackness is being called into question for largely invalid reasons. The result is an unfortunate illustration of how blacks continue to perpetuate their own mental enslavement. My advice: if you happen to be a field Negro, take a step back and analyze exactly why you don’t support Obama. If it’s because he’s light-skinned and privileged, chances are you’ll need to do some soul searching. If it’s because he’s overly accommodating and accepting of his position as a black man in society, then you’re probably on solid ground.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES:

Hutchinson, Earl Ofari. "Why Blacks Won't Necessarily Back Obama". Christian Science Monitor, 29 January 2007.

Bacon, Perry. "Can Obama Count On the Black Vote?". TIME Magazine, 23 January 2007.

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About Clayton Perry

  • Arch Conservative

    “Apart from holding Obama hostage for being a mixed child, to state that his racial makeup made him any less subject to racial discrimination and the ‘black experience’ outside the home is absurd.”

    When people point htis out I don’t think they’re doing it to imply that Obama has never been viewed as or treated as a black person but rather it is just done to point out that as a matter of fact he is half black and half white and this may be viewed by some as different from being all white or all black.

    I find it hypocritical that so many on the left claim not to be racial demagougues and then they use views on prominent black Democrats as a litmus test on race. (IE if you don’t support someone like Obama you must be a racist) However we never see these same people applying the test to prominent black Republicans like Colin Powell or Condaleeza Rice. In fact the opposite is true. Many rabid leftists exhibit their own racist tendencies themselves by calling people like Rice and Powell Uncle Tom’s or house negros simply because they are not leftists themselves.

  • Lumpy

    It’s amusing how the autthor of this piece, in an effort to address the issue of obama’s race makes some pretty damned racist comments of his own.

    Black anericans aren’t going to get anywhere until they stop thinking in the terms of slavery. It also doesn’t help anything to perpetuate the bigotes stereotype of the white ‘redneck’ a term which approaches the ‘N word’ in its level of pure racism, yet blacka and leftists can get away with using it with impunity.

  • JustOneMan

    Blacks who cling on to the slavery issue are nothing but failures who are unwilling to take ressponsibilities for their themselves. In addition much like some of the Jews who use the holacaust to justify their arrogance they perpetuate the sterotypes continuing the cycle of prejudice.

    JOM

  • http://ruvysroost.blogspot.com Ruvy in Jerusalem

    In essence, this author is calling on blacks to “get over slavery.” He analyzes blacks’ attitudes towards Barak Obama from the point of view of how they have not gotten over the slave mentality they lived with for several centuries on the North American continent.

    I think this article was intelligently written and well reasoned. And I learned something I never really knew about black culture. Thanks!

  • Sisyphus

    “…from the point of view of how they have not gotten over the slave mentality….”

    Thus, is there an implication that whites have likewise not gotten over the “slave owner” mentality? Food for thought.

  • Arch Conservative

    “Thus, is there an implication that whites have likewise not gotten over the “slave owner” mentality? Food for thought.”

    Unfortunately the answer to that is probably yes sissywuss, some whites have not gotten over the slave owner mentality. I wouldn’t say all whites just like I wouldn’t say all blacks have yet to get over slavery as some clearly have.

    Anyone of any color or race can find all kinds of bullshit excuses for their own shortcomings in life. Life presents obstacles to so many people regardless of color or race but the simple fact is that there are millions of successful Americans of all different races who have come from many different socioeconomic backgrounds. I tend to sympathize with those who at least try to better their lives through their own actions rather than blaming society from the get go.

    Excuses are for losers and liberals (losers and liberals, that’s kind of redundant).

  • sr

    Like I have said before on this issue, it will never end until the end of the world. How sad but true and to think otherwise is foolish. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr was a wonderful man and to see his dream never come to fruitation should give us pause. Just wonder what Dr. King would think of Jessie Jackson or Al Sharpton. They are just two of the three Stooges. Wonder who the third is.

  • steve

    obama is of AFRICAN heritage, which many people do not know. The culture passed down by his father is totally different than that of african-americans, which has permeated for generations. this could provide a good reason why he is lagging behind hillary in the poles. he doesn’t truly represent the black community while the black community DID identify with the philosophy of Bill Clinton.
    I can’t see how he can possibly get into office with an Islamic heritage passed down from his father and grandfather.His brother is a practicing Muslim.
    Part of me wonders if that would be a greater threat to the country…or if it could possibly bridge us to the middle east moreso than where we are now? any ideas?

  • sb

    Although I’m white…I didn’t appreciate the term “field negro” used by the author. Just because the author is black, does that give him the license to use the term by his interpretation? ) (i.e. the use of nigg (a) (er) )
    I found it to be caustic and offensive. so who by definition would be a “house negro” condy rice? colin powell? alan keys? I suppose african american conservatives in general. NOT RIGHT!
    By using such a term, you are implying that within your OWN race, you have inferiority complexes. why cant you see “house negroes” as african-americans with hard-working conservative values? In doing so, you display a “woe is to me” attitude blaming your shortcomings on white people, or anyone of a higher socio-economic status than yourself. have some dignity.

  • Sisyphus

    AC: “Excuses are for losers and liberals (losers and liberals, that’s kind of redundant).”

    Arch, I was agreeing with you 100% until you had to throw in this last remark. It is counter-productive and offensive.

  • STM

    I can’t work out why americans just can’t get colour blind, especially now, when divisions are the last thing you need. Seriously, who gives a rat’s? It’s 2007, there are people all around the globe plotting the downfall of America by killing americans of all colours – black (of whatever shade), white (suntans included), yellow, red, orange, green or pink polka fu.king dot. There couldn’t be a better time to bury the past forever and work towards a society that is truly American and truly inclusive. Remaining stuck in the mid 1800s and talking about house negroes ain’t gonna help anyone move on. It’s a brave new world – no one should miss the opportunity, because it might not come round again.

  • Sisyphus

    “I can’t work out why americans just can’t get colour blind….”

    Probably much the same reason that Australians can’t. Attitudes that have been ingrained for generations take a long time to change. Racism is just as evident in Oz as it is here. I’ve lived in both places and seen discrimination in both places, sometimes subtle, sometimes not so subtle. It is definitely NOT unique to Americans.

  • Clavos

    Even Haiti, an all Black country, has racial discrimination. The lighter-skinned folks hold all the money and most of the power.

  • STM

    Sisyphus: “It is definitely NOT unique to Americans.”

    Who says it is, and why make everything a fu.king contest (what is it with you guys?) But racism here does take different forms. Australians are more likely to make judgments about the way a person acts and speaks than their skin colour. Aussie accent (and therefore supposedly Aussie values) = Aussie, period. No Aussie accent = all manner of derogatory comments, including wog, pom, chink, etc. However, the derogatory comments are often used as terms of endearment and personal address (ie: “Nick, you wog/pom/lebo/ bastard”) to those who have grown up here. Confusing to others, but not to us.

    Maybe that’s not the case among a very small minority, like our neo-Nazi nuts, but to most that is certainly the case and definitely my experience of growing up here. Jonathan Scanlan argues an interesting point in relation to this: that colour-blindness in Australia might actually and paradoxically be the result of the country’s old White Australia immigration policy, which kept out non-whites and ensured there was no cheap non-white immigrant pool of labour (apart from the 60,000 Pacific Island “kanakas” indentured and taken by “blackbirders” in the 19th century to work on the cane fields of North Queensland). However, today you’d have to say that the descendents of the islanders are totally and fully integrated into Australian society, and some are in fact notable and popular figures).

    It’s worth pondering, though; I recently heard a disparate group of Aussies in a pub – people of anglo/celtic, southern European, Asian and mid-eastern background, talking about the need to be wary of another guy: a pommy (English), their boss. It wasn’t because he was their boss, either. It was because he was English. It is quite different here, and if you say it ain’t, Sis, I say you’ve only visited for time, and been sheltered from it, rather than lived here.

  • Sisyphus

    “Who says it is [unique to Americans], and why make everything a fu.king contest….”

    It was your comment that you can’t understand why AMERICANS can’t get color blind, as if there is something peculiar about our nationality. Yes, racism takes different forms here and there. But if you claim, for example, in Australia there is no discrimination against Aborigines or resentment towards the influx of Asian immigrants, I’d have to wonder what part of Australia you call home. From my experience there (I lived for just over 3 years in Canberra), my judgement is that Australia is a very open, accepting society — it’s a great place to live and I have no criticism by way of comparison to life here in the States. Incidental racism both here and there is usually subtle and hard to qualify.

  • Zedd

    Lumpy

    You don’t know what racism is. Stop and study the topic first.

  • Zedd

    Clayton or Seke

    I don’t see the conflicted nature of AAs regarding Obama to be a House vs Field Niger issue.

    I think the issue is that he would not have been either because his ancestors are not African American. As the number of non African American Blacks permeate into the corporate and political sector (they will because they are highly educated), this issue will crop up over and over again.

    AAs are used to a simple definition of Blackness. Its getting more complicated. However over time, it will be a liberating force because 1)The immigrants and their children are more educated and worldly. They will improve how Blacks are perceived. After a generation with most African looking Blacks like West Africans, you cant spot the A factor :o) 2)They will permeate the corporate sector and make money. AAs will marry them and the entire community will evolve further. 3)The universe for AAs will expand and they will join the world as opposed to being defined by keeping it real about their over exaggerated hood affiliation. 4)Hatred by Blacks for blackness will diminish.

    It will take some time to get there with the Al Sharptons of our community still defining Blackness.

  • http://www.elitebloggers.com Dave Nalle

    Zedd, you clearly don’t know what racism is either. He had a valid point about the bigotry practiced against whites when they’re referred to by the ‘R Word’. Racism is NOT exclusively white on black. Far from it.

    Dave

  • Lumpy

    Zedd. Racism is just bigotry or discrimination based on race and as a gimpy american I know a lot about discrimination. Let me knw the next time the color of your skin keeps you from getting to a meeting because the elevator is being repaired and u can’t climb 3 flights of stairs.

  • STM

    Sis wrote: “I lived for just over 3 years in Canberra.”

    How on Earth did you manage to stay awake all that time Sis? And if you read my post in full, what I wrote about america getting colour-blind is that right now, there is a genuine threat to the wellbeing of the nation from the outside, so there’s never been a better time for people to come together. BTW, I know a bit about the indigenous community as I married into it, although none of us knew that at the time …

    My son grew up in a really nice part of Sydney, went to a couple of great schools where there were aboriginal boys both on full fees and scholarships from the country, and I must say, none of it has ever been an issue for him or any of his mates. He stayed with an aboriginal family in the bush on a rugby trip – and the dad picked it in one, pulling me aside at a barbecue and asking: “Is there a bit of bloody bush in that kid?”.

    It’s what people make it Sis … times have changed. Like I say, and you must have experienced this, because its now such a multicultural society, the real problem in Australia these days is not having at least a bit of an Aussie accent (or the ability to understand all the nuances) because it marks you out as a new arrival.

  • STM

    And Sis, I think the main resentment towards the influx of Asian immigrants relates to their, ah … driving skills. I don’t think the rest of it bothers people that much.

  • sr

    Like I said. Until the end of the world. The comments prove my point. What a frecking waste of my time making this comment. Who cares.

  • Zedd

    Dave and Lumpy

    Again you both don’t know what racism is. Prejudice is one thing and bigotry is another. None of them are the same as what racism is.

    You must be kidding about the word “redneck”. You mean you can discriminate by putting a name to low class people who are cruel and rude to others. That is a joke. Hey lets ban the word gangster. What about drug dealer. Hey what about thief, jerk, fool, wife beater?

    Lumpy

    I don’t know what a gimpy is but it doesn’t sound good. I am sorry about the challenges that it causes you. However we are discussing a particular topic and so I will express opinions based on that topic. I am not equating or comparing hurts or discriminations. Just discussing the topic at hand.

  • STM

    Lumpy has a very valid point, Zedd. Discrimination does take many forms – and most of them are based on appearance. Try telling lumpy he doesn’t know what it’s like to be discrimated against by potential employers, etc.

  • Sisyphus

    STM: “How on Earth did you manage to stay awake all that time Sis?”

    I amused myself by driving around on the wrong side of the street. Seriously, Canberra isn’t so bad — pretty laid back. Of course, a lot of government workers, the town being the capital.

    STM: “the real problem in Australia these days is not having at least a bit of an Aussie accent….”

    That is probably true here, too (well, not the Aussie accent bit, but non-native speakers. A lot of immigrants these days don’t even bother to learn English at all, which is an issue.). Funny, though I was born and raised in the U.S., more often than not, I was mistaken for British while I was down under. It took me about two years living there and I no longer heard an Aussie accent. Then it took another two years after returning to the States before I stopped calling everyone “mate.” :)

  • S.T.M

    Sis wrote: “Calling everyone “mate.”

    Lol. Yes, that’s a tough one … mate. I’ll just assure you too that I have a really tough time when I’m forced to drive on the wrong side of the road in the US, and I have nearly got myself killed a few times (or at least really worried a few people) :) How about in Oz the prodigious use of insults that would get you shot, punched or jailed anywhere else on the planet, but which in Australia are simply greetings or terms of endearment. It must be the convict DNA. Truly, I think we are a mad bunch … what were you doing here BTW? Working for the US govt in some capacity, or a journo perhaps? Academic even … ? Or none of the above.

  • http://www.elitebloggers.com Dave Nalle

    You must be kidding about the word “redneck”. You mean you can discriminate by putting a name to low class people who are cruel and rude to others. That is a joke. Hey lets ban the word gangster. What about drug dealer. Hey what about thief, jerk, fool, wife beater?

    With every word you demonstrate that you are as bitoted and racist as you accuse others of being. Not even knowing the origins of the term Redneck, you automatically use it as a perjorative, even defining it on that basis. You use it EXACTLY the way a bigoted white person might use the therm Nigger.

    The word ‘Redneck’ originates as a description for people of the working class who labored outdoors and thus had red skin on their necks from exposure to the sun. It wasn’t a negative term until elitist bigots began to use it as a way of describing members of the working class who they considered undesirable.

    From there people like you began using the word as a derrogatory term for “low class people who are cruel and rude to others” but applying it to anyone from a rural or southern background regardless of their actual beliefs.

    So tell me. How is condemning and reviling someone on their regional or cultural background different from doing it based on the color of their skin? How is ‘Redneck’ any less offensive than ‘Nigger’?

    Dave

  • Zedd

    Dave

    It is a description of a particular class of person. You yourself stated that it wasn’t negative in its origin. However many of the people from that class were cruel to Africans in America. It was the redneck type of person that you feared when walking to town. Its like that world over. In South Africa Rednecks are the same (except the word is in Dutch). So what you are saying is that we should acknowledge our experience with a certain type of White person because it may offend them? Sorry bud. Not gonna happen. Those days are waaaaaaay gone. Its a brave new world. WELCOME.

    The word is also used affectionately by many comedians btw. For many it is a source of pride.

    Nigger represents a violent and abusive system against a race of people. The word was used to intimidate Africans in America. Nigger was used by Rednecks to make Blacks uncomfortable.

    You really don’t know what racism is do you?

  • Sisyphus

    “…what were you doing here BTW?”

    Roughly 10 years ago, I was there as an I.T. consultant (non-gov’t) with a focus on providing rural Internet access.

  • http://www.morethings.com/log Al Barger

    Now, there may be some validity to the author’s point about black Americans being hung up on the Nubian vs high yeller crap, or all that internal School Daze stuff.

    On the other hand, I’d prefer to think that it is black folks actually properly discounting race, or at least the personal ethnic background of the candidates. Maybe a lot of black folks are looking at things in other and more substantive terms. What are their views on the issues? Which candidate would be a more credible commander in chief?

    It seems to me that the most obviously racist thing is to assume that black folks should automatically support the black candidate- or that their decision will be primarily based on race.

    Plus, the positive appeal of Obama seems to be about 99% racist to begin with. The only reason this empty suit of a freshman senator is even vaguely a serious candidate is because of white folks looking for a magic Negro to heal the world and assuage their white guilt.

  • http://www.elitebloggers.com Dave Nalle

    It is a description of a particular class of person. You yourself stated that it wasn’t negative in its origin.

    Neither was the ‘N’ word.

    However many of the people from that class were cruel to Africans in America.

    They certainly didn’t own slaves, and a good portion of the people put in that class come from ancestries and regions where there was no siginificant black population. It remains a slur because it’s applied across the board without regard to the actions of the individual.

    It was the redneck type of person that you feared when walking to town.

    In your opinion. You’re applying your definition of redneck universally to anyone you don’t like. It’s your equivalent of the ‘N’ word.

    So what you are saying is that we should acknowledge our experience with a certain type of White person because it may offend them?

    No, I’m saying that you shouldn’t apply that term indiscriminately to white people based on where they live or the mere fact that they’re white.

    The word is also used affectionately by many comedians btw. For many it is a source of pride.

    Just like black comedians use the ‘N’ word.

    Nigger represents a violent and abusive system against a race of people. The word was used to intimidate Africans in America. Nigger was used by Rednecks to make Blacks uncomfortable.

    Redneck has been used just as long by the monied elite, especially those from the north, to designate a class of inferior and exploited workers kept in economic servitude for centuries.

    You really don’t know what racism is do you?

    Between you and Moonraven I’m getting to see a whole lot of it, so I’m getting pretty familiar.

    Dave

  • Zedd

    Al

    I bet most people on BC don’t know what you are talking about. Good for you guy!!!

  • Sisyphus

    Al: “It seems to me that the most obviously racist thing is to assume that black folks should automatically support the black candidate- or that their decision will be primarily based on race.”

    Right on. And I’ve heard almost every talking head express surprise that the “black community” does not support Obama virtually 100%. I disagree with your view with regard to the “magic negro” theory, though, which is making the rounds. I’m not saying there might not be an element of this in a few people’s subconscious, but I think you’re over-analyzing the general public’s thought process, which is demonstrably shallow and incapable of such nuance. Your assumption that whites, individually or collectively, harbor guilt relating to the treatment of blacks is, by and large, just not true — and maybe a touch racist itself: whites think and feel this, blacks think and feel that, etc.

  • Clavos

    Your assumption that whites, individually or collectively, harbor guilt relating to the treatment of blacks is, by and large, just not true — and maybe a touch racist itself

    True.

  • STM

    Sis: “Roughly 10 years ago, I was there as an I.T. consultant (non-gov’t) with a focus on providing rural Internet access.”

    Must have been fun, having to work with Telstra :)

  • Zedd

    #31 Dave Dave Dave. Your arguments are just weak. You don’t care for truth or facts you just say whatever you think may pass.

    Besides when you dialogue with me, make sure to eat your Wheaties. I wont even bother to respond to that rubbish. None of it actually had any real relevance. Just point after point of nothingness.

    Catch you next time. You used to be better. Your getting weak. Whats going on? Are you living right?

  • Seke Ballard

    Howdy folks,

    I’m excited that the article generated such a spirited debate. While browsing through your comments, however, there were a few points that I felt were inadequately addressed via the “natural process” of comment driven dialogue:

    1) At no point in time in the article did I insist that support for Obama be a litmus test for one’s blackness nor do I suggest that all blacks should support him. What I do claim, however, is that those who use his lack of blackness as a reason not to support him are flat out wrong. This is the case for two reasons: 1) his experience growing up, as I explain in the article, was no difference from any other black childs’. He was treated by everyone like a light-skinned black boy and thus his experience was molded by these environmental treatments. 2) It’s racist. If you choose not to support a candidate, do so based on their policy. Any other reason makes a baffoon out of the person doing the supporting.

    2) On the term redneck. I agree with the commenter on the origin of redneck, but I disagree that we shouldn’t use it because of it’s origin. Most linguist would agree with me when I say that language is a fluid and living phenomenon. Words today, in many cases, are quite different from what they were 500 years ago. That said, the origin of a word doesn’t dictate its meaning as much as its current usage does. In that regard, the term redneck is no longer used to address working class men and women who got bad burns on their neck. Rather, it’s used to address caucasians who exhibit discriminatory behavior and “backward thinking” regarding certain groups of people and beliefs. In this sense, using the word redneck is in no way racists as it describes a behavior, something that is chosen.

    3) Someone else made a comment that basically suggests that blacks get over slavery. This, I believe, is just plain misguided. Coke spends 10s of millions of dollars advertising in a single 20 second slot during the super bowl. They, and countless other firms do so because they realize that that 20 seconds has the potential to effect the viewership of the most highly watched television program in such a way that they’ll go buy their products, thus re-earning their investments. If a 20 second commercial can drive the great unthinking masses to buy a soda, what is it that makes you think that over 400 years of slavery and institutional discrimination plays so small a role in the black psyche that it should be ignored or “gotten over?”

    Thanks again for your interest in the article. With your continued support, I’ll be allowed to post more material at BC. Take care y’all.

    Seke Ballard

  • http://mirroronamerica.blogspot.com/ rikyrah

    Barack doesn’t have to worry about the Field Negroes…they are NOT the ones who are stabbing him in the back.

    To be blunt, they are very up front and honest about their skepticism about his candidacy. You know where you stand with Field Negroes. At least the ones around the web, he does.

    And, even with their skepticism, in the end, if they don’t vote for Kusinich, I have a feeling, they’ll vote for him for the Black Nationalist reason or not vote at all.

    The folks that this guy is talking about are the HOUSE NEGROES.

    Without hesitation, THESE are the folks selling out Obama, and most of them are doing it behind his back. Smiling in his face, but all the while working to undermine him behind his back.

    The Patio Negroes can go either way, though. Some support him openly, some are against him openly. Some are just waiting to make up their minds.

    But, the author is critical of the wrong group. The Field Negroes are the most open about their feelings about Obama. He KNOWS where he stands with them. And, I’ll go a step further; they are very honest on what he has to do in order to win them over. Now, whether or not he does it, is his decision, but there is no mystery for him with this group.

    When the knives go into his back, be assured, not one of them will have a Field Negro’s fingerprints on it.

  • Maurice®

    Seke you haved written a great article. I have long dreamed of the day I would be represented by an intelligent and articulate black man in the oval office. I had high hopes Colin Powell would be that man. Unfortunately Obama has different political ideas than me.

    It is interesting how many references have been made about racism. I will admit that even though Obama and I are out of phase (180 degress!) I still want to vote for him because he looks like me.

    BTW after having listened to our present president butcher the language for so long it is a treat to listen to Barack.

  • Maurice®

    Seke in comment #37

    Very good analogy in point #3!