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Ethics in Politics?…How Absurd!

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Part I
By D L Ennis

Ethics–1) Motivation based on ideas of right and wrong –2) The philosophical study of moral values and rules

With all the talk about ethics in politics lately, I had to put this article together.

“America should always be mindful of the ravages of poverty, for if we are not among its victims, its reality fades from us.”
–Dorothy Day, Founder of the Catholic Worker Movement

There is an ever widening economic disparity between the rich and poor. The poor fell to a much lower echelon during the Reagan presidency, and during the Clinton presidency, the rich went forth resplendently well. The top 1% of households accumulated roughly 17% of the nation’s income in 1998. And, in 2003, Bush gave us a tax cut which the richest 5% of taxpayers received most of the economic gain. As Jack Newfield said so well, “This is a class-warfare policy of shooting the wounded and looting the amputees.”

This mounting absorption of wealth has given the exceedingly wealthy dominion over politics by means of exuberant campaign contributions, and mass media possession, whose commentary makes them sound like constituents. Few politicians whom have nationwide followers are disconcerted about the ever-increasing gap betwixt rich and poor and the attrition of democracy by means of vast wealth. American politics can be summed up by Gary Hart’s quoted statement in a February 2 New York Times Magazine profile: “How do you make the principles of equality and justice and fairness work in a time when everyone’s well off?”

Ever increasing apartment or home rent, a minimum wage that has been moribund at $5.15 an hour since 1997, and the rising costs for health insurance are amongst the causes of hunger among the working poor in the United States. The greater majority of poor people work. However the roughly $10,700 a year that $5.15-an-hour minimum-wage jobs pay is in no-way adequate to keep a family together. More than 90% of Americans trapped in low-wage jobs are adults, more than 75% work full-time. They are not substance abusers, alcoholics or the mentally ill; they are average, hard working Americans trying to make it in a world where our country’s elite work to keep them down.

It is extremely difficult for people in low-wage jobs to break away from the cycle of poverty. Most obey the law and pay their bills, some try to improve upon their education, and they rarely ever able improve their job status and living conditions.

Jim Hightower said it in such an eloquent way, “If our so-called national leadership had not lost its shame gene, surely it would be red-faced over its failure to do some little something about the plummeting value of the minimum wage. Today’s miserly minimum of $5.15 an hour delivers a sub-subsistence income of $10,700 a year, if you get full-time work. That’s gross, in two meanings of the word. Millions of Americans–most of them adults and supporting families–are working either for this wage or are paid just a few coins more and have their poverty pay pegged to this wage floor.

In a report from Families USA (which analyzes Census Bureau data) estimates that as a result of welfare reform, 675,000 low-income people, mostly children, do not have medical coverage. In an article by the late Paul Wellstone he stated that, “NETWORK, a national Catholic social justice lobby, collected data on people who visited Catholic social service facilities in ten states with large numbers of people eligible for aid and found an increase of 27 percent in the number of unemployed who do not receive welfare assistance.” He continued, “It also appears that many people who find employment are working at jobs that pay below, often far below, the poverty line. I fear that welfare reform is creating a new class of people, the “Disappeared Americans,” many of whom are children.”

Paul Wellstone went on to say, “Because of these disturbing reports, I recently proposed a welfare tracking amendment that would require the Secretary of Health and Human Services to report annually to Congress on the employment, wage, health insurance and childcare status of former Temporary Assistance for Needy Families recipients. The amendment was voted down 50 to 49 in the Senate, but I will keep submitting it until the Senate does the right thing.” (Paul Wellstone is sorely missed by those of us that care for people as he did!) He said, “The logic in its favor is straightforward. Congress has a serious responsibility to evaluate the new policies it creates and to conduct oversight to discern whether its goals are being achieved. When you try something new, you need to find out whether it works. Why should welfare reform be any different? It is time to find out what is happening around the country to families that lose public assistance, especially in a period of prosperity, when we have seen an increase of 400,000 children in deep poverty.”

The Swedish sociologist, Gunnar Myrdal, once said, “Ignorance is never random.” Paul Wellstone said, “Sometimes we choose not to know what we do not want to know. In the case of welfare reform, we must have the courage to find out.”

I have no heart for somebody who starves his folks. –George W. Bush discussing North Korean leader Kim Jong Il and US food donations on CNN (January 2, 2003)

In her article “Hungry in America,” Trudy Lieberman reported that, “At the end of 2002 the US Conference of Mayors reported a 19 percent increase in the demand for emergency food over the previous year. Food pantries, shelters, soup kitchens and other emergency food providers now serve at least 23 million people a year. “They are America’s dirty little secret,” says Larry Brown, who directs Brandeis University’s Center on Hunger and Poverty. “They are hardworking have-nots who cannot pay the rent, medical bills, and still feed their families.”

In his article “How the Other Half Lives,” Jack Newfield ended with this statement, “The message of history is that only a participatory democracy can challenge a predatory plutocracy.”

Credits

America’s Disappeared, by Paul Wellstone.

Campaign for a Living Wage, by Jim Hightower.

How the Other Half Still Lives, by Jack Newfield.

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About DL

  • http://www.elitistpig.com Dave Nalle

    Someone’s not keeping up with their reading here on BC:

    >>Ever increasing apartment or home rent, < <

    Rents are down nationwide over the last 5 years.

    >>a minimum wage that has been moribund at $5.15 an hour since 1997,< <

    A false statistic since virtually no one actually makes minimum wage. The real market-set minimum wage is over $7/hour.

    >> and the rising costs for health insurance are amongst the causes of hunger among the working poor in the United States. < <

    The working poor don't actually pay for health insurance. If they are in the income ranges you mention elsewhere in your article they qualify for medicaid.

    You also reference the 'living wage' movement, which wants to move the minimum wage to over $10. Would your working poor be better off as non-working poor? That's what such a pay hike would result in. In addition, it's quite possible to live on a minimum wage income if you make sensible sacrifices which the working poor have made in prior eras. The criteria used to set the 'living wage' are completely unreasonable. For a full explanation see this articke

    Dave

  • Maurice
  • D L

    Dave, I apologize if some of my info is out dated. I’ll admit that I collected my sources some time ago and never used it at the time.

    However, living on $5.15 an hour is not possible if you care for living indoors. I don’t know where you live but where I live, most who make minimum wage live outdoors, in shelters or several families to a household; rent is too much if you like eating too.

    In a sense the working poor do pay a sort of health insurance, they pay with their health itself. If they have any health problems they pay with worry over how they will pay for what Medicaid doesn’t pay.

    You must be healthy and wealthy, Dave.
    It’s easy to kick others when they are down…isn’t it?

    DL

  • D L

    Hi Maurice,

    “BTW the rich becoming more rich is not a bad thing for the poor. The poor become wealthier also just not at the same rate as the rich.”

    I agree that becoming richer is not a bad thing. It’s how they are becoming “more rich” and the reasons for doing so.
    Read “CAPITALISM’S BOIL By William F. Buckley Jr. http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=128&e=1&u=/ucwb/20050419/cm_ucwb/capitalismsboil

    Also what are they going to do with all of their wealth? As they say, “you can’t take it with you” and if you leave it to your kids, look at what they are likely to become, in today’s society…the Hilton sisters. Just what we need more of.

    Use it for good I say. Use it to help your fellow man!

    Thanks Maurice!

    Dl

    O Dave, we all have our opinions, it’s just that yours are wrong!

    You are like the man who knows all there is to know about war, but has never been there.

    Take care.

    DL

  • http://www.elitistpig.com Dave Nalle

    >>However, living on $5.15 an hour is not possible if you care for living indoors. I don’t know where you live but where I live, most who make minimum wage live outdoors, in shelters or several families to a household; rent is too much if you like eating too.< <

    Not only is this not true, but it's based on the false premise that people are actually paid minimum wage. Take a look at the BLS statistics. Almost no one is actually paid minimum wage and those who are are almost always in entry level jobs with rapid advancement, or are kids working part time.

    And what's wrong with people sharing living space? Housing is most peoples single largest expense. Throughout history people have expected to live in families or extended families to cut housing costs. Why is that no longer acceptable for the poor?

    The entire premise that some of the wealthy getting richer is bad for the poor is also based on a faulty premise. You assume that wealth is a zero-sum game, when the reality is that the wealth the wealthy accumulate represents growth in the economy and not money taken away from the poor. Bill Gates isn't getting richer by going into the ghetto and mugging old ladies. They get wealthier because they create more wealth, and in fact that also creates more jobs and more opportunity for advancement for the poor.

    >>You must be healthy and wealthy, Dave.
    It’s easy to kick others when they are down…isn’t it? <<

    Hey, go screw yourself you sanctimonious fool.

    Dave

  • D L

    Dave, you don’t have to get nasty. Grow-up!

  • http://www.elitistpig.com Dave Nalle

    I got nasty? You accused me of kicking the poor when they are down. Maybe you should spend a little more time reading what you write and thinking about it. Since you can’t get basic math right, and don’t seem to have much of a grip on any facts – like maybe some citations for your claims – you’re walking on pretty thin ice throwing insults around.

    Dave

  • http://www.markiscranky.org Mark Saleski

    i bet ya can live on the minimum wage in connecticut as they have no sales or income tax.

  • http://www.elitistpig.com Dave Nalle

    If only ’twere true, Mark. But you know, the poor pay no sales or income tax. They’re below the cutoff for income tax and the EIC is supposed to offset or more than offset sales taxes they may pay.

    Dave

  • D L

    OK, Dave. I think enough insults have been tossed around. Peace my friend!

  • http://adamantsun.blogspot.com Steve S

    But you know, the poor pay no sales or income tax.

    I don’t know if it’s nationwide or just in this state, but the foods that are not taxed (milk, produce, meat, basically anything that is not ready-to-eat), NOBODY pays tax on, rich or poor. But everything else, clothing, housing, transportation, etc. the poor pay the same tax as the rich, just with less money to do so.

  • http://www.elitistpig.com Dave Nalle

    Yes, Steve, but not only can the poor claim their state taxes as a deduction on their federal income taxes, but they also can file for the Earned Income Credit which is essentially a reverse tax which gives them money to compensate them for some basic expenses. In fact, a working poor family of four – $35-$40K gross income – could actually end up not only paying nothing, but actually making several thousand dollars profit on their taxes if they take advantage of the opportunities built into the tax system to benefit the poor.

    Dave

  • Richard

    Wow!
    Dave: “don’t seem to have much of a grip on any facts… – you’re walking on pretty thin ice throwing insults around”.

    Is that the pot calling the kettle black?

  • http://www.elitistpig.com Dave Nalle

    Richard, my articles are generally replete with links to factual sources as you ought to know if you’ve read any of them.

    Dave

  • http://adamantsun.blogspot.com Steve S

    In fact, a working poor family of four – $35-$40K gross income – could actually end up not only paying nothing

    and who tells the poor how to fill out all these tax forms? H&R Block?

  • http://www.markiscranky.org Mark Saleski

    something like the eic can provide some help, but not on a daily basic.

    those living at or below the poverty line are generally living hand-to-mouth.

    i’ve been there & it ain’t pretty.

  • http://www.templestark.com Temple Stark

    Still off-topic of course but citing national BLS average stastics or any national statistics is a faulty practice that enables ignoing those who fall below the average.

    Despite contant people saying that peole DO make th eminiumum wage, there is still the obstinant belief that because “no one in my area” (as if that could really be accurately assessed witohut a cite or five) earns the minimum wage, then no one in the country does.

    Falsehood. Not worthy of even shallow consideration.

  • http://www.elitistpig.com Dave Nalle

    Unless someone points me to a comprehensive nationwide wage study, all I can find to go on is the research I’ve done locally and the BLS figures. The BLS figures, btw, are broken down specifically by state and by occupation, so they give a great deal of detailed information. They’re not just some sort of vague nationwide aggregate. When I wrote on the minimum wage on my blog – but I don’t think I ever posted it over here on BC – I called businesses in the Austin area to confirm what the BLS stats reported. I suppose I could mount my own survey on a nationwide basis, but no one is actually paying me for the time and other expenses associated with that.

    I will point out that Austin is one of the areas which the ‘Living Wage’ folks have targeted for their lobbying and publicity efforts – yet it’s virtually impossible to find a job in Austin paying less than $7.25 an hour. They may have chosen Austin for its inherent liberalness rather than for its actual need for wage reform, of course.

    Look, I’m not saying that there aren’t poor people and that we shouldn’t take appropriate measures to help them out. But I do believe – with some evidence to support the belief – that things are not as bad as the doomsayers on the left make them out to be. The poor in the US are better off than the average citizens of most countries in the world, and they are not being left behind as the economy grows as some would have us believe.

    Dave

  • Maurice

    Hi DL

    I read your link and I think that is a topic well worth discussing. How much money is too much?

    For example, if we continue at our current rate of growth there will come a day when we will have Trillionaires instead of Billionaires. The rest of us will be better off as well. The poor will be brought along with us. All boats rise…

    How wealthy is wealthy enough?

    BTW I don’t know how you ever curb the overpaid CEO problem. Is there a way to not over pay sports/movie stars?

  • http://adamantsun.blogspot.com Steve S

    The poor in the US are better off than the average citizens of most countries in the world, and they are not being left behind as the economy grows as some would have us believe.

    I agree with the first part of that sentence but not the second.

    The best way to combat poverty IMHO, is to offer more counseling. Whatever is appropriate, whether it is credit counseling, drug counseling, counseling on self-esteem, or even free education/the teaching of new skills. Draining money from these social programs would be leaving the poor behind, in my opinion. Someone who defines helping the poor in different ways, might not agree with that. And I guess it would be subjective rather than right/wrong.

  • http://w6daily.winn.com/ Phillip Winn

    Try this: The healthy poor in the US are better off than the average citizens of many countries in the world.

    I think that statement is supported by evidence from many sources, while the omission of the word “healthy” makes it either false or debatable.

  • D L

    Very well said, Steve S.

    DL

  • Richard

    Dave, You mention your articles, I didn’t.

  • http://www.elitistpig.com Dave Nalle

    Steve – your idea of how the help the poor is a good one. Just throwing money at them certainly isn’t the answer. Quick fixes rarely are. What holds the poor back is their family backgrounds, the neighborhoods they live in and lack of education. Many of these problems could be solved by things like the inner-city school voucher program they’re trying out here in Texas. It lets those kids escape from their environment and their poor schools at least for half the day and gets them access to enormously better education. That’s why inner city leaders have supported it.

    As for the issue of healthcare for the poor, as we’ve discussed before, we do have public healthcare for the truly poor, it’s the marginal working poor who need help the most. I’ve already written at length on this, but what I still don’t understand is why, if our current system addresses the needs of the well off adquately, we only ever talk about universal healthcare, rather than merely supplementing our private system with some sort of augmentary health care program for those who can’t or won’t pay their own way.

    Dave

  • http://www.taospost.com MDE

    re:”The best way to combat poverty … is to offer more counseling.”

    While counseling is a way to deal with individual poor people, and, as such, is actual ‘hand to hand combat’ with poverty, it will not reduce the level of poverty overall which is more of a systems problem. Some of that promised investment capital would work a lot better.

    re:”that things are not as bad as the doomsayers on the left make them out to be. The poor in the US are better off than the average citizens of most countries in the world, and they are not being left behind as the economy grows as some would have us believe.”

    Living in a world economy where a few hundred thousand are murdered through imposed starvation and slaughter here and there, now and then, and where slums unimaginable to us in the US are commonplace, this seems a parochial attitude. Lots of the world’s resources end up here. Is it surprizing that there is dross for the poor?

    Mark

  • http://www.elitistpig.com Dave Nalle

    So, MCH, are you suggesting that we should impoverish the US and give all the money to the poor of the rest of the world? Will our poor be happier when they’re 90% of the population instead of a small fraction?

    Dave

  • http://www.taospost.com MDE

    re:”are you suggesting that”, etc

    I made no suggestion.

    Mark

  • http://adamantsun.blogspot.com Steve S

    it’s ironic that as soon as I posted my last comment, a friend came over all distraught because she’s facing homelessness today. Ticks me off because she’s all crying around my daughter, talking about her husband saying ‘I’m not going to be his bitch”, etc. He left her today (again). She’s unemployed, he’s an alien who won’t establish roots, etc.

    She’s on unemployment, their house is as big as our bathroom, etc. but she’s not lazy, like people constantly portray the poor as. But in order to better her situation, I try to give her counseling, but I’m not qualified. This type of mentality that she has, has always been prevalent in the poor that I have seen. There is a way out of her situation, and technically she is the only one that can make it, I am for the social programs that would give her direction and show her the way, rather than just give her a welfare check everyweek because I can see that running out and she’s not doing anything to prepare for it. She’ll just patch things up with him, then 2 weeks later be back over here crying again…..

  • http://adamantsun.blogspot.com Steve S

    She’s 56 years old. I did get her to enroll in community classes that teach Office/Word/Excel, and she comes over to practice on an old computer. She knows I’m right about things, and so that (school) is the one thing she’s clinging onto, it’s her way out of her situation, I’ve convinced her of that. We even gave her all her school supplies. But if/when she drops out because her homelife has gotten too turbulent, it’s not because she’s lazy, it’s because she needs help (counseling) and she needs to learn how to deal with things. She just left a bit ago and now she’s all prepared to stay in school but sleep in her car if she has too.

    It’s mentality, it’s counseling that’s needed. It’s not laziness or abuse that is the primary cause of America’s poor. That’s what I believe, I’ve known a lot of poor/homeless people.

  • http://www.taospost.com MDE

    So, we can agree that international comparisons need not enter the discussion? Our poverty is pretty striking on its own merits.

    The question is, are the trends implied in the article for real or bogus.

    Mark

  • http://adamantsun.blogspot.com Steve S

    Any comparisons between the poor here and the poor overseas, I would bring up the comparison of resources AFTER acknowledging that they are correct.

    Poor people over here do have it better than poor people overseas. To not admit that shows your debate opponent that you are not receptive to debate and compromise, for you do not acknowledge a truth. And the unhealthy poor over here have it better than the unhealthy middle class in many parts of the world.

    THEN, you turn to resources. How much of the US budget goes to helping the poor instead of weapons or corporate subsidies vs. how much of the Soviet Union’s budget is even capable of going to corporate subsidies, etc.

    You can acknowledge your opponent is correct and still win the argument. If we redirect misused funds (negotiable as to what those would be) then we can provide the resources to solve poverty in this country and still have plenty left over to lower everybody’s taxes.

  • http://adamantsun.blogspot.com Steve S

    oops, my cut and paste didn’t work right.

    “vs. how much of the Soviet Union’s budget is even capable of going to helping the poor instead of weapons or corporate subsidies”

  • http://www.elitistpig.com Dave Nalle

    Stop being so sensible, Steve – it’s annoying. Ever considered running for office?

    On your earlier point about the woman facing homelessness. It sounds like what she needs is not just counseling, but also ‘life skills’ training. This is something which a lot of states have started offering to the chronic poor – teaching them things like how to do a job interview, how to balance a checkbook, how to make a budget, how to fill out their taxes, how to file for various grants and aid, how to deal with conflict and problem domestic situations. There’s a legacy of poor choices and lack of education in how to cope with the world that gets passed down from generation to generation within the historically poor portion of the population. In a sense they become their own worst enemies, neutralizing whatever progress they make with poor decisions which they’re hardly even conscious of.

    Of course the big difficulty is getting people to actually accept this kind of help and acknowledge that they need it. These sorts of programs are usually forced on the subject involuntarily as an alternative to prison time or other punishment. Perhaps any welfare reform or expanded national health program should include as part of its mandate, requiring recipients to take advantage of these kinds of services to get whatever the state is giving out.

    They say ‘an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure’ and I think that investing in counseling and lifeskills education would ultimately end up saving the state welfare programs a hell lof a lot of money.

    Dave

  • http://adamantsun.blogspot.com Steve S

    Dave, I agree with everything you say there 100%. She needs a lot of financial discipline, and credit card companies are giving her low balance cards with high interest rates all the time (well, before she hit unemployment). Her problem is of her own making, but there are shady capitalists out there who know people in her situation and abuse it.

    I do support these social programs that are designed to break behavior that is carried from generation to generation, the problem is that the fundies say that is ‘The State’ telling us how to live. And not only do they not want to pay for welfare, but they don’t want to pay for the counseling either.

    There is a middle ground here where everybody can be happy, you and I are on the verge of it, why can’t politicians see it?

    And I know that not every poor person will choose the help/counseling. But that doesn’t mean we don’t make the doors available for those who do choose it, we still need to have these programs better funded and better managed.

  • http://www.diablog.us Dave Nalle

    >>I do support these social programs that are designed to break behavior that is carried from generation to generation, the problem is that the fundies say that is ‘The State’ telling us how to live.< <

    I'm more against the state telling us how to live than the fundies are, but this isn't the same thing. This is the state telling people who don't have the first clue how to live how to learn to take care of themselves. Giving people the skills to cope and become self-sufficient ought to appeal to libertarians and conservatives and everyone else. It's a hell of a lot better than paying for disposing of the wreckage these peoples lives turn into.

    >> And not only do they not want to pay for welfare, but they don’t want to pay for the counseling either.< <

    I would think we could sell this on the basis of prevention being cheaper than dealing with the mess afterwards, but then legislators can't even grasp a no brainer like legalizing marijuana, so what use are they, really?

    >>There is a middle ground here where everybody can be happy, you and I are on the verge of it, why can’t politicians see it?< <

    Laziness? Republicans might be philosophically inclined to look for this sort of solution, but they're totally distracted by other issues. Democrats are interested in the poor, but their only answer is to pay them off to make sure they get their votes - they don't really give a damn about making their lives better.

    >>And I know that not every poor person will choose the help/counseling.< <

    That's why I suggested semi-coercive measures - like take some counselling and education to earn your unemployment check or your WIC. That approach could sell with Republicans. Where did Tommy Thompson go, anyway?

    >> But that doesn’t mean we don’t make the doors available for those who do choose it, we still need to have these programs better funded and better managed.<<

    Attendance is the key to that. If you make it compulsory in some way then you get the numbers showing up, then the funding is justifiable and the program gets to live. Politicians need to see hard numbers and quantifiable results.

    Dave

  • http://adamantsun.blogspot.com Steve S

    In a sense they become their own worst enemies, neutralizing whatever progress they make with poor decisions which they’re hardly even conscious of.

    Not all of the poor, but all of the poor that I have known, yes that’s true.

    For example, she has no money until the next check comes in, days away. Then she gets an application in the mail that says ‘sign here’ and there will be money in her bank account in 24 hours.

    Long term it hurts her and holds her back, credit wise because you know it’s just a matter of months or so before her payments get behind and the late/penalty fees start racking up. Short term, well the stomach is rumbling. What do we expect her to do? What is the ‘good’ decision there? Sometimes their choice is only ‘bad’ and ‘worse’. In those cases, it comes down to perspective and frame of mind. Accepting your decision and quit coming over to my house being a drama queen.

    Heehee, sorry.

  • mindy

    well my family is VERY poor my ma lost her job becuase the people she was working for put their grandma in a old peoples home without telling my ma and my ma’s boyfriend does make $ 20 hr but he has to pay like 400 a wk to his exwives for child support and to his work like $50 for his uniforms and he owes his 401k money and he owes other ppl money cuz and one point we had to ask for money from his 401k and other people. MY family is very poor. food banks dont give the most important things you need to make food , MILK, BUTTER, EGGS and cheese and here in oklahoma eggs are like 1.50 milks is almost 5.00 and butter is rising too not alot but enough. my life has never been easy i see moderatly finacially okay people being given free cars and homes and money but my family has never been helped like that. it seems like noone really cares about us “POOR” people cuz when your buying namebrand foods and eating steak im sitting at home and eating a knock-off brand hotdog on almost bad bread. you guys talk about poverty as in you personally know it but in reality you dont. i have to worry about being able to finish high school and then finding the money and time (in between having a minium wage job) to EVEN GO to college. believe me i WANT to help americas society but i dont know if i can because my family doesnt have the money. like for instance my mom cant even afford the gas to drive to the mission to get free food because the gas costs to much too waste. we are having to like pay our bills over 6 months cuz we cant afford to pay the gas last month. yes our rent is cheap to others ($400) but to us thats a fortune because thats almost all the money my ma (working part time cuz of my 3 yr old brother) and her boyfriend (working full-time) makes every month im still lucky i have a home but thats only cuz my ma’s boyfriend cashed in his vacations. but after this month he doesnt have anymore. i know ya’ll probaly dont wanna know about MY problems but i just wanted to let you guys know that minium wage and even 15-20 $ an hr cant excatly cover everything because of ppl owing other ppl money that they borrowed to get out of a tight spot and even child support and back child support kills the money ppl receive its all deals with the person. but truth to be told im actually in a better place now than i was as a little kid growing up because i grew up living in a run down half-a-house shack in the middle of nowhere with no heat,water, and electricity except by a extension cord and we went to our family who basically disowned us and they let us take a shower every now and then or we just snuck in and took one when they were gone and ate their food. so i hope you guys get that not everyones life is as well-off,good, or positive as yours and you kinda like understand what the heck im talking about…well hope you guys liked the poverty point of view from a 15 yr old.
    sincerly,
    ~mindy~