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DVD Review: Repo Man – The Criterion Collection

Some movies don’t age well. You see them 20, 30 years after they were made, and they feel dated. The plot doesn’t work, the characters aren’t relevant, and because whomever was making the film was so conscious of being hip and cool, everything sounds and looks out of date. In fact, that’s what usually happens when the mainstream tries to capture the underground or outsider subculture on camera. They make something based on trends and fashion and don’t bother to go beneath the surface. However, when a movie is made where those involved understand what’s happening in the world they are attempting to recreate on the screen and do their best to bring that to life, you end up with something enduring. It’s not a good ’80s film or a good punk film, its just a good movie.

A great example of a movie made during the early part of the 1980s that was part of a particular sub-culture and has stood the test of time is Repo Man. Just re-released in a brand new remastered edition as part of The Criterion Collection in a two disc special edition DVD set, the movie sparks with a life and creative anarchy you don’t often see in a mainstream movie. It’s a reminder of how there was a time when the words independent film meant small budget and experimental, not Hollywood patting themselves on the back at Sundance.

Directed by Alex Cox Repo Man is set in Los Angles of the early 1980s. Not the glamourous L.A., nor even the fake seediness of Sunset Strip, but the down and out of the dispossessed and directionless. The story follows a young punk, Otto (Emilio Estevez), as he stumbles through life failing at work and romance. A chance meeting with Bud (Harry Dean Stanton) draws him into the world of repossession men. Bud takes Otto under his wing and teaches him the basics on how to survive in a job where they basically steal people’s cars. If you miss more than three car payments chances are you’ll wake up one morning to find your car has been repossessed by these erstwhile agents of finance companies.

Into this world comes a mysterious Chevy Malibu. With a reward of $20,000 going to whomever manages to repossess the car it quickly becomes the focus of everyone’s attention. Both the guys who work with Bud and a couple of mysterious dudes named the Rodriguez Brothers are after it for the reward. There’s also a bunch of really obvious government agents, led by a female agent with a metal hand, who are going to stop at nothing in order to get their hands on it. When Otto meets a young UFO enthusiast, who is somehow mixed up with the car, she tells him it is carrying the remains of four aliens a scientist has snuck out of a secret American base. However, it quickly becomes apparent what’s in the car’s trunk is a little more lethal than dead alien corpses.

In a normal movie, the car and its contents would quickly take over as the central focus. Either it would become some sort of race to save L.A. from whatever is in the car or about a couple of brave people trying to prevent the government from covering up some big secret or other. What we have is the Chevy Malibu careening its way haphazardly in and out of the action and only staying on our lead’s radar because of the money its worth. For Bud, it represents his ticket to independence and becoming his own boss. For Otto, well, we’re never quite sure if it means anything to him. He likes the rush of stealing cars legally and doesn’t seem to be thinking beyond that.

The movie depicts an America where all that matters is you make your payment on time. Credit is the glue holding society together, Bud intones with great seriousness to his pupil Otto. To him its a sure sign of how badly America has stumbled when people run out on the money they owe. Driving past a street filled with down and outs, drunks and the homeless, he wonders aloud how much money they owe, and accuses them of running away from their responsibilities. “Most of them don’t even use their Social Security numbers,” he says to Otto. Of course he’s ignoring the fact these people have fallen so far through the cracks it’s doubtful they’re ever going to be worrying about their credit rating ever again.

About Richard Marcus

Richard Marcus is the author of two books commissioned by Ulysses Press, "What Will Happen In Eragon IV?" (2009) and "The Unofficial Heroes Of Olympus Companion". Aside from Blogcritics his work has appeared around the world in publications like the German edition of Rolling Stone Magazine and the multilingual web site Qantara.de. He has been writing for Blogcritics.org since 2005 and has published around 1900 articles at the site.