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DVD Review: Murphy’s Law, Series 3

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Your life is a lie. Each day you wake up is another day you continue to live that lie, and if somehow you slip up and make a mistake you’ll die. For weeks, months even, you pretend to be someone else and are constantly in danger of being found out and killed. Even worse are the things you have to do in order to preserve that lie. You have to watch with approval as people do things that all your instincts cry out for you to interrupt. Sometimes it’s not enough to just sit back and watch, you have to join in, and tear another hole in your soul.

When does the lie cease to be a lie and become reality? Does there come a point when you cross the line and become who you’re pretending to be? How do you hold on to the vestiges of yourself when everything you do is in direct opposition to what your conscience tells you is right? Do you ever find, to paraphrase Frederick Nietzsche, that by staring into the eyes of the dragon too long you start to become the dragon? It’s hard to imagine there are people who would willingly put themselves into the type of position described above. However, as is brilliantly depicted in the Tiger Aspect production Murphy’s Law, Series 3, now available on DVD from Acorn Media, that just about perfectly describes the life of an undercover police officer.

Detective Sergeant (DS) Tommy Murphy, James Nesbitt, is an undercover officer for the National Crime Squad working in London England. Those who have seen previous episodes of the show will know he’s pretended to be everything from a bent cop to a homeless alcoholic in the course of his operations. While he’s had to deal with difficult situations in the past, the six episodes making up Series 3 take him down roads that are darker and more twisted than any he’s walked before. Unlike previous years where each episode has been a stand alone story, on this occasion the operation he’s involved in is spread out over the course of the season’s six one hour shows. As a result we watch everything he has to endure in order to get a result.

What starts off as a simple attempt to catch people willing to buy illegal firearms, Murphy is posing as a supplier and armament expert, gradually turns into a far more elaborate sting operation. When the person who shows up for the initial meeting, one Caz Miller (Michael Fassbender) tells him the gun will be used for a murder, Murphy refuses to sell him a gun but offers his services as a contract killer. He hopes that by doing this he’ll not only be able to prevent a murder from taking place, but also bring down Miller and whomever is responsible for ordering the hit as well. It’s this spur of the moment decision that begins his long and dangerous journey of the soul.

It turns out Millar’s boss is somebody the police have been trying to catch for a long time but have never been able to accumulate sufficient proof to nab him. Dave Callard (Mark Womack) is a known cop killer (A frustrated senior officer says “Two hundred witnesses just happened to be in the loo” in explaining how Callard was able to get away with beating the cop to death in the street), and drug dealer who has been gradually giving himself the gloss of legitimacy through front operations. When the connection between Millar and Callard becomes clear, those higher up in the force decide this might be the chance to bring him down and direct Murphy to start infiltrating his organization in order to accumulate evidence against him.

About Richard Marcus

Richard Marcus is the author of two books commissioned by Ulysses Press, "What Will Happen In Eragon IV?" (2009) and "The Unofficial Heroes Of Olympus Companion". Aside from Blogcritics his work has appeared around the world in publications like the German edition of Rolling Stone Magazine and the multilingual web site Qantara.de. He has been writing for Blogcritics.org since 2005 and has published around 1900 articles at the site.