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DVD Review: Batman: Under the Red Hood

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Batman: Under the Red Hood is the story of the second Robin – only after he was killed by the Joker and brought back to life by Ras al-Ghul. Judd Winick wrote the script, based on the Batman arc he wrote that revived Jason Todd, and it serves pretty well, but I know it couldn’t do true justice to the whole story. There’s a lot of history in this tale, and all of it worth telling.

As far as this direct-to-DVD effort goes, the story can’t relate all the years Jason was around after Batman caught him stealing the tires off the Batmobile (something that fans simply couldn’t imagine being done even back in the early 1980s). He lasted for five years before getting killed, and was dead for seventeen years before he was brought back to life.

All the fans believed Jason was dead. After all, didn’t DC Comics run a phone contest for fans to decide his fate? (Right after that, Warner Brothers – the parent company – got hold of DC and asked what they were going to do with the warehouses full of Batman AND Robin products they had to sell!) So a third Robin was immediately in the offing.

Comic heroes are notorious for not staying dead. Used to be we could point at Captain America’s sidekick Bucky Barnes and say, “See? Bucky’s dead.” Only now Bucky is the new Captain America and Steve Rogers is dead – except that he’s now back alive too.

Simply put, there’s a lot of emotional context and resonance and real-time history missing from the pared-down story on this disc. However, it is slam-bag full of all things Batman. First of all, there’s lots and lots of action. And there’s a ton of Bat-toys. Then there’s the appearance of Nightwing, Ras al-Ghul, AND the Joker.

There’s a lot going on in this movie. The beginning of the film is gripping, and the assault on Jason Todd/Robin is brutal. Watching it with my twelve year old was a little hard because I didn’t expect that level of intensity. The Joker was played as perverse and evil, and he stayed that way through the film. I love how he turned the tables on Blackmask.

The art is rendered beautifully. Loved the explosive action, the detail, and the cityscape. The world depicted here really felt like Gotham in all its glory and grime.

I found the ending a little disappointing, though. Plenty of questions were raised, and everybody got a look at the heroes’ moral compasses, but the main question concerning Batman’s relationship with Jason Todd wasn’t satisfactorily answered. Batman makes a choice at the end, but where does he stand after he makes it?

I know part of this story is still ongoing in the DC Universe, so the movie is an excellent lure to pull readers into the six-part Red Hood story now being published. But in these direct-to-DVD adventures, I’d really appreciate a whole story. This one ends almost where it starts, and we still don’t know the true outcome.

This Blu-ray disc comes with lots of extras, including two episodes of the original Batman The Animated Series. These episodes recount the origin of Dick Grayson/Robin, so they’re a special treat. There’s also a lot of material (interviews and comic content) depicting Jason Todd’s history, and there’s sneak peek of the next DC Comics direct-to-DVD movie, Superman and Batman: Apocalypse. The best part, though, is the Jonah Hex short feature written by Joe R. Lansdale.

 

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