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Do Negative Campaigns Work In Music As Well?

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So here’s Madonna, messing with file sharers by flooding the sharing services like Kazaa with spoof files of songs from her new American Life CD that are blank other than a terse message from Herself: “What the fuck do you think you’re doing?”

Then, playing right into her evil little hands, remixers sampled her scatalogical inquiry into things like this.

Her Svengali-like orchestration of the masses seems to be paying off (note pic):

    Madonna, whose American Life (Warner Bros.) is on track to sell over 200k for the week, with a shot at reaching 250k, according to early reports from national accounts.

    That’ll be good for #1 on next week’s chart, which is right up there with baseball, apple pie and Chevrolet, if you ask us, dagnabbit. [Hits Daily Double]

Of course it’s difficult to tell at this point whether the spoof campaign is behind the record’s apparent success, or if people just like it, but imagine the havoc this will wreak on the sharing services if it turns out spoofing increases sales.

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About Eric Olsen

Career media professional and serial entrepreneur Eric Olsen flung himself into the paranormal world in 2012, creating the America's Most Haunted brand and co-authoring the award-winning America's Most Haunted book, published by Berkley/Penguin in Sept, 2014. Olsen is co-host of the nationally syndicated broadcast and Internet radio talk show After Hours AM; his entertaining and informative America's Most Haunted website and social media outlets are must-reads: Twitter@amhaunted, Facebook.com/amhaunted, Pinterest America's Most Haunted. Olsen is also guitarist/singer for popular and wildly eclectic Cleveland cover band The Props.