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Comic Review: Green Arrow #31 by J. T. Krul and Federico Dallocchio

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Green Arrow is apparently destined to take another great fall. I don’t know if I’m looking forward to it, but there are some interesting portents that have been shown in the Blackest Night and Brightest Day arcs. Sandwiched in between, the Rise and Fall of the Justice League offers some dramatic turning points in the lives of several characters. Evidently fans are in for another shakeup in the DC universe.

Arsenal (Green Arrow’s first sidekick known as Speedy, and later as Red Arrow) has lost an arm in his mini-series. Naturally, Oliver Queen isn’t the kind of guy to take that lying down. During the Cry For Justice series he showed his true colors. In his own words, Green Arrow isn’t a hero first; he’s a hunter.

He proved that when he killed Prometheus. Some fans were probably shocked by that outcome, but longtime readers remember the Mike Grell days when Ollie circular-filed the trick arrows and started using full-fledged hunting arrows. He also drew blood — a lot of it.


In issue #31, Ollie canvases the ruins of Star City and sees all the pandemonium in the streets. Another thing that DC Comics seems to be big on these days is city destruction. Granted, I know that if superheroes, and supervillains, existed, wholesale property damage would be extensive. I really liked the way San Diego became Sub Diego in the Aquaman strip for a while, but the eradication of Coast City seemed a bit much.

And now Star City has this massive star-shaped burn in the center of it. You’ll have to check out Brightest Day #0 to see how that area becomes even more interesting, and how it’s going to fit into the new emerging Green Arrow mythos. Starwood Forest anyone?

This issue stretches credibility to a degree. I get that Green Arrow is totally thrown for a loop and is angry for the loss of the city he was supposed to protect. But I really have a problem when he can go up against Green Lantern, Flash, and Black Canary and just walk away. I’m all for equality among heroes, but they each have their venues. Believing that Green Arrow could get the best of Green Lantern and the Flash — at the same time! — just mistreats my willing suspension of disbelief. He’s already gone off the grid with his behavior. They’d be expecting something. He wouldn’t be able to catch them so flat-footed. I think it would have been better if he’d dodged them altogether. However, then we wouldn’t have had the neat emotional send-up of values.

Federico Dallocchio’s art is good. He does cityscapes and sunsets really well, and the action sequences capture a lot of intense movement in snapshots. The perspective shifts in the panels are eye-catching as well, as is his choice of close-ups and wide-angled shots.

I think writer J. T. Krul intends to take Green Arrow down the outlaw path for a while, and I’m not adverse to doing that, especially with the revamped forest inside Star City, but Mike Grell already did this. Gonna have to show me something new, although my love of the character will be enough to keep me for now.

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