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Cinco de Mayo and Bonza Bottler Day

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Yesterday was May 5, pronounced “cinco de Mayo” en Espanol. Cinco de Mayo is a holiday commemorated by Mexicans and Americans (particularly in Arizona, California, New Mexico and Texas), and a day the French (and perhaps the British) would like to forget. May 5 is also a Super Bonza Bottler Day.

“Cinco History,” at the Website Viva Cinco de Mayo, explains today’s historical significance:

The 5th of May is not Mexican Independence Day, but it should be! And Cinco de Mayo is not an American holiday, but it should be.

So, why Cinco de Mayo? And why should Americans savor this day as well? Because 4,000 Mexican soldiers smashed the French and traitor Mexican army of 8,000 at Puebla, Mexico, 100 miles east of Mexico City on the morning of May 5, 1862.

As Cinco History further explains, American forces supported the Mexican military to win the:

great victory that kept Napoleon III from supplying the confederate rebels for another year, allowing the United States to build the greatest army the world had ever seen. This grand army smashed the Confederates at Gettysburg just 14 months after the battle of Puebla, essentially ending the Civil War.

Ongoing collaboration between Mexicans and Americans was evidenced when:

In gratitude, thousands of Mexicans crossed the border after Pearl Harbor to join the U.S. Armed Forces. [And] As recently as the Persian Gulf War, Mexicans flooded American consulates with phone calls, trying to join up and fight another war for America.

Another valuable resource is the DVD, Celebrating Cinco De Mayo, which describes how the occasion is celebrated and the principles it represents:

Parades, traditional foods, colorful crafts, and happy people are the trademarks of celebrating Cinco de Mayo. Cinco de Mayo presents a wonderful opportunity each year for two neighboring countries — the United States and Mexico — to acknowledge and re-affirm their friendship. The holiday glorifies freedom and liberty, ideas that are cherished by citizens of both North American democracies.

Cinco de Mayo, like other holidays, is subject to crass commercialization. Googling “Cinco de Mayo” gives you the chance to find historical background, recipes, events, and ways to celebrate. It also reveals as many advertisements and infomercials from purveyors of goods and services as it does cultural and historic resources. For an example, visit Viva Cinco de Mayo. I was once a major culprit of that sort of enterprise. In the early 1990s, I worked with the team that introduced Taco Bell products to grocery stores. Taco Bell Corporation (now a division of Yum! Brands, Inc. but then a PepsiCo division) collaborated with its corporate partners to roll out the grocery product line coincidentally with Cinco de Mayo. That timing strategically leveraged the larger buzz surrounding Cinco de Mayo and the appreciation it fostered in the United States for many things Mexican. (Incidentally, Americans view Taco Bell food as Mexican or Tex-Mex; Mexicans view it as American.)

The commercialization of Cinco de Mayo is notable in what is known as “Super Bonza Bottler Day.” Bonza Bottler Days occur whenever a day and month coincide, such as July 7, August 8, and September 9. Super Bonza Bottler Days fall on popularly recognized holidays or when a day, month, and year coincide (e.g., January 1, 2001, February 2, 2002 and Cinco de Mayo last year: May 5, 2005). Thanks to the numerous holidays and observances throughout the world and proliferation of special-interest observances (such as Doing Business in Your Bathrobe Day sponsored by Webmomz to recognize “the hard work and dedication it takes to be an entrepreneur” and to promote the Webmomz organization), Super Bonza Bottler Days occur almost monthly. Examples of Super Bonza Bottler Days that fall on American holidays include January 1 (New Year’s Day), February 2 (Groundhog Day), April 4 (International Day for Landmine Awareness and Assistance), May 5 (Cinco de Mayo), June 6 (Teachers Day and National Yo-Yo Day) and November 11 (Veteran’s Day).

Bonza Bottler Days were created by some brilliant promoter to provide monthly excuses to celebrate and to generate marketing campaigns. Although it is unclear who originated the occasion, its terms are readily traceable. “Bonza” and its synonym “bonzer,” are popularly used in Australia, and likely derive from the word “bonanza.” Bonza and bonzer are defined in the Urban [slang] Dictionary as “brilliant,” “well executed,” “excellent,” “great.” In The Free [online] Dictionary , it is defined as “remarkable or wonderful, extraordinary.” The word “bottler” likely derives from the Australian term “bottle shop” or its diminutive forms “bottlo” (pronounced bottle oh) or “bottl-o.” Defined as an Australian word, Wikipedia says it is “a shop selling alcoholic drinks (for external consumption),” i.e., for consumption off the premises. For marketers, event promoters, and purveyors of food and drink, Bonza Bottler Days are, well, bonzer!

Bonza Bottler Days can be used for good as well as greed. Marketers and non-marketers alike could use these monthly opportunities to pamper significant others, make and assess progress toward fulfilling resolutions, and do good deeds.

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About Lisa Tolliver

  • Bliffle

    “As Cinco History further explains, American forces supported the Mexican military to win the:

    great victory that kept Napoleon III from supplying the confederate rebels for another year, allowing the United States to build the greatest army the world had ever seen. This grand army smashed the Confederates at Gettysburg just 14 months after the battle of Puebla, essentially ending the Civil War.”

    Yet another reason to wish that Lincoln had let the Confederacy go it’s own way. The CSA would have been a convenient buffer between the USA and a moribund Mexico. Much as USA now buffers Canada from most of such vicissitudes.

  • http://victorplenty.blogspot.com Victor Plenty

    Yeah, just think of the profit potential if modern corporations could outsource to the Confederate States and have access to genuine, legally recognized slave labor!

    Brilliant observation, Bliffle!

  • Bliffle

    As luck would have it, I drove through our East Side today and was thrilled to see so many cars driving with large flags displayed everywhere. I can’t tell you how my heart leaped when i saw the Good Ol’ red white and green…wait a minute….there’s no green in Old Glory! There’s blue, and a field of stars and little red and white stripes! What is this? Italy? Red white and GREEN?!

  • http://www.GoDebGo.com Debbie Knebel

    Date: Tue, 30 May 2006 09:36:41 EDT
    Subject: Bonza Bottler Day Originator & Thanks

    Dear Ms. Tolliver –

    I read your Cinco de Mayo – Super Bonza Bottler Day article and was thrilled. Years ago a friend started this monthly holiday. I first read about it in our local newspaper and also read in the same article a disturbing point. My friend and the originator of the holiday, Elaine Freemont, was killed in a traffic accident. I, and the world, gained a great monthly holiday and at the same time I learned of it, I found I had lost a friend.

    Following is the link to an article that describes acurately Elaine’s idea of the celebration. Upon searching further, another article states that Elaine had this registered in Washington. (?) Elaine was a super person that enjoyed life without the desire or need of alcohol, etc. She had the Lord and His spirit and joy in her life and I look forward to the days I’ll see her again. expressionsofsoul.com

    I felt compelled to write you to clear up the authorship, and also to thank you for mentioning it. After first reading in our paper about the holiday, I never forgot the concept – however, I did forget the strange name and I have you to thank for bringing that to light – THANK YOU!

    Happy Bonza Bottler Days!

    Debbie Knebel