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Book Review: Write Yourself Free: Conscious Living and Personal Peace Through the Power of the Pen by Maureen Daigle-Weaver

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Write Yourself Free: Conscious Living and Personal Peace Through the Power of the Pen teaches you to pay attention to your thoughts, and find peace using a journaling process to solve problems. It forms a good basis for beginning journal writers, and is a great way to get unstuck whether your problem is insomnia, a bad boss, or a relationship.

Based on the methods of self-discovery used by others, including Louise Hay and Esther and Jerry Hicks, the author teaches you to articulate paths to growth and change when you realize something in your life is not working.

Learn how journal writing can help neutralize toxic feelings and use Daigle-Weaver’s system to identify and choose the life you want. You’ll learn why the “Law of Attraction” often backfires since we get what we focus on, whether positive or negative. The author relates how, once she figured this out, she realized she was setting herself up to be a “living, breathing crap magnet.”

Write Yourself Free has a seven-step process to clearer thinking with journaling, which helps you move beyond doubt and self-criticism to understanding and healing.

You’ll learn the power of journaling when you realize negative thoughts pouring out on the page don’t help, but that telling the truth and writing about those feelings gets you to understand the source of your problems.

Gaining control of your conscious thoughts, and using the seven steps in Write Yourself Free to reach a desired outcome will also ease the exhausting and unhealthy stress that contributes to illness.

The case studies, while useful, are somewhat fragmented, since they are discussed throughout the seven steps. It might be helpful to select one case study you can relate to, and read through that person’s problem-solving process on its own, after you’ve read the entire book.

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About Helen Gallagher