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Book Review: William S. Burroughs vs. The Qur’an by Michael Muhammad Knight

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I had a really strange experience while reading William S Burroughs vs. The Qur’an, the latest book by Michael Muhammad Knight, published by the Counterpoint Press imprint Soft Skull Press. I was almost finished with the book and all of a sudden came across my own words staring back at me from the page. It was surreal to find myself being quoted in somebody else’s work to begin with, but even weirder to see how the words dovetailed with Knight’s theme.

The quote was from my review of his book Journey To The End Of Islam and I had said something along the lines of how if more people were as brave and honest as Knight was in discussing their religion the world would be better off. He freaked out. “The brave and honest porkshit is artistic and spiritual sabotage. When someone puts that psychic poison on you how can you ever write a word?” That might sound like he’s being ungrateful, even petulant, but in the context of the book it actually makes perfect sense and I get where he’s coming from. For while his books have been all about telling people all about his quest to find himself within his religion, people have started looking to him as if he’s the answer to that question for themselves.

In William S Burroughs Vs The Qur’an Knight details how his search for his place in Islam inevitably led him to an earlier generation of white Western converts to Islam. In particular he tells of his attempt at writing the definitive biography of his Anarcho-Sufi hero and mentor Peter Lamborn Wilson, also known as Hakim Bey. The first part of the book is taken up with his recounting his times spent with Wilson and excerpts from the biography he’s destined never to finish. We learn that Wilson’s Islam has its sources in both the experiences of Burroughs and other Beats (Paul Bowles, Alan Ginsberg and the rest) in Tangiers during the years of the International Zone and the Moorish Science Temple of America founded by Noble Drew Ali of Chicago.

While I can understand Knight’s attraction to the idea of an Islamic lineage with white American roots, the more he begins to detail Wilson’s life and experiences the more I began to wonder whether he was clutching at straws looking to this guy as any sort of spiritual guide. From his experiences with LSD guru Timothy Leary to his wanderings through India he seemed more intent on discovering his capacity for ingesting drugs than any sort of spiritual advancement. It isn’t until he ends up in Iran in the 1970s that he even settles to any sort of apparently serious spiritual advancement. Even that is tainted by the fact that the group he joins, The Imperial Iranian Academy of Philosophy, is described by Knight as “a politically ambitious mystico-fascist cult” whose purpose seems to be give the then Shah of Iran the veneer of spirituality.

However, while his association The Academy raises some doubts in Knight’s mind, it’s not where or who Wilson studied with that’s important. It’s how he studied and his experiments with various sects and forms of Islam that Knight identifies with. Then there is the whole issue of lineage. In Islam a spiritual teacher’s credibility is increased by those he sites from previous generations as being the sources for his wisdom. Wilson traces his lineage back to Medieval times and the leader of the alleged drug crazed sect notorious in the West known as the Assassins, Hassa-i Sabbah, via William S Burroughs. The sect was famous for their doctrine of Qiyamat which cancelled all religious laws that, according to Wilson, was a call for all Muslims to realize the “Imam of his own being”.

About Richard Marcus

Richard Marcus is the author of two books commissioned by Ulysses Press, "What Will Happen In Eragon IV?" (2009) and "The Unofficial Heroes Of Olympus Companion". Aside from Blogcritics his work has appeared around the world in publications like the German edition of Rolling Stone Magazine and the multilingual web site Qantara.de. He has been writing for Blogcritics.org since 2005 and has published around 1900 articles at the site.
  • http://www.paulbowles.org/photoslit3.html John Arles

    It should be noted that in no way should Paul Bowles be considered a Beat writer, and it is incorrect to claim he was. Bowles’ writings are not similar to Beat writings; thus he should not be placed in the same category as Burroughs, Ginsberg, Corso, etc. Bowles lived in Tangier for 52 years, whereas the Beat writer William S. Burroughs only lived in Tangier for 4 years, and Allen Ginsberg and Gregory Corso, among others, merely visited for relatively short periods of time.