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Book Review: The Owner’s Guide To the Teenage Brain by Derek Pugh

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For many parents and teachers, the teenage brain is a bit of a mystery. How does this soft, squishy stuff in a teen’s skull help a teen think? Derek Pugh helps the reader dispel the mystery of the brain and develop a brain that can learn and be fit.

In The Owner’s Guide to the Teenage Brain, Pugh shows parents, teachers, and adolescents how to best take care of their brain. The pre-teen years can be so confusing. Pugh demystifies the brain for the for teens.

My favourite section of the book is how parents and teens can take steps to prepare the brain for learning by getting enough sleep, exercise, drinking enough water, eating breakfast, and eating right. This is great news for teens who may have a difficult time learning difficult material at school. Many times the teen does not have a learning disorder but merely has difficulty focusing, which could be caused by not eating or sleeping right. Most times, parents can help teens learn better and focus more simply by taking a few basic steps. 

The Owner’s Guide To the Teenage Brain is written for teens and also will be of interest to parents and teachers. There is a part at the end of each section of the book for the parent and the teacher. I loved Pugh’s book and recommend that teachers and parents who have teens read it. It is clear, humorous, and very instructive. The illustrations also do a great job in bringing home the points Pugh is making. What a gem of a book about a very fascinating topic.

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    Teens need to focus on concentration. That means no cell phones, video games and other things that detract from learning. Too many teens multi-task while they are trying to learn new material. This is a mistake. Multi-tasking is only appropriate when the involved tasks have been mastered and not when a teen is in a learning mode with seeing the material for the first time.

    “My favorite section of the book is how parents and teens can take steps to prepare the brain for learning by getting enough sleep, exercise, drinking enough water, eating breakfast, and eating right. This is great news for teens who may have a difficult time learning difficult material at school.”