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Book Review: Stranger to History by Aatish Taseer

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Most of us have little or no difficulty in understanding our heritage and what it means to us in terms of our belief systems as we usually have the example of either our parents or the community around us to go by. However, what if one of your parents comes from a culture that's not part of the majority and that person has never been part of your life? It may take a while, but sooner or later you're going to start to notice you're different from everyone around you, and eventually you might start to become a mite curious as to what you've inherited from your absent parent.

Aatish Taseer was born in Delhi, India as the result of an affair between his Sikh mother and his Pakistani Muslim father. While his mother never kept from him the truth about his heritage he grew up surrounded by cousins his own age wearing the turbans emblematic of their faith, making his uncovered head feel very conspicuous and out of place. It's not until he's 21 that he finally makes the journey across the border to visit his father for the first time. While he is welcomed by his father's wife and children with open arms, the man himself is far more reticent. Salmaan Taseer is an important political figure in Muslim Pakistan, and the knowledge he has an Indian son who may or may not be Muslim could create difficulties.

"However, as Taseer describes it in his new book from McClelland and Stewart, which is partially owned by Random House Canada, Stranger To History, even if his father is reluctant to recognize him in public, at least by the end of his first visit he begins to feel they have developed the basis for a relationship."

Like many other Pakistanis, Salmaan is a secular Muslim, so the fact that his son is a Muslim in name only shouldn't make any difference to him. (In Islam the father's religion dictates that of the children.)

However when Taseer, now a journalist in England, writes an article about second generation Pakistani immigrants becoming fundamentalists and extremists because of estrangement and failure of identity, his father takes him to task in a letter for not understanding what it is to be a Muslim and for spreading anti-Muslim propaganda. Taseer is confused; how can the man who once said "the Koran has nothing in it for me" be offended as a Muslim by what I had written? It's obvious his father is right when he says that Taseer has no understanding of the Muslim or Pakistani ethos as he can't understand his father's apparently contradictory attitude. What does his father mean when he calls himself a "cultural Muslim"?

Attempting to find an answer to this question, Taseer sets off on a personal pilgrimage through the Islamic world. Starting in the fiercely secular Turkey, where many Islamic religious practices are forbidden by law, he makes his way slowly to Pakistan via Syria, Saudi Arabia – where he travels to Mecca – and finally the nominally Islamic state of Iran. Through conversations with various people, and his observations of life in each country, it becomes clear that there is no set answer. In Turkey he meets young men who dream about a world where everyone is ruled by Islam because it is the only faith which can tell you how to live properly. In Syria he sees how that dream is being actualized by a regime with its own political agenda and not above cynically manipulating people.

By offering people a version of the world free of all contradictions and questions, a world in which there is only one "truth," they can control them with the help of a compliant clergy. In Abu Nour, a centre for international students in Damascus, people come from all over the world to learn Arabic and take classes in Islamic studies. However sermons in the mosque include distorted views of history designed to depict Muslims as being persecuted throughout the ages and work up antagonism against an enemy simply referred to as the West. The result is the creation of a world that exists in isolation designed to equate being Islamic as a supporter of the Syrian government and any who oppose Syria are enemies of Islam.

When the book shifts to Iran the depiction Taseer offers is no different than any other description you've read of people living under any totalitarian regime. Here he finds that Islam is being used to harass people over trivialities, like the length of their shirt sleeves, in order for an insecure government to exert control over them. In fact in what is supposedly an Islamic republic where you'd expect to be able to find answers as to what is a Muslim, there is even less chance of discovering that here than anywhere else. For, as a university professor he meets puts it, "People were very connected to religion even though the government was not religious. But now the government is religious most people want to get away from religion… It is very hard for me to say I am a Muslim."

Taseer is by profession a journalist, and while that comes through in his ability to ask the right questions of people, his writing style is far more personal than you'd expect from a reporter. He makes no pretense about this being an objective study of Islam; rather it's a personal voyage undertaken in the hopes of bridging the gap between himself and the father he was estranged from for over 20 years, and that comes across in his writing. His yearning to understand both his father and the religion he professes to practice, and the frustration and confusion they generate in him, predominate throughout the book as he intersperses accounts of his travels with recollections of his attempts to find common ground with his father.

In many ways this is one of the bravest books you'll ever read, as Taseer doesn't hesitate to voice opinions that are going to be unpopular with people at all ends of the political spectrum. His compassion for the people he meets allows him to see beyond their words to the need that gives them birth, giving the reader a deeper understanding of where their opinions were born. The title of the book, Stranger To History, refers obviously to Taseer's ignorance of his father and his Muslim and Pakistani inheritance. However, it can also relate to what he has witnessed in his journeys in Syria and Iran where history is being rewritten to generate hatred against the West in order to solidify the current regime's power bases. While he doesn't offer any solutions or comfort that there is some easy way to change or prevent what is happening, hope can be taken from his time spent in, of all places, Iran in the people's determination to deny the regime in any small way they can.

Although his attempt to reconcile his own history with his father is somewhat of a failure, Taseer consoles himself with the fact that he has been able to connect with his personal history of being a product of both parts of the Indian subcontinent. By having both countries he has had the chance of "embracing the three tier history of India whole, perhaps an intellectual troika of Sanskrit, Urdu, and English. These mismatches were the lot of people with garbled histories, but I preferred them to violent purities. The world is richer for its hybrids." While he may not have come any closer to discovering his father, or his father's religion, he has discovered himself.

Unlike those who think what the world needs is surety and purity, Taseer reminds us that sometimes there are questions which don't have answers and history isn't always divided up into winners and losers. If for no other reason, that makes this an important book to read, as it not only shows you the dangers of a world where black and white dominates, but it makes you realize just how wonderful a little confusion and uncertainty can be. Well, you may not come away from reading this book any more enlightened about Islam then you were before you started, but you'll have a better understanding of the variety of people who fall under the umbrella of that word. After reading this book you might not be so quick to make generalizations based on a person's religion and have a better understanding of what lies behind many of today's headlines.

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About Richard Marcus

Richard Marcus is the author of two books commissioned by Ulysses Press, "What Will Happen In Eragon IV?" (2009) and "The Unofficial Heroes Of Olympus Companion". Aside from Blogcritics his work has appeared around the world in publications like the German edition of Rolling Stone Magazine and the multilingual web site Qantara.de. He has been writing for Blogcritics.org since 2005 and has published around 1900 articles at the site.
  • http://corp-minamiji.typepad.com Christy Corp-Minamiji

    And yet another book to add to my “I want” list. Nice review.

  • John Lake

    In the past and even today in many parts of the world, religion is the fundamental issue. This is true, in fact, in many parts of the United States. In remote areas, atrocities are being committed in the name of religion. The Muslim religion seems to answer many questions, and to give guidance to people, but young people today are beginning to think, perhaps rightfully so, that any religion is in fact flawed; any irrational belief is counter- productive to rational pragmatism. Every society must give its members reason beyond law to behave in a socially acceptable manner. Given only the law, many would see no reason not to follow their personal greed, or lasciviousness, to the destruction of that society. So, we have an impasse. If we are being constantly watched by an all-powerful figure, capable of reward, or punishment, we will comply, and yes, the world will be better for it.
    But this dream of a better world has been tinged and tainted. Many with little else to live for try to expand these religious ideas to fill the hours and years of their lives. Personal drives become a factor and, over generations, the zealots begin to see this supreme judge actually wanting them to do things destructive to all society. Superior people, who have devoted more time to their study of religion, feel they must force their beliefs on others.
    In any case, I have seriously digressed. My purpose here is and was to address the changes taking place in Pakistan. A religious person assumes that the changes are hinged on belief and idealism. A more pragmatic person may suspect an economic motivation. If I were to undertake to criticize the Pakistanis, I would look for an economic issue. I would involve the American Secretary of State, and her overwhelming belief that money will solve all the problems of the world. She gives away millions of dollars of more, and bitterly accuses those accepting her money of wanting still more. It wouldn’t be surprising if that very money were at the core of the current upheavals.
    I don’t have enough insight into the world of Pakistan to create an intelligible article. Perhaps you do. If someone could outline some of the crucial issues, it would be a meaningful step in their resolution.
    I might apologize for my long-windedness. I am hopeful that someone can give a clear, rational explanation or interpretation of the ongoing developments in Pakistan.