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Book Review: Snafu: A Tale of Presidential Election and a Girl

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Snafu: A Tale of Presidential Election and a Girl by Simon Plaster is a brilliant combination of satiric writing and comedic relief. In this fictional spoof on election year gaffes, Simon Plaster creates a story filled with non-stop political blunders. His writing is acerbic, mischievous, and irreverent, poking fun at: Obamacare, “Slick Willie,” the Tea Party, Global Warming, Presidential debates, and Vice Presidential Candidates. He also includes the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy; the “Leave the Child Behind Act”; campaign fundraising; the frenzy created by the news media; and many other related issues.

During the year of the presidential election, the 9th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals adopts the slogan “Everybody Counts” as a rule of constitutional law. Oklahoma’s state legislature is deadlocked on how to respond to these parallel tracts, the electoral vote and the newly enacted Everybody Counts popular vote.

As the result of a chance occurrence, the Democratic presidential incumbent names Virgil Carter as his Vice Presidential running mate. This action directs national attention to the Okmulgee County Commissioner Election. The bizarre results of this “Snafu” become a roller coaster ride of rollicking satire, parody, and political mockery.

Plaster introduces a zany cast of whacky caricature-like characters. These characters, the dialog and the plot are consistent with his quirky writing style. I especially enjoyed the thought processes of individual characters, expressed through asides and inner conversations with their alter egos.

Snafu: A Tale of Presidential Election and a Girl by Simon Plaster is a timely book for every American politician, voter, and student of political science. I highly recommend it for those citizens who take themselves too seriously.

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About Richard R. Blake