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Book Review: Parents Are Being Played Like A Video Game by Gregory Chester

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If Gregory Chester's Parents are Being Played like a Video Game proves anything, it's that the hysteria over violent media has a reached a point where people will believe anything that’s connected to it. Chester is such a person, and somehow managed to get a book published on the subject. To say this is one of the worst books ever sent to Blogcritics for review would not be a statement that far off base.

Focus is only one of countless problems in Chester's book. The book claims to be a parenting assistant to counter that of the famous Dr. Spock. Chester's credentials, which include going through three divorces, being a marketing expert, and earning a degree in electrical engineering, hardly make him seem like an expert.

Chester jumps all over the place, discussing random topics in chapters that rarely follow their title. In fact, only a few pages actually discuss Dr. Spock in any length, and there's zero evidence to back up any of the claims made here. His research can barely be called that, veering off course into wild accusations (the "overly liberal Supreme Court" is a result of Dr. Spock's books according to him), hilariously off-base generalizations, and uninformed opinions.

For a book that struggles to make it to the 130-page mark (and for 20 pages he literally cuts and pastes various internet articles in their entirety), Chester makes a staggering number of grammatical errors too. Beyond the extreme overuse of italics, bold fonts, underlining, and exclamation points, there are spots where words have no spaces between them at all. Incomplete sentences and run-ons are frequent as well. He capitalizes some words and few pages later, doesn't capitalize them at all. It's a book in desperate need of a decent editor.

The only real advice Chester provides himself that aren't copied from someone else is to pay attention to your children, or as he puts it over 30 times, "be aware." That's it. He offers little else of value, and the entire concept of being aware should be common sense for anyone with a child.

This still doesn't even cover the absurd claims he makes. What follows is a brief selection of direct quotes that are either so far off-base they're entertaining for comic relief, or depressing since these have actually been published:

"I also know… divorce can have its stress causing subtleties and be just as harmful as violent video games."

"While smoking has nothing to do with video games, even though a lot of gamers do smoke…"

"There have been no definitive studies and still no definitive answer about its (violent video game playing) effect on our children until now!"

The last sentence never actually states what study has supposedly proven a link, nor is there even a mention of one anywhere in this paperback's pages. Those three sentences are incomprehensible enough, but when Chester begins linking crimes to video games, things spiral downhill even faster.

At one point, the author sincerely believes carrying an assault rifle in your car is a side effect of playing video games. As he debunks a crime spree, he claims the actions of the criminal are all side-effects of a violent video game. Yet in his infinite wisdom, he states the article used for reference never makes a single statement about ANY video game or if the suspect even played them.

More anti-gaming rants continue as he claims college grades have dropped due to the pastime of video games. He makes a wild claim that smoking marijuana can increase the effects of violent games "4 to 6 times," links various school shootings to the medium, and claims drag racing titles are the most popular amongst kids.

Why are those statements not only wrong, but also uniformed?

He has no evidence to support his college grades theory, freely admits the school shootings he mentioned were never linked to video games, and there are around three total drag racing games on the current market, none of which cracked a sales chart.

His ignorance on the topic is proven as he recommends pcgamer.com instead of the official video game ratings board (the ESRB) website to check game ratings. He claims the AO rating was added after a re-rating of Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas which is entirely untrue. The rating of AO has been around as long as the current rating system. He claims Bloody Roar III is a "very violent video game" even though it's clearly rated a T for ages 13 and up.

Other oddities include a brief section on road rage, which is completely out of place in a book on parenting. He pushes a religious agenda in the final chapter (which seems like his true motive), and in one case, it seems that his entire view on society came about because of one incident.

As he explains it, Chester's roommate asked if his older daughter could stay with them. She brought some, "less than respectful" (to be kind) people along with her. As the pot-smoking, violent video game-playing, and flat-out rude gang member teens wreak havoc on his apartment, every single one of Chester's claims about gamers is brought up. This is the only logical explanation for his raving.

By the time the book is over, it's far more depressing to think people like Chester can offer parenting advice, and a few people might actually take it to heart. This is simply an awful, convoluted, and barely even comprehensible poke at what he believes are society’s ills. There's hardly a shred of evidence to be found, and once you know you should "be aware," you already know the only logical advice Parents are Being Played like a Video Game serves up.

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About Matt Paprocki

Matt Paprocki has critiqued home media and video games for 13 years and is the reviews editor for Pulp365.com. His current passion project is the technically minded DoBlu.com. You can read Matt's body of work via his personal WordPress blog, and follow him on Twitter @Matt_Paprocki.
  • http://www.dorksandlosers.com Tan The Man

    Very nice and thorough review.

  • http://www.breakingwindows.com Matt Paprocki

    “Woah, if it’s so bad, how did it get published, asks a naive me.”

    From what I read on their site, Authorhouse is a self-publishing outfit. Apparently, they print and promote, and that’s it.

  • http://www.breakingwindows.com Matt Paprocki

    Of course not all self publishing ends up like this, but I almost have to wonder why the guy just didn’t start a website instead. That’s how most of the book reads anyway.

  • Gregory L. Chester

    Dear Matt:

    A Roast is not a fair Review!

    I intentionally sent you a PR , knowing that you’d give a critical, but I hoped fair, review of my book. I didn’t realize that your web site header says, it would be “a sinister plot.” I only wish that you had informed me that I had been bloodied (like in some of the violent video games), so I could have responded earlier and not had to wait till after I sent you a Thank You note for requesting a review copy of my book.

    In your review, you said, “Focus is only one of the countless problems in the book.” However, my focus was to acknowledge the present lack of character & respect today, based on what I believe to be the cause, the saying: “Spare the rod, Spoil the child,” and yet you discussed many of my violent video game examples throughout the book, so I would say that I “Stayed the course!”

    You say, I lack credentials to be an Expert, but in the first paragraph of Chapter 9, I mention that I’m not an Expert, but that I headed-up a group of five (5) Child Psychologists, who where. My consulting company was hired to develop a Character Education Class for a major city school system. But you mentioned my divorces, which were only a twist of fate that more & more people are experiencing, as a determent. And if you had read on, you would have noticed that I said “… that it’s not the number of divorces that affects the kids, it still comes down to parenting and how you handle the situation!” I’m also surprised that you would remark that there’s “zero evidence to back up my claims,” the book is full of evidence of the lack of character & respect, in the many referenced articles, by authorities on the subject.

    It’s also surprising, that you would take time to count the 30 times that I used the word “aware,” after all, it is an awareness book, as I stated in bold on page 103. A book to hopefully alert new parents, before their children’s Character solidifies.

    As for my “absurd claims,” I’m sure you would agree that the “stress causing subtleties of divorce” has caused many children to blame themselves for the divorce. As for the “subtleties of violent video games being harmful,” I guess you missed my reference to #AP15, an 6/9/06 article entitled, Detox clinic helps video game addicts by Fia Curley of The Associated Press. And my comment about smoking was a lead-in to the fact that smoking causes death or would you disagree with that too?

    When you mentioned, my “anti-gaming rants,” it’s plain to see that I’m not against all video games, it’s only violent video games that I think we can do without! As for not linking them to school shootings, you must have forgotten about the most famous shooting spree of all, that happened at Columbine High School, that was definitely proven to be linked to a violent video game called “Doom.” Some kids have even been brought to light and arrested before they could celebrate the anniversary of Columbine, by doing the same thing! When the young Drag Racer got killed, I only mentioned that “Drag Racing video games have been the most popular among kids,” not that they “cracked a sales chart.”

    As for proving my “ignorance on the topic,” you should re-read page 94, where I referred parents to http://www.esrb.org for video game rating symbols & http://www.pcgamer.com as a place to go for video game descriptions. Now who’s ignorant?

    Your comment about: “Other oddities include a brief section on road rage, which is completely out of place in a book on parenting.” proves that you and your review are the ones out of place! A lack of patience & self-control are some of the main causes of Road Rage, which could have possibly been corrected early-on by the proper parenting!

    As for one incident causing my “entire view on society,” it was only a light in the darkness, the straw that broke the camel’s back, as it were. It did however, make me realize that I may not be the only one affected by Family Terrorism (Chapter 7) and that a book may help other families.

    Thank you for reviewing my book and bringing it to your public’s eye! I only wish that you hadn’t presented it in such a sinister way. But, I think I have corrected that! Thank you again!

  • http://www.breakingwindows.com Matt Paprocki

    Gregory:

    “I didn’t realize that your web site header says, it would be “a sinister plot.”

    Our site doesn’t say that. It says a sinister cabal.

    “yet you discussed many of my violent video game examples throughout the book, so I would say that I “Stayed the course!”

    Subject stays on course. Your chapters do not, and constantly go off on tangents.

    “the book is full of evidence of the lack of character & respect, in the many referenced articles, by authorities on the subject.”

    Lack of character and respect is your evidence? Huh? You do quote a few sources, yet use the information incorrectly like the media has so many times.

    “It’s also surprising, that you would take time to count the 30 times that I used the word “aware,” after all, it is an awareness book, as I stated in bold on page 103.”

    Then you probably don’t need to stuff the word down the readers throat. Your advice to parents is ALWAYS to be aware. How many times do you need to say that?

    “I guess you missed my reference to #AP15, an 6/9/06 article entitled, Detox clinic helps video game addicts by Fia Curley of The Associated Press.”

    So beacause a clinic opens up for video game addicition, that immediately makes them harmful? That’s logical? People can be addicted to anything thay enjoy. That doesn’t mean it’s instantaneusly a problem. Isn’t it possible that the clinic opened to help parents of children who read books like yours?

    “it’s only violent video games that I think we can do without!”

    And violent books, violent movies, violent comic books, violent music… It’s here. Games are no more violent than any of the above when compared. Also, each of those had their day in the media. When was the last time you heard of kid reading a comic book and going crazy? In the ’50s, it was going to turn our society upside down. Comics still exist, more violent than ever. To single out one medium is beyond ignorance.

    “As for not linking them to school shootings, you must have forgotten about the most famous shooting spree of all, that happened at Columbine High School, that was definitely proven to be linked to a violent video game called “Doom.”

    Huh… wonder when that link was proven. As far as I knew, their parents sitting down while their kids were building bombs in their garage and their emotional problems veered out of control were a pretty apparent fault.

    And please, can you be the one to play Doom and explain to me HOW it teaches someone to kill? Have you ever even played it, let alone seen it? It’s archaic. Millions upon millions have played Doom, and more are this week since it was released on the 360. Two kids go on a disasterous school shooting, and the game is the reason? Wouldn’t the gun makers be just as much at fault but this same logic?

    I only mentioned that “Drag Racing video games have been the most popular among kids,” not that they “cracked a sales chart.”

    And either way, the statement is incorrect. Care to tell me what drag racing game is the most popular? How about providing a link to a sales chart where a bargain basement drag racing game is anywhere to be found?

    “where I referred parents to http://www.esrb.org for video game rating symbols & http://www.pcgamer.com as a place to go for video game descriptions. Now who’s ignorant?”

    So you tell people to go to PCgamer to find game descriptions. Hmm. What about game descriptions for games coming on the Xbox, PS2, PSP, DS, GameCube, and others? Kind of important, no?

    “A lack of patience & self-control are some of the main causes of Road Rage, which could have possibly been corrected early-on by the proper parenting!”

    And a general anger issue couldn’t be at fault?

    “But, I think I have corrected that!”

    I don’t even want to respond to that. Let me say this. I want hard evidence. Millions of kids have violent video games. They’re grade A students, they grow up to be responsible adults. One or two head off the right path and, of course, authorities find games in their home. They’re less likely NOT to find a violent game. That’s not the cause for their violence. Even without research, plain dumb logic should set in to realize the cause is not a video game. There are deeper issues at work, like gun control, and of course parenting. Your book doesn’t help ANY of this. It’s only adding to the current hysteria and taking advantage of it.

  • Gregory L. Chester

    Matt:

    I’m very surprised that you would spend 14 paragraphs on the Roast/Review and 23 paragraphs on my rebuttal to clarify your misquoted facts. I guess it’s because it’s on a subject that’s dear to your heart, noting your bio at the bottom of your review, that you also work for Digital Press, a classic video game website, “after your fanzine (Gaming Source) published its final issue.” On the other hand, I don’t have an ax to grind!

    As for my statement about your website header: the word “Sinister,” is pretty well understood. However, for “Cabal,” my dictionary says, “An intrigue; persons united in some intrigue. To combine in plotting.” I’m sorry, if the truth hurts!

    As for “Subject stays on course. … You do quote a few sources, yet use the information incorrectly like the media has so many times.” Please note that I am only the Author, you are the media!

    As for, “So beacause (spelled because) a clinic opens up for video game addicition (spelled addiction), that immediately makes them harmful? YES! So far, I don’t think reading books is addictive! But of course, that’s only my opinion.

    “Violent books, movies, comic books, & music.(is that a sentence?) It’s here. Games are no more violent than any of the above when compared.” It’s not the music, it’s the words that are harmful. But, I think you have missed the point altogether! It’s not the media, it’s the interactivity & adrenalin that’s habit forming

    Columbine shooters linked to video game Doom?? Please read the article that I referred to get the date, I didn’t make up that fact! If those “kids were building bombs,” as you say, I didn’t read that. Is that one of your facts?

    “Doom … teaches someone to kill?” I didn’t say that I played it, but since the Army bought the game for that, ask the Army or read the article to get your facts straight. Maybe it reduced their moral resistance! As to your other logic, I think some of the public is after the gun manufacturers, but then, that’s not what my book is about, is it? As you know, Reviewers should stick to what’s in the book!

    As for my comment about “Drag Racing,”in the article I quoted (RJ#4, page 97), it did say “apparently” drag racing, where it said that, “one died and one faces charges.” I didn’t mention which game or which chart in my book, it was immaterial! As for my general comment, I guess I should have just said “racing,” because there’s usually more than two (2) cars involved in the majority of racing video games and only two (2) cars when it’s drag racing. But, in my example, there were only two cars. To this point, I think you’re being a little fastidious!

    As you should know, my book examples dealt with the past, not the future. I assume that since PCgamer is in the game description business, they will deal with the future, when it becomes the present! I don’t claim to see into the future, do you? In your review, you just had your facts backwards and just for the record, I used the word “ignorant,” because you did, otherwise I never use the word!

    Your last paragraph was ALL GENERALIZATIONS! WHERE IS YOUR HARD EVIDENCE? You say, “plain dumb logic,” I agree, but it’s yours! I only used the facts about “violent” video games, from authorities! More facts are coming to the surface, mine is only one of the first books on the subject!

    If you don’t mind, I’m going to try to be an adult about this and stop this childish back and forth debate game with you. I guess any publicity is good publicity. Thanks again for your Roast/Review.

  • http://www.breakingwindows.com Matt Paprocki

    So debating your book is childish? Wow. I believe adults debate things. It’s how things work.

    That’s one defnition of cabal. The other is: a clique, as in artistic, literary, or theatrical circles. We’re not “plotting” against you. We’ve reviewed a few thousand items. Yours is no different.

    “you are the media”

    Absolutely. Just not the part that fails to research and believe everything I hear.

    “YES! So far, I don’t think reading books is addictive! But of course, that’s only my opinion.”

    Of course books can be addicitve. Anything can be. However, no psycologist is going to speak out against them. They’re a respected medium. Games are not because people continually manipulate readers into believing they’re evil. It’s not possible someone got the idea to open a clinic to snag a few bucks from worried parents? A clinic is proof of nothing other than that one exists.

    “It’s not the media, it’s the interactivity & adrenalin that’s habit forming”

    No, they’re entertainment. People watch a lot of TV. People watch a lot of movies. People listen to a lot of music. Anyone can do any of the above excessively if they enjoy it.

    “If those “kids were building bombs,” as you say, I didn’t read that.”

    Here you go: They had 48 carbon dioxide bombs, 27 pipe bombs, and 11 1.5-gallon propane containers.

    judicial-inc.biz

    “I didn’t say that I played it, but since the Army bought the game for that, ask the Army or read the article to get your facts straight.”

    Sigh. The Army used a heavily modified version of Doom. I don’t think spider demons were walking the hallways of Columbine, and I don’t think the army squares off against them in Iraq. Doom not only doesn’t require any aiming, it feature no human death, the graphics are archaic, and to believe anyone could learn to shoot/kill from playing it is absolutely unreal. The Army uses them for tactical reasons.

    The Army also used a modified Battlezone back in the early 1980s. Did that influence people to run around and shoot people in tanks?

    “I didn’t mention which game or which chart in my book, it was immaterial! ”

    I believe you cited Need for Speed Most Wanted.

    “But, in my example, there were only two cars. To this point, I think you’re being a little fastidious!”

    No, I’m pointing out a lack of knowledge on the topic. Shouldn’t this be important information for a concerned parent in a parenting book?

    “As you should know, my book examples dealt with the past, not the future. I assume that since PCgamer is in the game description business, they will deal with the future, when it becomes the present!”

    Um, that still doesn’t help parents get any information on console gaming, past, present, or future.

    “Your last paragraph was ALL GENERALIZATIONS! WHERE IS YOUR HARD EVIDENCE? You say, “plain dumb logic,” I agree, but it’s yours! I only used the facts about “violent” video games, from authorities! More facts are coming to the surface, mine is only one of the first books on the subject!”

    Yours is one of many on the topic. The others at least cite credible sources, use charts, and dig deep into reports on the subject. Here’s a great link for you.

    Want a researched topic? How about Henry Jenkins, MIT Proffesor:

    The most important thing to remember is: correlation does not imply causation.

    And please, there’s no need to stop debating. That’s what this is for. If you think you have a book that makes sense, defend it. The comment section has one purpose. This is it.

  • http://www.breakingwindows.com Ken Edwards

    Ahh, Gmail is a wonderful thing isn’t it. Gregory, I would like you to know that I sent the link to this review to your Promotions Coordinator, Justin Byrns on Aug 15, 2006 2:55 AM (the same day this review was published).

    So why you did not see it before Sept. 28th, I do not know.

    I am not going to go into a lot here, as Matt has done an exemplary job of debating good points, but…

    “As you should know, my book examples dealt with the past, not the future. I assume that since PCgamer is in the game description business, they will deal with the future, when it becomes the present!”

    Why would you write a book that deals with the past? While bringing to light past events is one thing, your work should look at the present. Books are dated and, at times, obsolete once they are published these days as it is.

    Parents should be aware about what is going on now. It is an election year, and as such, there are many bills being written on the hot button topic of video games. It would do them (parents) a service to distill this information in a useful manor – provide both sides. Not just give common sense advice, and charge for it.

    I also do not know where you are getting “roast” from. Matt did not ridicule you. He reviewed your work based upon the many texts already available. When things don’t add up, it is only right to clarify this.

  • Gregory L. Chester

    Dear Matt,

    I just stopped by your Roast of my book again to see if you would take NO for an answer. I wanted to see what type of Gentlemen (?) that I was dealing with. Unfortunately, I discovered that both you and Ken can’t walk away when you’re wrong, as most adults would. But I guess, down deep, I knew it was all about ratings in the first place, my book was only incidental. The more controversy, the more readers. I realize that you dis’ed my book because it’s what you do and not totally because my book brought out the truth on a subject that is dear to your heart or should I say paycheck. A Review is NOT a debate, no matter what you and Ken say! Check your dictionary and see if the word “debate” is anywhere in its definition.

    BTW, I guess I should have told you up-front that I think the Video Game Industry is really taking off and that I usually look for the trends, not hysteria (of which, you are well aware of by now) and put my money where my mouth is. It’s called full disclosure, something you may not be aware of. (Oh, there’s that word again.) But, I’ve had stock in Nvidia Corp. for some time now. I’m sure you know that they make the best graphics chips and that they’re used in most game consoles. And just for the record, when I learned that THQI, a good video game software company, came out with their violent game, “Saint’s Row,” I sold all of their stock I had, the very next day!

    In one of your rebuttals, you asked why I included Road Rage in my book. Well, I included it to show an alarming trend in our younger generation (possibly from a lack of good parenting). Roughly speaking, it’s what a person expresses (in this case, while driving), who always thinks they’re right, doesn’t have patience for anyone else, lacks self-control and wants to prove a point (even if it’s wrong). In addition, they don’t think things through and don’t care what harm they cause (to anyone, including themselves). Oh yes, they won’t let go, they must always have the last word! Does that sound like anyone we know?

    A Review is an approval or critical comment of something that is in the book, NOT what you think should be in the book. Columbine was an event, mentioned in my book because it began with a violent video game. It proved a gruesome point. As for your comments about me not mentioning that “the kids were building bombs,” and the number and type of bombs, or your gory website reference, or the archaic graphics of Doom, their favorite violent video game, those facts are NOT in my book and therefore, should not even appear in your review or it’s discussion!

    I said, “It’s not the media, it’s the interactivity & adrenalin that’s habit forming!” You then say, “No, they’re entertainment,” The following proof you give: is watching TV & movies & listening to music, all of which are NOT interactive! Is that more of your “plain dumb logic?” (to use your own words).

    As for Ken’s question, “Why would you write a book that deals with the past?” Well, the past, usually referred to as History, helps one make decisions in the present. In my book, the past supports what is happening in the present and if not corrected, may escalate in the future!

    “Um, that still doesn’t help parents get any information on console gaming, past, present, or future.” Is that more of your “plain dumb logic,” Matt? Those topics are not in my book for a reason!

    “Yours is one of many on the topic. The others at least cite credible sources, use charts and dig deep into reports on the subject. Here’s a great link for you.” Well Matt, I used your resourceful link. It was a Dec. 2005 article called “Reality Check on Video Game Violence,” by the Managing Editor of Skeptical Inquirer, who has no initials after his name! (So this is your credible source?)

    As for your deep research reference on the topic, Henry Jenkins, MIT Professor (sorry, I left out your extra “f”), “Eight Myths About Video Games Debunked,” I assume it was written in 2003 because it referred to three (3) articles written in 2003, five (5) in 2002, one (1) in 2001, and one (1) in 2000. If you don’t remember, all of my referenced articles were from 2005 and the article referred to as a ‘Must Read’ on page 100, entitled, “Detox clinic helps video game addicts,” was dated 6/9/06. Now, whose sources would you say are more credible, and recent?

    As for your plea to keep debating, I refer you to my definition of Road Rage, herein. As for entertaining your readers, the 3rd time is a charm and this is the 3rd time I’ve proved you two wrong!
    Besides, I’m not getting paid for it! I have Book Signings and a Book Festival to get ready for!

    It’s been a real exercise in futility, Greg

  • http://www.breakingwindows.com Matt Paprocki

    “Unfortunately, I discovered that both you and Ken can’t walk away when you’re wrong, as most adults would.”

    It’s a debate. Generally, debates can continue for quite some time.

    “I knew it was all about ratings in the first place, my book was only incidental.”

    Um, your publisher came to us. We never would have even known about it had it not been for them.

    “I say paycheck”

    We’re not paid. The site barely breaks even on operating costs in a good month.

    “A Review is NOT a debate,”

    Nope, it’s not. Innacuracies are part of a review though.

    “But, I’ve had stock in Nvidia Corp. for some time now. I’m sure you know that they make the best graphics chips and that they’re used in most game consoles. when I learned that THQ, a good video game software company, came out with their violent game, “Saint’s Row,” I sold all of their stock I had, the very next day!”

    So, maybe you should sell the Nvidia stock too. They produce chips that run the violent video games. What’s the difference between that and producing the game? The developer wouldn’t be able to make the title if it wasn’t for the chipset.

    “Road Rage… Does that sound like anyone we know?”

    Um, wouldn’t the same thing be said of you since you also replied?

    “Columbine was an event, mentioned in my book because it began with a violent video game. It proved a gruesome point.”

    It all started with a game? Couldn’t have been the years of bullying? Bad parents who paid no attention to their kids? Hate to tell you this, but bad parenting would have started long before they got their hands on ANY game.

    “As for your comments about me not mentioning that “the kids were building bombs,” those facts are NOT in my book and therefore, should not even appear in your review or it’s discussion!”

    So, if I reviewed, say, a book on insects and there’s nothing in there about ants, that’s not information the potential reader would care about? You skipped FACTS to build your case the way you wanted, to place the blame on a scapegoat, not the root of the problem.

    “is watching TV & movies & listening to music, all of which are NOT interactive!”

    A lot of DVDs have small games on the disc, some for kids, some for adults. Shouldn’t those be included?

    “Is that more of your “plain dumb logic,” Matt? Those topics are not in my book for a reason!”

    So educating parents on the industry you’re bashing isn’t relevant because…? In a parenting book, shouldn’t you provide as much information as possible?

    “I assume it was written in 2003 because it referred to three (3) articles written in 2003, five (5) in 2002, one (1) in 2001, and one (1) in 2000. If you don’t remember, all of my referenced articles were from 2005 and the article referred to as a ‘Must Read’ on page 100, entitled, “Detox clinic helps video game addicts,” was dated 6/9/06. Now, whose sources would you say are more credible, and recent?”

    So an article, NOT RESEARCH, is more relevant because of the date it was published? Has there been some sudden leap in the field that would be missed? If so, by Jenkin’s recent book. He debunks everything in there.

    “I’m not getting paid for it!”

    And neither am I!

    “As for entertaining your readers, the 3rd time is a charm and this is the 3rd time I’ve proved you two wrong!”

    You still haven’t sold a copy off of Amazon.com. I don’t think readers are pounding our servers to see if the book is worth a purchase.

    And yet again, all you did was try to debunk our comments. You completely dodged the Columbine kids parenting issue by saying it’s not in your book, and apparently, that means it’s not important. I can’t imagine how you believe that’s logical.

  • http://www.breakingwindows.com/ Ken Edwards

    Dear to my paycheck? Wow, if I am getting payed for this, then my check is getting lost in the mail. And I would be pissed.

    You missunderstand, we do not get payed being critics. I don’t see a paycheck from Blogcritics or anyone else to write about video games.

    Matt already covered most things in his latest comment, but your publisher sent us an email about your book. To be honest, we would have never read it if that had not happened. Since it was on one of our favorite subjects, of course we wanted to check it out.

    And Gregory, these comments are for debate, which is what we are doing. The review up top is the passive part.

    Saying that Nvidia are the best graphics cards is just an opinion (I like ATI cards in my computers, and that is because I like ATI, my opinion). But ATI is inside of the GameCube, Wii, Xbox 360. That does not equate to “most game consoles.” That is another fact that you got wrong (or skipped over), just like in your book.

    I am (just like Matt) only pointing out the obvious.

    Having the last world has nothing to do with it, Matt and I are only trying to figure out how you come to the conclusions that you do, in your book. They don’t make sense, and they do not help parents in the least.

    And what on Earth does road rage have to do with video games?

    Columbine started with a violent video game?!? Are you serious? No, Columbine started with two neglected kids. And to be more specific, it started with guns that shoot people, that those kids fired.

    That video game detox clinic article was a joke, and you know it. Referencing that in the first place is still mind boggling to me. You use it to make your point stronger, yet the detox clinic itself has no legs to stand on.

    I have yet to see how you have proven us wrong Greg. But good luck with that book festival of yours.

    And just for the record, and full disclosure (yes, even us here at Blogcritics know what that means) I have finally had the wonderful opportunity to read the entirety of your book. I am just glad I wan’t driving at the time, because I might have had a bout of road rage. (that was a joke, fyi).

    But seriously, your book does scare me. Parents are going to read this and be more misinformed than if they hadn’t even looked into the subject of video games.

  • http://www.njiska.com Jason “Njiska” Westhaver

    Greg you talk about respect and character, yet you seem to display so little yourself.

    Opening comment wasn’t “I think you missed some points” or “I have to disagree with your review of my book. I feel you missed…”. You know, somekind of respectful crituqe. No your opening comment was:

    A Roast is not a fair Review!

    I intentionally sent you a PR , knowing that you’d give a critical, but I hoped fair, review of my book. I didn’t realize that your web site header says, it would be “a sinister plot.” I only wish that you had informed me that I had been bloodied (like in some of the violent video games), so I could have responded earlier and not had to wait till after I sent you a Thank You note for requesting a review copy of my book.

    Further more you continued down this path by attacking Ken, who only made a fair and respectful comment, by saying, “Unfortunately, I discovered that both you and Ken can’t walk away when you’re wrong, as most adults would. ”

    That comment itself is not a fair comment. It shows you feels you’re right and that everyone else is wrong. You did not conclusively prove them wrong, you merely stated they were. That’s a sign of arrogance and disrepsect for the intelligence shown by the other commentors.

    Blogcritics is a website that reviews material and obviously our reviewer didn’t think your material was very good. If you beleive it really is and he’s just being unfair, then you have nothing to worry about, other reviews would prove this one wrong and you’d get your good press.

    If you feel compelled to prove him wrong then please do so without spite, disrespect and sarcasm. Most of all please avoid the melodrama. If you think there’s no respect being shown for you, then take the high road and show it yourself.

  • http://www.njiska.com Jason “Njiska” Westhaver

    Oh by the way about this:

    But, I’ve had stock in Nvidia Corp. for some time now. I’m sure you know that they make the best graphics chips and that they’re used in most game consoles.

    ATI Corp makes equally impressive graphics chips and they’re used in the Xbox 360, Wii and Gamecube. Nvidia is only used in the XBox and Playstation 3 and that chip has been critized because it appears to be based on the G70 core not the G71 or newer G80 or G90 architexture.

  • http://www.morethings.com/log Al Barger

    Brother Paprocki- I missed this when it was first published, as I don’t care about video games really at all.

    But this was a beautifully brutal review – not through name calling, but actual thoughtful analysis.

    Mr Chester’s cheesy carrying on about the “sinister cabal” of course just makes it sweeter – and inspired me to submit this review to Digg.

    Good work.

  • http://www.noface4film.com/ Kaonashi

    Gregory Chester, perhaps you should meet Jack Thompson. I think you two will get along well.

  • Jennie McKenzie

    Thank you for this helpful review. For a truly exceptional look at parenting, see Jan Hunt’s wonderful book The Natural Child: Parenting from the Heart.

  • http://www.KidsCanDoAnything.com Fred Wild

    Yep. Teaching kids character when they’re young is SO, SO important. Coupled with the fact that it’s friggin’ hard to do…it’s a tall order.

    Good article!