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Book Review: Nutritional Genomics: The Impact of Dietary Regulation of Gene Function on Human Disease, Ed. by Wayne R. Bidlack

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“Recent evidence from preclinical models suggests that prenatal and early postnatal diet may alter DNA methylation of important genes or genomic regions which could influence the risk the developing disease, such as cancer, later in life.” (pg 7) Given this statement is of utmost importance for future studies in curbing diseases, Nutritional Genomics: The Impact of Dietary Regulation of Gene Function on Human Disease is a forerunner for students, scientists, nutritionists and health practitioners to understand how diet and the person’s genetic makeup play a role in health and predisposition to disease.

Although the intent of this book is to be a resource for researchers, educators, and policy makers, it is loaded with data, research, references, and charts that will not only help understand inclination of healthy or unhealthy bodies, but it will play a key role in setting a plan for patients by those who are concerned with strong and viable gene function. Understanding altering gene-linked chronic diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer will assist the practitioner in finding ways to delay or prevent these diseases through diet.

Nutritional Genomics is a precursor to understanding genetics, disease and health. Nutritionists and disease prevention practitioners will relish the studies and new information, while patients will see end results in a positive manner. Recommended!

(Reviewed by Irene Watson for Reader Views)

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  • http://www.lunch.com/DrJosephSMaresca Dr Joseph S Maresca

    We need to tax junk food more significantly. Childhood diabetes has been on the rise in recent decades. The standard sugary soda has nearly 40 grams of sugar when 25-37 grams of sugar is the total daily dietary allotment.

    In addition, the circumcision practice could be part of the reason for perceived trauma later on in life, as well as autoimmune issues. This area needs more research and scientific scrutiny.

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