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Book Review: Moe Howard Died For Our Sins: Made-to-Fit Tales for the Maladjusted by Dale Andrew White

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Moe Howard Died For Our Sins: Made-to-Fit Tales for the Maladjusted, by Dale Andrew White, is a collection of stories with a twisted point of view. To start, "The South's Greatest Writer" recalls the death of Hannah Rath, whose words were about as deadly as her mouth. Eccentricity is too mild a term for the main character, since she learned from an early age that she did not have to conform to other people's standards.

As a writer, Rath managed to get her works published despite being trash. Not only does she have a poor concept of plot and characters, her deluded sense of self assumes critical errors will not be noticed.

"Mightier than the Sword" examines the issue of libel. Deadlier than any profanity used, it's the one word every journalist dreads. When a local arts critic says exactly what he thinks of a performance by The Groatsworth Girls, he is hauled into court after the ladies get offended. However, the jury also has a chance to see the performance for themselves before deciding whether or not to agree with his column.

"Nature of the Beasts" looks at prejudice from the standpoint of what happens when pigs try to move into a neighborhood outside their sty. There is a twist at the end that proves the point of the title.

"Life of the Party" was perhaps my favorite story of all. The Grim Reaper is given the surprise of his life when the mission he goes on turns out to be something else entirely. The original task turns out to be simply sidetracked.

"The Bells of Griswald Stump" takes on a cantankerous old coot who decides to run for public office. As someone who thinks voting is important, I appreciated the message sent.

Although not for everyone's taste, there are gems in this book nonetheless.

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