Today on Blogcritics
Home » Books » Book Reviews » Book Review: Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Best Practices by Siegfried Jagott and Joel Stidley

Book Review: Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Best Practices by Siegfried Jagott and Joel Stidley

Please Share...Tweet about this on Twitter0Share on Facebook0Share on Google+0Share on LinkedIn0Pin on Pinterest0Share on TumblrShare on StumbleUpon0Share on Reddit0Email this to someone

Email is a gradual offshoot of the telecommunication revolution brought about by successive innovations such as telegraphy and the invention of telephone. Telegraphy and telex are some of the pre-cursors to full-fledged text messages over email.

Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 does an exhaustive coverage of the Microsoft exchange technologies and provides tips and tricks at all stages of the deployment and usage of the Microsoft Exchange Server and hence a useful reference.

Few of the people using the office email would comprehend the complexity of the implementation behind it. One of the popular softwares for office collaboration, Microsoft Exchange Server can be briefly considered as the server side of the client-server application software. Some of the other competitive mail server technologies which come to mind include Sendmail, Eudora, IBM Lotus Notes and the Oracle Communications Messaging Exchange Server.

One of the important components of any office collaboration software suite is the instant messenger. Given that there are also open source instant messengers such as Pidgin, Qnext, Trillian, etc.  in addition to the conventional IM such as Microsoft Communicator, there are possibilities for MS Exchange Server plugins to work with some of these. Instead of overlooking this aspect, there is explanation of Office Communication Server 2007R2 Integration with Exchange Server 2010 UM in the chapter on unified messaging.

The target audience for this book are technical consultants and managers already in grips with the common administrative tasks done by exchange administrators and looking for utilizing the product to the maximum possible.

The book is divided into four parts of planning, designing, upgrading and then moving onto deployment and management of Exchange Server. This is more a reference kind of book and not for the beginners who might need slightly more illustrated and well-defined examples.

There are no labs and solutions which might be expected in typical certification books. This undoubtedly is a book recommended for the Microsoft Exchange Professional. The medium to advanced techie with aspirations towards being one such Exchange professional will be much helped with the expertise of the authors as in this book.

Powered by

About Ganadeva Bandyopadhyay