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Book Review: Managing Thought: How Do Your Thoughts Rule Your World? by Mary J. Lore

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You would have to live in a cave to have avoided any knowledge of the relatively recent viral success of The Secret and the slew of books, movies, articles, and websites devoted to the Law of Attraction, or the principle that we attract what we think about, that since "thoughts become things" if we change how we think we will change our lives.

While I am generally pretty cynical about such new-agey psychobabble, my life experience shows that at minimum a more positive and open outlook on life and on oneself does in fact dramatically change one's life. Once I start looking for things to be grateful for, appreciating my life and what I had around me, and aspiring to more greatness and whatever the world had to offer me, my life improved tremendously. I went from being miserable, trying to connect with my husband, raise a difficult teenage boy while running a successful but draining Pilates studio, filing for bankruptcy and being sued in bankruptcy court, and being thousands of dollars in debt – to living and working with my husband at an exclusive high-end Caribbean resort and spa. Life is good and really, the only thing I really changed was my attitude.

While the concept that my thoughts create my world is not foreign to me, I have never been that comfortable with the books on the market that promote a new way of thinking. Too much spirituality and judgment often comes through. So I approached Managing Thought with some trepidation. I am happy to say that my fears were unfounded and that Mary J. Lore has managed to put out a straightforward, easy to understand, no bullshit guide to harness the power of positive thinking.

The book is written in a conversational workbook style, with questions, checklists, and exercises to assist in your developmental process. There are more exercises and support materials on the Managing Thought website, including worksheets and a free self-assessment.

If you are remotely interested in learning more about the connection between thoughts and things, but have been turned off by the majority of books on the market, I highly recommend giving Managing Thought a try.

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