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Book Review: ‘Ezekiel Saw the Wheel’ by Willie James Webb

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Ezekiel Saw the WheelEzekiel Saw the Wheel: Can You See the Cross?, as described by author Willie James Webb, is a book that “confronts graphically, artfully, scientifically, lawfully, ethnically and spiritually the ignorance, callousness and arrogance toward the revelatory message of God contained in the Bible.”

I thought, judging from the title of the book, that this would be a text about the author’s interpretation of the vision of the prophet Ezekiel, but the title was actually chosen to illustrate the universal consistency of the of the wheel and the cross.  My limited understanding of Ezekiel’s vision describes a throne above four living creatures that had wheels within wheels, and that seated on the throne was Jesus Christ.  The gist of what I got out of this book was that man has been straying from God for over 5,000 years and that continuation down the path we are traveling will ensure the destruction of the Human race.

Early in the book the author talks a lot about science versus religion and how certain secular groups are working towards a “Godless” society by rallying to remove the word “God” from the Pledge of Allegiance and the word “Christ” from Christmas, etc.  Webb goes on to describe his thoughts on the “isms” and ideology existing in American society and how they keep us secularly bound.  There is extensive writing about the dangers to society when our leaders are driven by these “isms” and a list of characteristics to aid in the recognition of these traits in our leaders.  This is followed by several proposed diagnostic evaluations to be used to determine the capability of individuals running for leadership roles within our government. Webb uses several diagrams of wheels for discussion including the wheel of creation, the wheel of justice, the wheel of the12 tribes of Israel, and the wheel of the12 Disciples of Christ.

I found Ezekiel Saw the Wheel  to be a very difficult book to follow — in my opinion due to the generally negative tone.  I cannot subscribe to the hell and damnation nature of the writing; however, I’m sure this book will definitely appeal to a certain audience.  I think the author would benefit greatly from a second (or third) thorough editing job as there were many grammatical errors throughout the book, including a significant mistake on the back cover that referenced how Webb received a “covenanted” instead of “coveted” award.

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