Home / Gaming / Board and Card Games / Board Game Review: ‘The Magic Path of Yoga’

Board Game Review: ‘The Magic Path of Yoga’

Please Share...Print this pageTweet about this on TwitterShare on Facebook0Share on Google+0Pin on Pinterest0Share on Tumblr0Share on StumbleUpon0Share on Reddit0Email this to someone

Many parents these days are looking for ways to get kids up, active, and away from their electronic devices. The Magic Path of Yoga from Upside-Down Games takes a look at a tried-and-true method of exercise that has lasted thousands of years. Yoga, and particularly its stretching aspect, has physical benefits of toning muscles, building core strength, and improving balance, concentration, and flexibility. Upside-Down carries several Yoga-themed games, but The Magic Path of Yoga combines stretches, trivia, and competition as their headline game.

magicpathofyogaDesigned for two players or two teams of players aged six and up, and with kids particularly in mind, Magic Path is reminiscent of an older style of board games with rolling dice to move around a board of multi-colored squares. Blue, green, and red squares correlate to three decks of individual yoga moves, such as the Butterfly Pose (baddha konasana) tucking in one’s ankles all the way to the thigh or the Standing Forward Bend (uttanasana) laying one’s hands flat on the floor beyond touching one’s toes. Each stretch is listed in the booklet with directions on how to get into them appropriately. Older players might recognize many of these stretches from track and field days, prepping muscles for heavier workouts.

In the game, when players land on a stretching square, they must perform the stretch and hold it for ten seconds. Successfully completing the pose means the players get to keep the card. White squares are for team stretches, and yellow cards contain trivia questions, such as “Fiber, which aids in digestion, is found mainly in…” with a series of multiple choice answers. Once a team has collected all five colors of cards, they may tempt to land on a “Jump Square” that allows them to hop to the OM symbol track in the middle of the board. Players then continue to roll and play until their token lands exactly on the central black OM square.

The Magic Path of Yoga is packed with learning potential. The booklet that describes the stretches also contains outlines of the major organs and bones along with information about yoga itself. The eight “steps” of yoga discuss different facets of disciplines, physical, mental, and spiritual, prompting players to slow down, breathe, and meditate rather than analyze.

Ultimately, the mechanics of The Magic Path of Yoga make it to be a competition game racing to the middle square. The requirement to roll the exact number on the die to land on the OM may seem frustrating to players in a hurry to win, but that is exactly the point of the game. Magic Path is about the journey rather than the destination, as the old saying goes, and players will feel the calming rush of stretches as they allow themselves patience to play. The Magic Path of Yoga is a great way to hold kids’ attention while introducing them to healthier, calmer, more active living.

Powered by
Many parents these days are looking for ways to get kids up, active, and away from their electronic devices. The Magic Path of Yoga from Upside-Down Games takes a look at a tried-and-true method of exercise that has lasted thousands of years. Yoga, and particularly its stretching aspect, has physical benefits of toning muscles, building core strength, and improving balance, concentration, and flexibility. Upside-Down carries several Yoga-themed games, but The Magic Path of Yoga combines stretches, trivia, and competition as their headline game. Designed for two players or two teams of players aged six and up, and with kids particularly…

Review Overview

50

Three out of Five Stars

User Rating: 3.23 ( 6 votes)
50

About Jeff Provine

Jeff Provine is a Composition professor, novelist, cartoonist, and traveler of three continents. His latest book is a collection of local ghost legends, Campus Ghosts of Norman, Oklahoma.
  • Dr Joseph S Maresca

    The game may be worth the investment if it is proven to help in carefully constructed polling of child users.