Today on Blogcritics
Home » Bleak House, or Funny No More

Bleak House, or Funny No More

Please Share...Print this pageTweet about this on Twitter0Share on Facebook0Share on Google+0Pin on Pinterest0Share on TumblrShare on StumbleUpon0Share on Reddit0Email this to someone

Kurt Vonnegut is a socialist pacifist with a romantic/tragic view of life forever haunted by the specter of suicide: his mother’s in 1944, his own failed attempt in 1984. As such, his view of life and mankind has grown succeedingly more dim over time – the trajectory is clearly visible in his work, Slapstick from ’79 being the last novel of his I could even finish.

Now he is 80 and any remnant of romanticism in his doomed worldview has been squeezed out by accumulated tragedy, and he is just a bitter old man regarding the affairs of man – he still likes music, though. In These Times speaks with him:

    My feeling from talking to readers and friends is that many people are beginning to despair. Do you think that we’ve lost reason to hope?

    I myself feel that our country, for whose Constitution I fought in a just war, might as well have been invaded by Martians and body snatchers. Sometimes I wish it had been. What has happened, though, is that it has been taken over by means of the sleaziest, low-comedy, Keystone Cops-style coup d’etat imaginable. And those now in charge of the federal government are upper-crust C-students who know no history or geography, plus not-so-closeted white supremacists, aka “Christians,” and plus, most frighteningly, psychopathic personalities, or “PPs.”

    To say somebody is a PP is to make a perfectly respectable medical diagnosis, like saying he or she has appendicitis or athlete’s foot. The classic medical text on PPs is The Mask of Sanity by Dr. Hervey Cleckley. Read it! PPs are presentable, they know full well the suffering their actions may cause others, but they do not care. They cannot care because they are nuts. They have a screw loose!

    And what syndrome better describes so many executives at Enron and WorldCom and on and on, who have enriched themselves while ruining their employees and investors and country, and who still feel as pure as the driven snow, no matter what anybody may say to or about them? And so many of these heartless PPs now hold big jobs in our federal government, as though they were leaders instead of sick.

    What has allowed so many PPs to rise so high in corporations, and now in government, is that they are so decisive. Unlike normal people, they are never filled with doubts, for the simple reason that they cannot care what happens next. Simply can’t. Do this! Do that! Mobilize the reserves! Privatize the public schools! Attack Iraq! Cut health care! Tap everybody’s telephone! Cut taxes on the rich! Build a trillion-dollar missile shield! Fuck habeas corpus and the Sierra Club and In These Times, and kiss my ass!

    ….As a writer and artist, have you noticed any difference between how the cultural leaders of the past and the cultural leaders of today view their responsibility to society?

    Responsibility to which society? To Nazi Germany? To the Stalinist Soviet Union? What about responsibility to humanity in general? And leaders in what particular cultural activity? I guess you mean the fine arts. I hope you mean the fine arts. … Anybody practicing the fine art of composing music, no matter how cynical or greedy or scared, still can’t help serving all humanity. Music makes practically everybody fonder of life than he or she would be without it. Even military bands, although I am a pacifist, always cheer me up.

    But that is the power of ear candy. The creation of such a universal confection for the eye, by means of printed poetry or fiction or history or essays or memoirs and so on, isn’t possible. Literature is by definition opinionated. It is bound to provoke the arguments in many quarters, not excluding the hometown or even the family of the author. Any ink-on-paper author can only hope at best to seem responsible to small groups or like-minded people somewhere. He or she might as well have given an interview to the editor of a small-circulation publication.

It is true that the power of music is its subjectivity and ability to convey emotion, or in Suzanne Langer’s view, convey the architecture of emotion, without having to resort to words. But words can transcend opinion too – it is a measure of Vonnegut’s diminution that the opinions expressed in his more recent novels are so transparent and the discussion of them has come to center on these opinions rather than the beauty of his writing and thought.

More on Vonnegut at 80 here.

Powered by

About Eric Olsen

  • http://www.oakhaus.blogspot Bill Sherman

    This is not an unusual trajectory for satirists to take: think of the later Mark Twain. Perhaps as one gets older, one’s faith in the power of metaphor and ambiguity lessens?

  • Eric Olsen

    Very interesting thought Bill, thanks. There is something in there about losing faith in the power of humor as well_humor enlightens and redeems across barriers as does music.