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Author Archives: Jackson Murphy

More than just a Home Run

Tom Stanton's latest book “Hank Aaron and the Home Run That Changed America” takes a detailed look inside the quest to break Babe Ruth's home run record. Read More »

Cast Away in an Airport Terminal

Pretty much every review of the new film “The Terminal” focuses on what else Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks have done. That’s a lot to live up to. But this is the story is of a man unable to leave an airport terminal due to a crisis in his generic East European nation. Then comedy and other emotions ensue when ... Read More »

Exploring the Mediterranean with Muddy Boots

Robert Kaplan's newest book, Mediterranean Winter: The Pleasures of History and Landscape in Tunisia, Sicily, Dalmatia, and Greece tells the story of a series of trips the author took to the Mediterranean as a struggling freelance writer. Read More »

Inside the Blog Campaign

The 2004 election is still more than 10 months away but the campaigns have already incorporated the latest in cool and are blogging. When the USA Today is talking about the power of blogs and their influence on campaigns it is more than just a passing fad. But like learning how sausages and hot dogs are made, watching a campaign ... Read More »

Inside The Invisible Primary

This is a time before the race really starts cooking, before normal people even think about tuning in, and where those ambitious enough to run for president pander to crowds at pancake breakfasts and make speeches in living rooms to crowds of thirty or less. It happens all across New Hampshire and Iowa in a time author Walter Shapiro calls the "Invisible Primary". Read More »

Walking on Broken Glass

That kind of outrage by the press is often bewildering and mostly just boils down to a major case of the “superiorities”. That’s why the new film “Shattered Glass” is such a horror for most journalists. The keepers of integrity in public life and the shapers of so much opinion can never be seen as infallible or corruptible or worse just plain wrong. Read More »

Why Master and Commander is so good

The idea of the lone ship on the far side acting on its own on simple but direct general orders is mostly a notion for bygone era. The fact that navy ships once roamed the planet free from communication and orders, yet a mission somehow remained is pretty remarkable. Read More »

Kill Bill and the Wave of Globalization

One exiting development in some recent films is the seamless integration of globalization. Say what you will about Quentin Tarantino’s bloody new homage to kung-fu and spaghetti westerns Kill Bill Vol. 1 but it is as close to a movie can get to removing national borders. It’s about as simple a tale as can be told, but Tarantino’s thrown in ... Read More »

It’s the style, stupid

Style is the reason why Starbucks can charge so much for a Latte or Mocha. Put simply, you aren’t just paying for the coffee. It goes well beyond that. As Postrel investigates further, she finds that Starbuck’s is about the artwork, music, layout, design, even the smell, and general feeling you get when you walk in. Read More »