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Author Archives: K. George

I have been a film editor for some twenty years, cutting shorts and features, drama and documentary, theatrical and television. Since my earliest memories of movies — watching Omar Sharif as Ghengis Khan, Ursula Andress as She in the Odeon or Regent or Pavilion in Chelmsford, Essex, in the early ’60s, or catching King Kong or Quatermass 2 on a small black and white television in our living room in White Roding — what engaged me, and still engages me, is story and the techniques of storytelling. Even in my documentary work, the concern is always with how to shape the material into a compelling narrative. When I returned to school in my mid-20s, I started hanging out at the University of Winnipeg student newspaper office and eventually became the weekly film reviewer — an excellent gig because it meant I got to see a lot of movies for free. No doubt that experience helped when I fortuitously got an opportunity to go to Los Angeles and interview David Lynch and many of his collaborators on the production of Eraserhead for an article for Cinefantastique. And that article in turn landed me a job on the production of Lynch’s Dune, a remarkable six months in Mexico helping to document the day-to-day details of production on one of the most expensive movies ever made. Eventually returning to Winnipeg, I wrote fairly regularly about film and other matters for Border Crossings, an arts quarterly. And then, in 1989, I joined the Winnipeg Film Group and set about making my own first film, a 9-minute comedy in the form of a dubious documentary called Incident at Pickerel Fillet. This was followed by a short piece in a collaborative project called The Exquisite Corpse, and then a more ambitious comedy parodying old-style sci-fi movie serials called The Adventures of Stella Starr of the Galaxy Rangers in the 23rd Century. These experiences led inexorably to a career in film editing, mostly on documentaries. Over the years, I have also sporadically continued writing — a number of unfilmed scripts, plus a brief history of the Winnipeg Film Group for Cinema Scope, and most recently a chapter on filmmaker John Kozak in the WFG’s anthology about Winnipeg directors, Place.

Blu-ray Review: ‘Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion’ (The Criterion Collection)

investigation

Elio Petri's Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion offers one of the most incisive dissections of the pathology of power ever committed to film and Criterion does an excellent job of bringing this masterpiece to home video. Read More »

DVD Review: ‘Combat! – The Complete Series’

Vic Morrow (r) with Sal Mineo

TV's longest-running WW2 series remains a landmark—not only for the consistent quality of the production over five seasons, but also for its influential use of movie-like techniques on a weekly episodic series. Read More »

DVD Review: ‘The Uninvited’ (Criterion Collection)

the_uninvited

Lewis Allen's 1944 feature The Uninvited practically invents the classic serious ghost story on film. Read More »

Movie Review: ‘Dear Mr. Watterson’

c&h

Dear Mr Watterson is an enthusiastic fan's appreciation of the comic strip Calvin and Hobbes which also traces the history of this art form and the tensions between creativity and business. Read More »

DVD Review: “3 Films by Roberto Rossellini Starring Ingrid Bergman” (Criterion Collection)

stromboli2

Criterion's 5-disk set of the collaborations between director Roberto Rossellini and actress Ingrid Bergman may well be their finest release of the year. Read More »

DVD Review: ‘American Experience: War of the Worlds’

welles_directing

The PBS American Experience documentary about Orson Welles' famous War of the Worlds radio broadcast gives a fascinating analysis of how the 1938 Halloween prank managed to panic a large number of Americans. Read More »

DVD Review: “The Secret of Crickley Hall”

Olivia Cooke & Iain De Caestecker in the BBC adaptation of James Herbert's The Secret of Crickley Hall

Joe Ahearne's BBC adaptation of the late James Herbert's The Secret of Crickley Hall is a well-told traditional English ghost story featuring a rich, unsettling atmosphere and an excellent cast. Read More »

Blu-ray Review: ‘From Up on Poppy Hill’

from_up_on_poppy_hill

The richness of the design and photography imbue the story of a tentative romance between two high school students in Yokohama in 1963 with a deep sense of nostalgia. Read More »

Blu-ray Review: ‘The Manson Family’

Marcelo Games as Charles Manson with two of his followers in Jim Van Bebber's The Manson Family

Jim Van Bebber's "The Manson Family" is a remarkable example of the power of obsession to push a filmmaker beyond his normal limitations. Read More »

Blu-ray Review: ‘Things to Come’ (The Criterion Collection)

The Space Gun featured in the climax of H.G. Wells' Things to Come (1936)

The new Criterion Blu-ray is probably the best we'll ever see this problematic science fiction epic. Read More »