Today on Blogcritics

Always On

Please Share...Tweet about this on Twitter0Share on Facebook0Share on Google+0Share on LinkedIn0Pin on Pinterest0Share on TumblrShare on StumbleUpon0Share on Reddit0Email this to someone

Especially following a holiday weekend with some actual downtime for contrast, who among us cannot relate this this punch in the kidneys? In a way I am fortunate because I have learned I simply can’t concentrate fully on more than one thing at a time, but I find I do crave the stimulation of data input on an ongoing basis thoroughout the “work” day, which truth be told is almost every day. I would bet virtually everyone who reads this can relate to some aspect of this story:

    The ubiquity of technology in the lives of executives, other businesspeople and consumers has created a subculture of the Always On – and a brewing tension between productivity and freneticism. For all the efficiency gains that it seemingly provides, the constant stream of data can interrupt not just dinner and family time, but also meetings and creative time, and it can prove very tough to turn off.

    Some people who are persistently wired say it is not uncommon for them to be sitting in a meeting and using a hand-held device to exchange instant messages surreptitiously – with someone in the same meeting. Others may be sitting at a desk and engaging in conversation on two phones, one at each ear. At social events, or in the grandstand at their children’s soccer games, they read news feeds on mobile devices instead of chatting with actual human beings.

    These speed demons say they will fall behind if they disconnect, but they also acknowledge feeling something much more powerful: they are compulsively drawn to the constant stimulation provided by incoming data. Call it O.C.D. – online compulsive disorder.

    ….Dr. Hallowell and John Ratey, an associate professor at Harvard and a psychiatrist with an expertise in attention deficit disorder, are among a growing number of physicians and sociologists who are assessing how technology affects attention span, creativity and focus. Though many people regard multitasking as a social annoyance, these two and others are asking whether it is counterproductive, and even addicting.

    ….ACCORDING to research compiled by David E. Meyer, a psychology professor at the University of Michigan, multitaskers actually hinder their productivity by trying to accomplish two things at once. Mr. Meyer has found that people who switch back and forth between two tasks, like exchanging e-mail and writing a report, may spend 50 percent more time on those tasks than if they work on them separately, completing one before starting the other. [NY Times]

Powered by

About Eric Olsen

  • mike

    A bunch of baloney. I have no trouble multi-tasking–oh, wait, let me get the phone–oops, pager’s beeping–hey, look at all that spam in my inbox–wow, market’s up, better stop shorting my company’s stock–here’s the mail, what? I’m being sued by Hilary Rosen for using kazaa?! That bitc–beep! finished downloading Bread’s Greatest Hits, about time–wish the boss would stop staring at me during these meetings– damn! I just sent my whole hard drive to print–now, where was I? Oh, yes, multi-tasking. Doable, very doable. It’s all a question of discipline. Focus and finish, that’s my motto!

  • http://www.morethings.com/log Al Barger

    Besides focus and efficiency issues, how many of these IMs and e-mails and phone calls and such are actually about anything? A lot of folks could lose half or two thirds of their communications and not in fact be missing anything substantive at all.