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A Trip to Bahrain: The Whore of Arabia

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Suddenly the black robes of her Abaya, tempted by the wind sheepishly rushing in through the open glass doors of the Crowne Plaza hotel lobby, fluttered wildly, rustled around teasingly, and finally flowed apart showing her soft milky thighs decorated with henna dyed in elaborate designs. Her lipstuck lips and eyeshadowed eyes broke into an unembarrassed grin and she openly rejoiced in her shocking nakedness. The Sheikh, presumably her husband, looking light and cool in his perfect-white Thobe and Keffiyeh simply strolled ahead, unconcerned, as if it was a logical order in the scheme of things that the seductive appeal of his wife's inner flesh must be swooned over by the rest of the horny world.

Welcome to the Royal Kingdom of Bahrain.

Islam is the coolest thing in this tiny, comfortably rich, air-conditioned empire of the Al-Khalifa dynasty. Some of the other elegant specimens include the beautiful, mischievous women and handsome, gracefully sculptured men.

Bahrain is the watering hole of the Gulf. It is the place whose one of the many palaces houses the kingdom's most famous royal guest — Michael Jackson. It is the island of pearls. It is an archipelago of 33 spectacular islands, one of which was used as a burial ground for hundreds of years by the people of the surrounding civilizations.

With most of the land reclaimed from the Persian Gulf, the entire country – including its districts, neighborhoods and even avenues – is crisscrossed with clear, sparkling, deep blue sea water. The islands are connected by a series of sleek steel bridges. The sky is blue. The sun shines white. The burning wind sears the skin. The desert is a constant presence but this writer's first edition copy of Andrew Morton's Diana – Her True Story had no dust layered on it, even after it was kept outside under a hot sunny sky, beside the spectacular Al Dana resort's swimming pool, for one whole day.

Bahrain is one hell of an artificial beautiful land.

It is unbelievable fun.

The Fun Starts Here – declared an advertisement on the $1.2 billion King Fahd Causeway (that can be seen from space) to the weekend crowd of neighboring Saudi Arabians not long after they filtered into the Bahrain side of the friendly international border. As the fancy, left-handed cars of the decadent multitude drove over the smooth four-lane highway built over the Persian Gulf by the Saudi government, connecting the Holy Land of Mecca-Medina to the pleasure pastures of Bahrain, the draped girls chucked off their Abayas and climbed over to take seats beside their men friends at the front of the vehicles.

They all were driving towards Manama.

The sea gulls soared up and down the sea waters that shone in the bright starry night on both sides of the highway (the sea-water shines in different shades of green and blue during the day), while the girls and boys prepared to play it bad, really bad.

Wednesdays and Thursdays are the happening nights in Bahrain, while Friday is the Sunday of the Gulf World. Discos were packed. The muscular hunks and chiseled babes of the U.S. Navy base at Al Juffair in downtown Manama gathered around the night clubs of five-star hotels. The spoilt sons of upper-class Bahrain dads, who practically constitute the entire male youth population of the country, ogled at the eager tits of U.S. Army women who dressed so imaginatively that nothing was left to imagination. The Yankee bad boys took willing Sheikhas in their arms into the dark corner of the disco and did naughty things. Nobody raised a brow. Everybody enjoyed.

Sex is a beautiful thing. Breast to breast. Thighs to thighs.

Indian singer Himesh Reshammiya was on. Everybody was dancing to his Jhalak Dikhla Ja chartbuster. It was a dimly-lit, poor man's bar not far from Al-Juffair. There was a dancing platform in the center. Men were mostly dancing in groups. The time was around two in the morning. The air was foggy with Marlboro smoke. Fat, mustachioed Malayali mechanics had their arms slung around the shoulders of jeans-and-tiny-tops clad Bangladeshi whores. Pakistani security guards were stationed at strategic corners to pre-empt any possible fistfights over the all-giving, dark-complexioned, sleepy-looking Sri Lankan waitresses. Handsome Arab men were dancing and arguing deals for a quick whang-bang with the whores.

Some of the sexy Bangladeshis were openly counting BDs (Bahrain Dinars). They were smiling and suggesting to every man around and were ready to exchange a kiss for a kiss, and a hug for a hug.

It was Thursday night and the hard-working expatriate men were ready to splurge. The sluts knew it and they wanted it all – hard currencies, harder erections, and lots of fun!

Thursday evening and everybody was flocking to the Seef Mall. Next to it stands the tallest building in Bahrain – Al Moayed Tower – that houses the headquarters of the construction company of the same name whose Indian employer was killed by the Taliban in Afghanistan in 2006.

Incredibly handsome and finely-toned Arab playboys, dressed in chic Thobes, were walking in groups in the cold, sun-lit corridors of the mall that could have been anywhere in the planet. Pretty women, who knew they were pretty, walked around aimlessly, snobbishly pecking out their heads now and then, showing off their delicately designed Abayas. Abundance of finely-stitched golden embroideries and rich, sophisticated brocade work turned the black Abayas into the hippest fashion statement.

Even Islam could be cool.

Diana would have felt at home in these elegant robes if she would have survived the Paris car-crash and married her Egyptian lover Dodi Fayed.

Muslim women in Bahrain, unlike their sisters in the neighboring Saudi Arabia, are free to dress in the garments of their choice. Abayas are not forced on them and why they look so natural and beautiful in it is because they want to be draped in it. Because wearing it is not necessary. Because Abayas merely happen to be the fashionable costumes of choice.

A drive in the early morning hours of Friday: The night party was still on and in form. Numerous car makes – BMW, Lenor, Mitsubishi, Honda, Cadillac, Pajeros, Honda, Volkswagen, Bora, Fortuna – were parked on both sides of the highways in the twin cities of Manama and Al Muharraq. The headlights were switched off but the air conditioners were buzzing in a continuous hum. The cars, SUVs, and vans were gently rocking up and down. Mating games were on. Love-making was a serious job.

But the honk-less smoothways were not empty. Spoilt boys were driving down in shuttle speed. The whoosh of the vehicles echoed throughout the land before disappearing into the surrounding sea.

The wind was cool and generous in its windiness. The calm waters of the sea were rippling gently. It was around midnight, but the beach around Muharraq Bridge was crowded with cars.

Arab families – ladies in Abayas, gentleman in shorts and tee-shirts, children in knickers – had laid out carpets on the ground and were sitting, gossiping, and laughing. Braziers were lighted with coals, and kebabs and thick meat chunks were being roasted. Some of the ladies were swimming – in their Abayas! A few men were disturbing the quiet of the sea and the silence of the night by wildly driving the noisy sea scooters.

Young people were playing Arabic songs of the hip-hot Arab pop star Nancy Ajram. Men and boys from Saudi land were locked inside their cars and were busy boozing. Many of them had walked out into the shallow depths of the sea and were drinking on the bare rocks that jutted out of the water level. White European tourists were lolling around in bare minimum. Some business-minded people were swimming and peeking under the waters with their battery-charged torches – looking for pearls.

A thinly-built, tautly-muscled, lightly-bearded, hairy-chested boy attired in a rolled-up jeans and a baseball cup vomited beside his sports car. He was drunk and had consumed too much of tobacco. He complained of headache. His car stereo was playing Bob Marley.

The waters continued to roll gently.

The darkness of the night accentuated the top edges of the Bahrain skyline. The few lighted electric lights sparkled at the top of the dark, otherwise-switched-off-for-the-night skyscrapers. It appeared as if small shepherds' huts were twinkling on mountain tops. 

As the clock hands strike four, the waters reverberated with the reminder to Allah. The muezzins were imploring the faithful to come to prayer. Their sing-song voice was melodious and the entire city-state was immersed in the soothing chant of the mullahs. It could have been the ringing bells of the Vatican or the early morning Hindu devotional songs of Benares. The sound of Allah-Hu-Akbar was pleasant to the senses. It was okay to fall in love with Islam. 

After a night of driving around we were hungry. The car stopped by a sandwich shop. The clothes shop opposite was still open but we were told that the sandwiches were over and done with. We moved on. My companion was drunk and was driving crazily. A police van followed us. He quickly confused them by disappearing into the dark, unknown, narrow streets. The cops lost us. I was thrilled and scared – at the same time.

Friday morning: A glaring sun. Zero traffic. Vacant squares. Hard-playing folks had retired to their soft beds. Saudis had gone back to their austere land. Picnic was over. Till the next weekend.

Now on to the Monday morning blues. Oh, make it to Saturday morning.

[The author made a short trip to Bahrain in mid-June, 2006 ]
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About Mayank Austen Soofi

  • HC

    So ‘personal attacks are not allowed’ according to Blogcritics’ comment policy, under which they pledge to edit/delete ‘terms offensive to groups when used in a pejorative manner.’ This article labels a whole nation a ‘whore’. How much more offensive to a group can you be?

    Who compiles this stuff? Are they aware of their own guidelines, let alone common decency?

  • Eric Olsen

    HC, did you actually read the story? It’s quite positive toward the whore in question. Thanks Mayank!

    And the comment policy applies to comments

  • http://alienboysworld.blogspot.com Christopher Rose

    Yeah man, the comments policy is to prevent ad hominem attacks on the people who “live” on this site. Public figures are fair game though!

    Get it?

    Good!

  • troll

    super evocative writing Mayank…I can’t think of anything snarky to say…(except to HC who needs to delve into the ideas of Enlightenment)

    troll

  • Nancy

    I’m a little surprised the more straight-laced Muslims in neighboring populations haven’t said anything snarky about or to Bahrainis being somewhat on the non-observant, sinning side of Islamic restrictions & rules. Perhaps they keep their opinions & hands to home because the ultra-rich of Bahrain pay their dues by covertly supporting the more fundamentalist causes, a la the ruling family of Saudi Arabia?

  • Ruvy from Jerusalem

    If you want to run a society that is so straitlaced and “virtuous”, you need outlets. The more “virtuous” Saudi society tries to appear to be, the more the rich and playful will sin it up in Bahrain.

  • Nancy

    Do rank & file Muslims even know about what goes on in Bahrain? What are their attitudes?

  • Ruvy from Jerusalem

    Reality is usually indicated by what the adman tries to sell. On my site there was a Google Ad in Hebrew for Israeli travelers to Bahrain selling travel insurance. It may not be just Saudis whoring it up in Bahrain.

  • http://ruinedbyreading.blogspot.com Mayank ‘Austen’ Singh

    I regret if folks are hurt by me calling Bahrain the ‘whore of arabia’. Of course if anybody cared to read it through the end, it would be quite clear that I meant it in the best sense of the term. I strongly feel that Bahrain is what an ideal islamic country should be. It lets the people follow their life style without obstructing their personal space. I also feel that Saudi ruling class do not mind the relatively freer society of their neighbouring country. They realise that it is good to have a release valve for their countrymen who need to air out from their pressure cooker of a country every now and then.

    I stayed in Bahrain just for three days and now it all appears so unreal and dreamy. I wonder if anyone could fund a few-months stay for me there so as to enable me to write a series of pieces on that fantastic nation. What I have written in this piece is just one aspect of Bahrain. There are so many things to observe, see, study there….yes in that tiny kingdom! Its politics, its family values, its shia-sunni tensions, its society, its tremendous foreign workforce. Oh, the possibilities are endless.

  • http://blogs.epicindia.com/leapinthedark Richard Marcus

    Bahrain sounds like the Berlin that Chrstopher Isherwood wrote about in the late twenties early thirties. There is a certain desperation underneath the having fun, like the fear that it could be all taken away from them at any time.

    It also sounds like it’s only the very wealthy can have this liberation, and these are all the children of the idle rich.

    But this was beautifully written and wonderfully evocative. If only all travel writers had your eloquance. Your descriptions of the islands and the sea was was vivid enough to allow me to picture it in my mind.

    Thank you for the nice trip to the Gulf

    Richard

  • sara

    Have you actually ever been to Bahrain??

  • Ruvy from Jerusalem

    That ad in Hebrew for travel insurance to Bahrain is back, BTW. Mayank, I have to second Richard in his comments on your article…

    You did an excellent job. Thanks!

  • SFC SKI

    THe last time I was in Bahrain was in 1998, and after 6 months in the MAgic Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, it was a welcome change.
    I t sounds like it has become even more open and enjoyable
    I have seen both men and women, probably Saudi Nationals, go into the changing rooms at the mid point on the cause way in robes and abayas, and come in fashionable western clothes.
    Bahrain is worth spending some time in, no doubt. Great article.

  • http://ruinedbyreading.blogspot.com Mayank ‘Austen’ Singh

    Thanks Ruvy. Thanks Richard. It feels good to be decorated with such pleasant compliments. I’m very glad that my piece was liked so much. But Ruvy, are you from Jerusalem? That is one place I want to go to since a long long time. There are many reasons why I am in love with Jerusalem, but my true passion for that great city started after I started reading Amos Elon’s ‘Jerusalem – A City of Mirrors’. Oh Jerusalem! Will I ever be able to go there…..

  • SD

    Very eloquent and precisely written. You have turned a 3-day trip to Bahrain into a short literary master-piece Mr. Singh.

    But…as is the nature of people…there will be critics for every writer. Don’t let the positive comments blind you; the negative comments must also be appreciated and accepted. I live in a coastal city 50 minutes from Bahrain in Saudi Arabia and I personally understand where these people are coming from (and obviously several negative comments must have been deleted).

    The truth hurts…and Bahrainis (and even Saudis alike) are enjoying the ‘whore’ aspect of Arabia as it brings in money and pleasures but when it hits them in the face in this context…they are blinded by sheer patriotism…totally disregarding what they too were doing the past weekend and not knowing how much of hypocrites they are.

    All in all…good work

  • http://www.elitistpig.com Dave Nalle

    Bahrain sounds fantastic. It’s one of the few countries in the region I haven’t been to, and I wish I had. Your description reminds me of the more open Islamic society of the days of the Caliphate when a certain amount of corruption and decadence resulted in a cultural and social renaissance. It also suggested to me what Lebanon was on its way to becoming until the Syrians destroyed the country.

    Dave

  • Paul Roy

    Great piece Mayank. I spent a few days there back in the mid-90’s and it is just as you described. The United Arab Emirates is very similar, if I remember correctly.

  • gazelle

    I think the subtitle ” the godess of arabia ” might be more apt.

    best

  • gazelle

    #5 nancy: this is total bs.
    there are many exceptions ….
    of course there are contending lifestyles and viewoints… cant help you if you only see bible thumpers in america.

    best

  • gazelle

    #16 DN:

    Your description reminds me of the more open Islamic society of the days of the Caliphate when a certain amount of corruption and decadence resulted in a cultural and social renaissance.

    more bs. history shaken not stirred. just as dn likes it! please dont “remind” yourself of it.

    best

  • http://www.elitistpig.com Dave Nalle

    Sorry to have implied that I was actually alive at the time of the caliphate, gazelle. I suppose I should have said that it reminds me of the caliphate I have read about in literature from the period and in historical works. That better? The point is still entirely valid, though I know that you find history threatening.

    Dave

  • Ruvy in Jerusalem

    Mayank, if you ever make it here, give me a holler through BC or through my URL, and I’ll be glad to spot you some coffee and show you around. But if you write about the place, please don’t call it the “whore of Israel.” If you write about Tel Aviv, on the other hand…

  • BA

    Well… I’m not here to deny whatever really and actually goes on in Bahrain… but, my friend I think you really was directed to the black side of Bahrain, I don’t think you had the chance to shift your focus to see the conservative and really Practicing-Muslims!

    I’m sorry to Say that you really need to at the other perspective…

    EVERYONE..LISTEN TO THIS…EVERYWHERE IN THIS WORLD HAS THE DARK AND BRIGHT SIDE AS WELL AS THE BAD AND GOOD PEOPLE… BUT PLEASE NEXT TIME WHEN WANT TO TALK ABOUT THE RELIGION IT SELF “ISLAM” JUST MAKE SURE TO POINT OUT TO ITS PRINCIPLES NOT LOOKING AT THE INDIVIDUALS WHO ARE WRONGLY PRACTICING THE RELEGION…

    Next time my friend when you are coming let me so I take tot he other world that you haven’t get a glimpsed of…

  • bubu

    O plllllllllllz such a rep off i hear someones JELOUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUS!! 😉 just cause bahrain simply is the best country and were ever u come from just aint nice:P oh get a life hahahaha such a lozer !!! FREAK….!!:P Im LOVEin IT!!

  • http://ruinedbyreading.blogspot.com Mayank ‘Austen’

    Ruvy,
    Be assured. Jerusalem won’t be ‘The Whore of the Holy Land’. It just do not fit in. Uhmm…..what will it be? Uhmmmm…..The Blood Clot of Israel? The Cradle of the World? (No! Too cliched) The Citadel of Despair? The Cradle of Conflicts? Ah the possibilities are endless…..

    By the way thanks for the invitation for showing me around whenever I land there. Just in case if you happen to have a yearning for Delhi (The City of Tombs, The Seven Cities, The City of Djinns etvc.), let me know. You may stay at my place!

  • Passerby

    I’d love to go to Delhi as well. so many countries, so little time, or money, alas.

  • http://ruinedbyreading.blogspot.com Mayank ‘Austen’ Singh

    Passerby, who are you? What are your pursuits in life? If you are not a commited commander of Al Qaeda or any other terrorist organisation of any religious or political affliation, perhaps I may assist you out. I agree that the flight ticket to Delhi may be expansive (depending on where you live) but living in Delhi won’t cost you much.

  • http://- Maryam

    I agree fully with comment #23 BA.
    You really need to expand your viewpoint on bahrain if you seek to portray an accurate picture of the current corruption present; your words are limited since you’ve obviously looked at Bahrain from what is said to be the dark/ black prespective.

    Try again, visit us and take a look at both sides before you paint your dreadful picture of Bahrain as country.

  • http://- Maryam

    I agree fully with comment #23 BA.
    You really need to expand your viewpoint on bahrain if you seek to portray an accurate picture of the current corruption present; your words are limited since you’ve obviously looked at Bahrain from what is said to be the dark/ black prespective.

    Try again, visit us and take a look at both sides before you paint your dreadful picture of Bahrain as a country.

  • passerby

    I appreciate the offer, unfortunately, at this time of my life I really do not have the time, maybe in a few more years.

    Maryam, I think Mayank’s point about Bahrain was not that it is Hedonism on the Gulf, it is that it is (unofficially) recognized as a place where Muslims go to blow off steam, but no long-bearded jihadis are running around blowing up discos.

    In contrast to Saudi Arabia, a tourist could walk into a shop and talk to a female native shopkeeper, walk down the street and not see only women head to toe in shapeless black. One would see males and females sitting together in restaurants, not segregated. No doubt there are some wild clubs in Bahrain, but most visitors to Manama would only notice a fair amount of mosques and friendly locals as well as citizens of other countries, sitting in coffeeshops, this time of year they’d all be watching the World Cup, and if they saw you taking interest, they might invite you to sit with them and watch as well. If you are going to smoke a water pipe with them (it’s only tobacco, folks), I advise mint tea, no milk, it’s soothing to the throat.

  • SAM

    Mayank I have to admit your article on Bahrain was very expressive and it seems pretty much true. However, as a writer describing a certain place and publishing the article for the whole world to see, it’s always much better to not only point out it’s cons, but pros as well.

    Now I feel you and believe your intention wasn’t to portray it as a bad place but when talking about someone else’s country, try to put yourself in their shoes first. Masking the article with a few positive remarks about the calls to prayer and mosques didn’t do much either. A great many would see this as a good article but an equal amount would be insulted and this would only serve to gain you more disrespect from a nation you sought pleasure in and enjoyed for a whole weekend.

    Imagine someone visiting India and simply writing about its downside and making it seem even more insulting with a topic such as the one you used…

    I live about half an hour from Bahrain and visit relatives there regularly and travel through theere regularly. I’m neither Bahraini nor Saudi but still respect both nations…regardless of the handful that portray a sinful image of it during night hours or weekends on those ‘honk-less smoothways’ or various clubs.

    Next time…if you come to Bahrain…hit up Maryam or even me and rest assured I’ll drive to Bahrain to give you a king’s welcome and show you around the more brighter side to Bahrain.

    Admins…this is constructive criticism…

  • http://ruinedbyreading.blogspot.com Mayank ‘Austen’ Singh

    SAM,
    I wrote what I saw. I confess I only saw one aspect of that fabulous country. I liked it.

    I understand what I liked is not exactly the facet that a part of the population living in that part of the world wants to be associated with. I have no apologies. But I’m sorry if I have hurt the sensibilities of some (or many) of my readers. But please understand that I was not conciously writing about the ‘downside’ of Bahrain. I do not consider all that fun a ‘downside’. I loved the families chilling out on the beaches as much as I loved the sound of Allah-Hu-Akbar. The latter was not a crude attempt on my part to mask my article with ‘few positive remarks’. But I concede that many people in many parts of the world consider all that pleasure sinful.

    Everyone have opinions.

    Could I have written about ‘upsides’? Yes I would have only if I had stayed beyond those three days. Beyong that memoreable Bahrainese weekend..

    And SAM, thank you for your invitaion. I will like to be shown around by you. Including all those aspects of that beautiful gulf country which you perceive to be the ‘brighter side of Bahrain’. Thanks for taking out time to read my article, and doubly thanks for writing a beautiful response.

    ps: As for ‘honkless smoothways’, I was really impressed that Bahrainese do not blow horn. I come from a part of the world where honking is a way of life and where traffic courtsies are perhaps the rudest in the planet. I liked the ‘honkless smoothways’ too!

  • ks

    great article… only the title could have been more imaginative and less hurtful to those have not taken this aricle in its correct spirit.

  • MoreValiant

    Bahrain does sound like a sybaritic joy, Mayank, but somewhere in the back of my mind I’ve heard that gay interaction is a legal offence there.

  • aka joseph

    i have been in bahrain for five years now. i say that the write up is vivid and accurate (sounds like what he describes is a real first hand experience/observation). kudos to that courageously honest writing

  • aka joseph

    on the other hand, bahrain is a beautiful country. that is the place and people as a whole. i’ve been in kuwait, saudi and uae amd i’ve never found any warmer and friendlier people than the bahrainis. like what the others said, the write up pictures that steamy side of bahrain. reflecting on that, it just shows how progressive and open minded bahrain is. well, things like that happen in any place that calls for freedom and progress. i’m not a bahraini. i just work here. i love bahrain

  • http://ruinedbyreading.blogspot.com Mayank ‘Austen’ Singh

    aka joseph, yes i did saw all that i wrote in my piece. i believe bahrain is a wondeful country; and people are particularly well-mannered, polite and friendly.

  • Jameel

    it was not fair of you writting about bahrain and making it looks as if it was the only place that such things happens , but there are many other things beuitfull things , it seems you have only been with the bad guys , i would advise you if you ever in Bahrain again please mix with the good guys so that you see the true face of Bahrain

  • fareed

    In Arabic Mayanak means fu***D! So Mayank Sing means fu***d Sing litterally! This may have something to do with Mayank Singh openion on Bahrain in his article. I guess one can only write such article if high on some thing. It is so thought provoking that only an someone high on coke can come up with something like that.

    I have lived in Bahrain for sometime and as with other countries in the world there is the good, the bad and the ugly. But man give us a break from such lunacy. Mr. Singh now wants to be invited to spend time writing about the good things in Bahrain! Oh brother. This reminds me of the American journailst i met in …… who spend his time as a guest of the local tourism office and he get invited every night like a whore to restaurants and bars just to write about how good the place is is so that tourists can glog the place. Everyone is scare to say the wrong thing in case he write a bad report! Mr. Singh went looking for whores! That is what he got!

    Facts are important: The burials are not in a small island, they are in the main land and they don’y come from nieghbouring civilisation! They are the remains of the Phoenicians who thought that Delmon (Baharin now) was the promised land so they came from what is Lebanon now and from Malta to be buried there!

    Most of the land is not reclaimed from the Persian Gulf! These 33 islands existed for for that 5000 years according to Charles Belgrave who wrote a book: Looking for Delmon! Check it out. According to British archeologist Bahrain Civilasation was sending faxes 5000 years ago in the form of terracotta plates seen in Oman. He said they were copies of the same plates dug in Bahrain. They were identical and resembled an invoice between two traders in Copper. The Omani Copper supplier eventually went out of business as his copper quality was not not up to standard.

    I guess Mayank Singh article was not up to standard!

  • http://ruinedbyreading.blogspot.com Mayank ‘Austen’ Singh

    Ouch! Give me few days fareed. I will check my facts, and if they are incorrect, I will render an apology.

    So my name Mayank (which means ‘moon’ in Sanskrit) translates to ‘fu***d’ in Arabic? How cool! Smile.

    Thanks for taking out time to read my piece and in writing a intelligent response, fareed.

  • save

    Cant say nothing because when you search who gets benefit from all these things you will not dare to talk,he is one+the run away colnel.So stop teling these things about impier of????

  • Ba7RaiNeYa

    Mayank
    Although I appreciate your style of writing, very intriguing and exciting, I disagree on several facts you’ve placed in your article. But I dont blame you; three days are not enough to get a proper perspective on any country.

    You’ve been to the “hip and cool” places, and although you’ve laid out the scenarios slightly exaggerated with some “cruel intentions”, you have not examined or looked at the places that represent what over 70% of Bahrainis are like: CONSERVATIVE.

    I do not mean extreme conservatives, but the modest MUSLIM population of Bahrain, who have their social freedom in hand, but keep religion and respect to the faith first.

    The people you talk about, more specifically the sons of businessmen whom you call spoilt, are a minority in this country. I would like to point out to you the fact that Bahrain is not the richest in the gulf, you may want to refer to a middle east wealth report and get the figures from there. The majority of bahraini boys go to malls for hangouts (and not seef), enjoy playing football in the neighborhood, and watching tv.

    You’ve missed out so much, and its only unfair to represent a country by examing one extreme of it. I would advise you to reconsider your article especially with the fact that it could influence people in making inapropriate judgments of my country. Why don’t you let us know where you come from?

  • http://ruinedbyreading.blogspot.com Mayank ‘Austen’ Singh

    Ba7RaiNeYa, as i said, what i wrote was just one aspect of your beautiful country. i agree there must be many versions. as to where i come from? check my new blog. it is called: The Delhi Walla
    the address is:
    thedelhiwalla.blogspot.com
    i’ll appreciate your visit there…

  • methuselah

    Bahrain is beautiful, the people are very nice, but the cost of living is very high. Even modest condos are quite expensive.

  • Dubai Resident

    [Edited]

    Before writing about Bahrain, you should visit the neighbouring countries (Saudi, Qatar, the UAE, Oman, and Kuwait) and compare their local cutlture to that of Bahrain.

    I live in Dubai and have to say that there is no genuine society in the Gulf like Bahrain. The locals dress the way they like, both western and traditional without any judgements. They work in every field, including the fast food outlets and the sweeping of bathrooms at the airport. They discuss real issues; how to make Bahrain a better place for them and future generations. They live under difficult circumstances; more than 25% of the LOCAL population make under US$ 500 a month and support families with that.

    So artificial is what I would call your comments, coming from someone that is ignorant and portraying an image that is not reflective of reality. Get the facts straight and then maybe someone will finance a long term trip to the country. If this is the quality of your writing, mostly based on lies, even if it cost 1 cent to finance that trip you ask for you wouldn’t be worth it.

    Thanks for portraying the wrong image of Bahrain. For people like you, you are better off spending three days in a town next door to yours and writing about that… It is closer to your culture and it wouldn’t be challenge for you to really understand it.

  • http://ruinedbyreading.blogspot.com Mayank ‘Austen’ Singh

    Cool down Mr. (or Madame?) Dubai Resident! My version is just one aspect of that country. Understand that.

  • Tameem

    Maynak,
    For starters you only visited Bahrain for a few days. You have taken real events and twisted them and added some spice to make them seem appealing to the western reader.

    The reason you have added this spice and crap is to make your book sell more copies. Believe me i have lived in Bahrain my whole life, in fact i am a bahraini, and for starters Sheikhs or even Bahraini men do not go out with their wives to 3 star hotels and even if they did, it would not be to the Crown Plaza. You would more lkely see married couples in malls or restaurants or even coffe shops but not a 3 star hotel!!!!!

    Moreover, the bars and night clubs you describe are shabby and dirty joints that no spoilt Bahraini or even decent Bahraini would be seen alive in. In my opinion i dont think you were able to get into one of the the good or lets say middle to upper class night spots. I believe sir that you spent most of your time here going to the cheaper places “maybe that is were you get your satisfaction from? who knows”.

    Ooops almost forgot, the part about girls and boys humping in cars by the sea, well that is also crap. Yes it happens and if you get caught then you are really F….ed. We have undercover police officers 24 hours a day patrolling areas like these to catch people that hump in cars and in public. Tell me why would someone screw in a car when it is so easy and cheap to rent a flat and actually screw on a comfortable bed rather than a car?

    In conclusion you called my country the whore of arabia, when in fact you “are the whore of arabia”. Why dont you come back and this time i will introduce you to another side of the coutry, maybe this time you could go back home and write about how you got screwed up the ass “Bahraini Style” and finally become the Complete “Whore of Arabia” that you are son.

    Toodles

  • Marwa

    Dudes… Next time you travel anywhere, I think you need to get advise on where to hang-out and what kind of a place you are going to.. you see things like these all around the world( if you’ve ever been anywhere else that is )
    Try spending more time on better things to do, than writng comments that relate to a small part of a society. I would advise you to read more about cultures.

    One last thing …. Get a life !!!

  • Bash

    Maynak,

    I guess you were living a fairy tale in bahrain, cause 80% of what you said was total bullsh*t dude …

    Are you sure you’ve been to bahrain not somewhere else ?

  • http://mahmood.tv Mahmood Al-Yousif

    Thank you for this post Mayank, and for visiting my country, even for a short while. I think you will enjoy your time in our fair isles a lot more had you had more time to spend here.

    I do have several issues with your portrayal of Bahrain, Bahrainis and residents. Although, like any other country on Earth, we do have our problems, and our less than desirable facets, I strongly disagree with your portrayal of the island and its inhabitants as I do strongly object to your choice of title, even if it is done “in the best sense of the word.”

    Your post further demonstrates a complete disregard for even very basic facts any casual visitor would observe. As they are far too many in this post to list, I shall only urge any genuine person interested in knowing more about Bahrain to take the time to talk and read from people actually living here. A good place to start is a Bahraini blog aggregator written mostly by Bahrainis and mostly in English.

  • http://ruinedbyreading.blogspot.com Mayank ‘Austen’ Singh

    I’ll surely visit bahrainblogs.org. Thanks.

  • bahrainiya

    Well Mr. Singh, I think in your short visit to bahrain, you have chosen to not only go to the negative aspect of the counrty, but have also sunk to such a low level of portraying it that it is plain sick! You have successfully magnified ONE NEGATIVE about the country and have narrow-mindedly disregarded any positive. Despite all the bad, there are many goods..the hospitality of the people, the culture & civilisations of Bahrain, what it has achieved so far -which quite a lot taking into account the size and resources..All this is just to name a few..but i guess three days in a new country and you chose to go to bars and nightclubs to satisfy your own sick needs..I would suggest the next time you decide to go and visit a country find out a little more substance about the place you are visiting

  • Sahar

    With all do respect to others who actually invited you back to Bahrain (this is me presuming that you actually went)I do not want a person like you entering into my LOVELY country. A word of advise do not show people your article as it shows what type of person you are, shallow minded and cheap.

  • Bint el 3arab

    This kind of writing appeals to the horney mantality of such people as the writer. A few points that need to be noted:
    1. Not all men that wear the thobe are sheiks or rich.
    2. If all the people in the clubs are indian/asian or american, how does that make Bahrain the whore of the Gulf, in the same pattern of thinking, wouldn’t that make India the pimp?

    Please do not generalise and make stereotypes of a whole culture. We are not allowed to attack an individual but he has the right to attack a whole country and mind you the ruling family?

    I suggest that the writer, being an indian, should discuss the issues closer to his understanding, maybe even discuss similar issues that happen in his country (India).

  • Ruvy in Jerusalem

    Mayank,

    Thank you fro the invite to Delhi,

    Who knows? Maybe, one day…

    To all those Bahrainis who feel offended by this article, I’ll say this. Bahrainis themselves weren’t being criticized. If anyone was being held up tp criticism, it was the Saudis running away from the strictures of their own society.

    I politely suggest that the article’s title is what really bothers you. But he got you to read it with that title…

  • http://ruinedbyreading.blogspot.com Mayank ‘Austen’ Singh

    Oh yes, dear Bint el 3arab! I will love to discuss India. India is beautiful. India is ugly. India attracts. India repulses. India is the land of Gandhi. It is also a nation of Hitler lovers. India is a funny civilization where we kill people beacuse they belong to the ‘wrong’ religion. (We burn people alive. We slit their throat. We can be inhumans. Terrible ones at that) India has some of the world’s richest people. India has one of the biggest population of the world’s poor. India has a rich past. India has a miserable present. India has a hopeful future. Perhaps. And yes India has whores, sluts and pimps. India has wretched red light districts (most of them not as exciting as Bahrain’s) in almost every city, town and village. India boast of great family values. India is also a place where we burn our brides for dowries. India claims to worship female gods. India is also a culture where female embryos are killed within the mother’s womb. India shouts itself as the world’s biggest democracy. india is also the place where moneyed people can have their way – right or wrong. India has Taj Mahal. But India has also some of the ugliest city shacks that has defaced this planet. India’s infrastructure stinks (It is nothing like Bahrain’s). India is a mad, mad place. And I like it! Plan to visit it some day.

    ps: Oh yes book shops in India are fabulous. Bahrain scores very low in this aspect…smile…

  • Bint el 3arab

    Ruvy in Jerusalem

    ‘Bahrainis themselves weren’t being criticized.’

    I completely disagree.. Did you read the first part about the man and his wife? Or the part about the US marines and the sheikahs? Or about the rich kids? They’re all Bahraini!

    Not only did he insult the people of Bahrain, he insulted the royal family and the religion. The way he kept repeating Islam is so cool and all of that.

    And by the way, I have never once seen a Bahraini woman swim in her Abaya! that is just ridiculous!

  • Bint el 3arab

    Mayank ‘Austen’ Singh

    There you go.. That’s much better.. You just go on talking about things that you have a right to do.

    And let the Bahrainis critisize their own country or say whatever they want.

  • http://ruinedbyreading.blogspot.com Mayank ‘Austen’ Singh

    When I called Bahrain the whore of Arabia, I did not mean it literally. For Allah’s sake! I only wished to point out a certain charming decadence of the place. A sort of what Shanghi (the WHORE of the Orient) used to be in the middle of the last century. What Bombay is to India right now. I wanted to point out Bahrain as a breathing space in the middle of a region which can be chokingly conservative. And no, my piece should not even be taken as a criticism of the Saudis who flock there during the weekends for pleasure purposes. In fact I feel bad for them that they do not have access to the kind of fun, normal in open societies, in their own countries. I had intended my article as a tribute to the free-sprit fabulousness of Bahrain. Not as an insult. For sure.

    Bint el 3arab:
    I think I have a right to pass my judgement on every country. I understand you too to exercise the same right. All the countries, all the religions, all the cultures, all the races, all the skin colors, all the ways of living, all the air that float over all the lands, all the water that flows in all the oceans are mine too. We all belong to every thing. Let’s not divide the world into seperate boxes and compartments for each one of us……

  • Ruvy in Jerusalem

    Bint el 3Arab,

    On a second (actually a third) read, it may be that it is Bahrainis are being described in a fashion less to your taste.

    But Mayank wrote about what he saw. Were he to vist Eilat, he might see much the same thing, albeit with different nationalities in play. And he is eminently qualified to write about what he sees and about his impressions. That is what travel writing is all about.

  • elfelfel

    Mayank, or if you me allow me to call you “rafeek” as indians and bahraini people in Bahrain like to ‎call each others in a friendly way… I wonder why you didn’t pick that from the ‎culture here.. grain

    anyway, please allow me to quote from your reply #9: “”I regret if folks are hurt by ‎me calling Bahrain the ‘whore of arabia’. Of course if anybody cared to read it ‎through the end, it would be quite clear that I meant it in the best sense of the ‎term.”” Unquote.‎

    I wonder, how would you react if I call you a son of a whore, and I argue you that ‎I meant that in the best sense of the term? sounds nice? .. smile

    I also noted in your reply that you were referring to what you have written in first ‎place as “my piece”, I wonder what word you missed there?!! mmmm, let me ‎guess.. I found it .. I found it (may god bless who found the soap in his bath tab).. ‎you need to refer to it as “my piece of SH**”. And I assure you that I meant that in ‎the best sense of the term… big smile

    Being done with the glossaries, dear rafeek, why don’t you take my advice and ‎start writing about the following, sorry, I meant start writing another pieces of ‎SH** about the following – not forgetting to mention that I meant that in the best ‎sense of the term -:‎

    ‎1. Why indians and pakies does not like to be called “rafeek” in UK? And in ‎particular, why do they reply by saying: ” I am not rafeek any more, I have British ‎nationality now”?!‎

    ‎2. Why do indians are the best people in IT, however, the indians are the ones ‎who made Darwin believe and “sell” his own theory about the human being ape ‎in first place?‎

    ‎3. Why do indians eat a lot of chilli, yet they never get Gastric and Duodenal ‎Ulcers… I am not showing off here, I got the terms from a medical dictionary… ‎french smile: smile with tongue (all rights of the icon is reserved to elfelfel).‎

    ‎4. What is the relationship between the globalization of the Kama Sutra theory ‎and the limitations of the indian man mind, which positively contributed on the ‎increment of the no. of indian housemaids whores in the Arabian gulf region… ‎not forgetting to mention that I meant that in the best sense of the term.‎

    elfelfel – bahrain

  • http://ruinedbyreading.blogspot.com Mayank ‘Austen’ Singh

    elfelfel, uh sorry rafeek, smile…..more smile….now a french smile…..now like when i will smile to a goat…now im just smiling…..hey am really smiling….smile…more smile…..and more smile….and more of it….its fun!

    Thanks Ruvy!

  • elfelfel

    Dear rafeek,‎

    well, it is fun to see you speechless, as guess what, Bahrainis can write english too… ‎goaty smile, which reminded me of a story I read once in the newspaper about an indian ‎labour, the poor guy was working in dubai and could not manage to handle the natural ‎human sexual needs, so he went and had sex with a goat, and blame it on the one ‎newspaper, but it was also mentioned in the article, that during the intercourse, the guy ‎was smiling to the goat!! mmmmmmm, things tend to make more sense eventually!!‎

    By the way rafeek, two more topics to make a use off:‎

    ‎1. Indians expats not working and using the free internet connections at the office for ‎personal uses and getting paid for things they never do.‎

    ‎2. A ‎multilanguage dictionary of common indian words that has been globalize recently, ‎such as but not limited to, Bagal, Char O bees, Chapati..etc.‎

    I would like to end by a slogan that is used by one of my dear indian colleagues:‎

    ‎”make less international calls and send the money back home”.‎

    God bless human being… and help the goats surviving from sex extremists. ….. frensh smile

  • fs1223

    i got sent this article from a friend who told me it was absolutely infuriating. but i found it rather pleasant. one problem i had is that the culture was often refered to as “islam” the religion, but a point arises- attitudes within the culture are born from religion. and though its true as many pointed out, the writer only shed light on one side of bahrain, but still i think he did an excellent job at that. and to paint it so beautifully as well is gracious of him. those of you who are offended should not be. i am a bahraini, i am proud and i love my home very much, but it must be admitted, that the picture painted of bahraini Culture is not far from the truth at all. for a place so small, bahrain’s history and deep rooted cultural complications are impressionable. so, for a three day trip, i think the author did a fantastic job taping on to one very prominent facet of my country.
    thank you

    fs

  • fs1223

    oh and i think the title is just hilarious, its great!!!

  • Rishi.K.Trivedi

    I feel Bahrain is a paradise on Earth with God fearing, noble and very decent human beings who love the family way of life and are simple and honest and make very good friends.
    I have lived in Bahrain for several years and am really pained to read the article of Mayank.
    It’s not Bahrain he describes at all.
    Bahrain is a very nice decent place.

  • hasan

    after all that u said about bahrain u big idiot, maybe u can come back for a quick visit and get ur ass kicked and maybe u can pick up all ur cousins from all cars parking and take them to ur lovely country to get burned alive…and god bless kamasutrah :P:P u called bahrain the whore of arabia , after kamasutrah what do u call india?!?!?1 the whore-house perhaps !!!!!

  • fs1223

    Bint el 3arab, you make it sound as though insulting the royal family is even worse than insulting the ‘others’. so what if he ‘insulted’ the ruling family, does gold run through their veins? i think not.
    you make it sound as though he was meaning to insult in the first place. and if you read the article again, with an open mind to see the literary style, the imagery created, and to feel trully what the writer’s tone was, you should not be angry.
    for all you bahraini’s way too ‘offended’ to actually read the article closely, and saying he ought to look at a different side of bahrain, well you are just showing him the most wonderful side aren’t you?? the side of the polite and tolerant and kind people. i am ashamed!! whatever happend to bahraini’s being the kindest and most hospitable? the most accepting and tolerant people?? what i see above is racism, intolerance, and just a want to be angry at anything

    a writer has all the privilege to document what he sees and what he feels. he has the courage to see the beauty along side the beast in his own country, and that is a liberation that ought to be practiced by everyone.
    can anyone deny that bahrain is the ‘nightspot’ for saudi’s?? i complain about the traffic they cause every single weekend. can it be denied that there are hookers walking downtown exhibition? i’ve seen them! and can it be denied that some spoilt little boys drive their daddy’s car? no of course not. since when is the truth an insult? and yes the article (to a bahraini) seems like there are many holes, and perhaps it is not the whole truth, but some of this exists whether people like to admit it or not.

    the writer’s biggest mistake is confusing religion with culture. and it was a shame he didn’t get to meet and stay with a bahraini family, or extend his visit
    there is much more that i would love to have shown him. and i would be delighted to read again his prespective on bahrain, i found his attitude delightful and fresh.

  • JP

    fs1223, You are absolutely right in saying that one should not be offended by this article. I applaud your open and refreshing attitude! And this is what I think that the author missed out on his visit in Bahrain. Their youth are well educated, open minded as well as having strong family values. Unfortunately, your country’s progress towards social freedom has its drawbacks. In this case you have Saudis flocking towards Manama on weekends trying to escape there overly conservative society. Again nobody can deny that Bahrain is the “nightspot for Saudi’s”. However the benefits of that progress far outweighs the negative consequences.

    In that sense Bahrain becomes the envy of Arabia, and I think that this is the point Mayank was actually trying to make. I can see were people could have a problem with the title. Even if it was not meant to be taken literally, and I understand that, perhaps it was a little harsh – especially that you mention “Bangladeshi whores…sluts…etc” in the article, the readers have a hard time associating that same word as a metaphor with their beloved country, when a few paragraphs later that same word is to be taken in its real sense. I can see where that could hit a nerve!

    I have some very good friends that live in Bahrain, which prompted me to visit this tiny kingdom for a few weeks, a couple of years ago. Although I did see some of what you so vividly describe, I had the chance to hang out with many Bahraini’s who definitely showed me those other facets that you are missing out on. They were all very welcoming, respectful and proud of their culture. And when fs1223 says that “there is much more that i would love to have shown him”, you better believe that it is true. I know from first hand experience how eager Bahraini’s are to show visitors the many facets of there beautiful country.

  • fs1223

    thank you JP for this wonderful note on my country. bahrain’s economical, architectural, and etc proliferation in the past few years is much impressive, and despite some of its cultural drawbacks, i grow more fond of my homeland everyday (except in august of course lol) true bahrain is full of well educated youngsters, eager to contribute to their world, and its a shame Mayanak missed the opportunity to mingle with those who would have been ready to reveal much to him about the richness which flows within this tiny speck of land.
    and JP i’m glad to hear you enjoyed Bahrain, also once known as Paradise! :)

  • Hana Hussain

    Labelling Bahrain based on a biased visit of three days where all you did was visit sleazy nightclubs, is like forming an opinion about the city of London based on a visit to Soho. We are cultured, educated and whereas the seedy side to Bahrain does exist, so does another side. Also, you did not seem to interact with any Bahrainis.. Most of us do not frequent the sort of places you visited. But if you spent time with most Bahrainis, you would find them kind, intelligent and very friendly. Please visit again, and this time broaden the horizons of your visit.

  • Bahraini

    Dear Whatever,

    I’m sure that you have seen better places with better whores back in your home town of Delhi, as pointed out by other readers, every country has its own nightlife or dark side as refered to in the same comment.

    I agree some of what you saw is unfortuenatlly true, but also some of it is not!

    you only saw what you wanted to see, you went to all the “fun places” as you said or shall i say the wrong places, which is not a fair way to describe a country since you willingly chose the places to go, you interpreted everything from your own prespective!

    i’d like you to visit the same kind of places in your own town and write your own opinion of it, i’m sure you’ll see much much worse but i know you’ll be ashamed to write it as crule as you did about Bahrain.

    God bless us all

  • Princess

    well well well!! bahrain is my home and the love of my life. Yes bahrain has change alot but can’t really say for the better or for the worse?? i remember my school days how much fun it was. Now with too many nationalities, people don’t trust anyone and the foreigners (MY GOODNESS) how they disrescpect the arab people. They come and take our men and swear at arab women fight in the face. I’ll tell you a short story that happened few weeks ago with an american women who had block the way to our building.My sister waited for her to move and the american women started waving her hands in her car. My sister just ignored her and waited for her to move. so i went and did a u-turn to pick my sister up who had parked her car in the building. The american women passed my sister in her car and called her a B*$ch. HAHAHAH just because my sister wearing an abaya doens’t mean she don’t know english. My sister yelled back the same to her. She slammed on her breaks and came out for her. by that time i was close to picking her up and i slammed on my breaks and came out to see what was going on. Yelling and yelling and waving her hands on my sisters face. My little sister was calm and said you were wrong for parking there and why she called her names. funny thing was that the american started saying we are here to protect your country. I went up to her face and told her off and said that if she wanted to talk politics, i would be happy to talk about it. This has not been the first time for me or any other arab girl. We live just like any other rich or poor people.And i have heard and seen many foreigners men and women trying to pick up a fight with arab people. Outsiders are surpise that we arab women wear western cloths. we don’t ride camels. Remember one thing people out there who think that we arab people live and are rich. There is alot of poor people who still have no homes, no job or family. bahrain is a friendly place and where ever you go, there are arabs. we live to live, we help where we can, we die like anyone else.

  • http://thedelhiwalla.blogspot.com Mayank ‘Austen’ Singh

    Oh, Princess, that is true. Bahrainese are very normal people, just like any other folks in any part of the world.

    The experience with the American was disappointing. But you’ll find such people in every nationality. We all are human beings first after all..some are good..many are bad..some are downright repulsive..many are arrogant…..some are….

  • fs1223

    to Bahraini, i do not want to speak on behalf of the author. but i do not think he meant at all to be cruel in his tone about bahrain. and contrary to what you said, i do not think he would be ashamed to speak what he sees of his own country or any other.

    and to Princess, i am sorry you and your sister had to encounter such a disrespectful woman. it is true what Mayank says, such people are everywhere, in every race, in every culture… but do not think that all foreigners and expats are like that. some of my friends living in bahrain are american, english, canadian, french, indian and they love this country as though it were their home. they understand and respect the culture, religion, and the arabs. and i hope that such an encounter will not cause you to judge every american or foreigner you could next come across

  • Princess

    i grew up most of my life with different nationalites, hardly with arab women because of the school i went to. We never saw any color or religion or nationality in each other. Like i said the best years were my school days. Yeah things have been getting out of control that i’m still shocked to see it in my country. (regarding the women). I myself was critising on how open women are. But then i thought to myself, they are just having fun and no one is stopping them from ruining the names of an arab women. I just hope that everyone gets along and no one puts any bad ideas about Bahrain or about the arab women. We’re living in the year 2000 and alot has changed.

  • Abs 40

    As a tourist Mayank, you could easily find some intresting places to visit that will keep in your mind a touch of Bahrain. But you didnt !!

    In those three days in bahrain you just went to CLUBS, HOTELS AND MALLS. How can you judge a country without going to its historical places (which there are so much in Bahrain that go for more than one thousand years;thats intresting), or tourists attractions such as the formula 1 arena, museum, or have a tourist talk to you abuot the country and explain what people in Bahrain do and whats there culture.

    I’m sure if you wanted to discover Bahrain you’ll not go to clubs, hotels or malls as i said earlier.

    By the way, as we all know that Islam is a religion where drinking alcohol, having affairs, smoking cigarettes,having drugs are totally not allowed and not legal. Just look how pure is this religion and how it keeps the people health and safety as an important aspect !! There’s plenty of stuff that you can read about Islam.

    Do you know why there are clubs in Bahrain Mayank? Think for a second “bahrain is a muslim country – clubbing, alcohol are illegal” Allright let me tell you: They are made for the tourists!! Think again for a second… Bahrain wants to please its tourists and keep their regular activities active in Bahrain so that they dont complain such as they do to the countries that dont provide those stuff “ooh there’s no alcohol or clubs!! whats this country” After that we should be thanked at least for providing that, but oppositley you blamed us !!

    Anyway about what you said that you saw a car parked by the bridge that was humping which means that there’s something going on in there;probably s– !! Well thats a common thing that happens in most of the countries in the world these days, but im more than 100% sure that you didnt saw that because i know that area extremely well and its easily spotted by the highway and bridge, while that area is full of cops and undercover agents 24/7 !! how could that happen ? and you know if anyone is cought doing that in bahrain not only by cops even if by his friends or cousins he’s extremley busted !!

    Anyway whatever your name is, by publishing this article or book im sure that you have a certain GOAL hidden for your intrest. But believe me, even if you wrote thousands of books based on lies about Bahrain, you’ll not change the view of this Country to the world.

    I wish you good luck in your life mayank and hope that you’ll know how to judge a country in your next trip.

  • http://thedelhiwalla.blogspot.com Mayank Austen Soofi

    Abs 40, your country rocks. I love it. When I will become a super-rich big time novelist, I will buy a sprawling estate somewhere in Manama and will spend my time reading in the country’s beaches.

    Yes, Islam, like other religions of the world, has a great value system and I have nothing but immense respect for it. Yes, Bahrain has a rich cultural heritage. Its malls, discos, bars are just one aspect, albiet an aspect linking it to the rest of the world. Its malls are merely one of the fruits – or curses depending on your viewpoint – of globalization.

  • Princess

    Abs 40 thanx! Bahrain rocks!!!!!!

  • http://www.rnc-bpoi.com Neelan

    Any country & religion has its own plus and minus.And I feel the tourist to Bharain has only put down a good narrartive.He does not claim it to be an authoritative account on Baharain.Nor is it supposed to be a guide to Bahrain.Visiting Bombay also you can have a similar experience. And as with Christian,Hindu and other religions, Islam has its followers who enjoy frolicking and “enjoying” life.The city of Hyderabad in India has a large number of child prostitutes, mostly from poor Muslim families.They are pushed into the flesh trade by the very people who are supposed to protect them-the clergy.Gulf marriage is also common in the muslim belt in Kerala- Calicut and Malappuram.Wealthy Arabs visit Hyderabad and Calicut to “marry”girls who are not even eighteen.After a month or so of sex,they juct return to their country .The girls deliver children and soon they are pushed into the flesh trade.Religion is not the culprit here-it is the small section in that religion who are lured to such practices.

  • MeeM

    When I first read the name of your article, I understood why, I am Bahraini and thought straight away that an authoritive figure had written it, ugly and harsh as it is. All I wanted to add was that we do have a free open minded society despite being muslim, but that does not reflect on the people. The key thing to remember is that we give the people the choice, and to assume that what you saw is what the majority of the people do that is not wrong.

    My only problem is with a few skewed facts; the humping incident is a very famous urban myth which i’m sure happened once, but since then it’s true about the undercover police. Secondly, assuming that everyone is rich is very wrong, because the last place in the Gulf to assume that would be Bahrain (nothing to be ashamed of).

    Most of the people here do not agree with all this going on, we’d rather it be stopped or closed. Ofcourse, we know to each his own, and if it wasn’t allowed publicly it would be done. If not Bahrain, then Dubai, if not Dubai then Lebannon and so on.. If someone was looking for these people they would find it. There is much truth in your article, but some words and generalizations are insulting.

    Reading this made me very proud of Bahraini people, not because of their patriotism, but because now anyone who reads this article finds out the level of education in my country men.

    PLUS COMMENT #47 deserves a standing ovation =)

  • Meem

    sorry i meant:

    The key thing to remember is that we give the people the choice, and to assume that what you saw is what the majority of the people do IS WRONG

  • http://thedelhiwalla.blogspot.com Mayank Austen Soofi

    Meem, I never claimed that what I see people doing is what all the Bahrinese do.

  • Emanee

    Wow. haha Bahrain is quite the beauty innit :).

  • John

    I’ve lived in Bahrain half my life, I have no problem with anyone’s views about Bahrain or whatever they have to say, they can criticize all they want but hardly anything written here is true!! its total fabrication, some of the stuff written here are completely ridiculous

  • John

    one more thing, sea scooters in the middle of the night? hahahah!

  • Mark

    Dude… R u talking about bahrain?? lol… Its funny how come u got to see only the “whory” side of the place. No offence man but it seems as if u’ve never been to ANY place on earth except Saudi… oh yeah.. And ur 3 day trip to Bahrain… I was born and brought up in Bahrain… I’ve lived 18 years of my life there (i’m 21…)… I think the freedom and the “whoriness” of the place doesn’t come close to what you can see in indian cities like mumbai or bangalore… Why dont u take a trip to dubai and you will definitely see what a “whory” place looks like…

  • Mirror

    That’s only reflect who you are. Good people gets to see good things and bad people sees only bad things even if it is a minor. Congratulations on giving us the big picture of who you are. A really good job…

  • a guy

    hehehe girls from here are cunts xD